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References - H

This page lists references with citation tags that begin with the letter H. For other references and a documentation on how these references are cited, see the main references page. You can also click on these direct links to the various pages:

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References - H

[Haapaniemi 2001] Tarja Haapaniemi. Autonomic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease and its Correlates to Medication and Dopamine Transporter Binding, Doctoral dissertation – University of Oulu, Finland, April 9, 2001, 87 pages, ISBN 951-42-5963-7. Autonomic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease and its Correlates to Medication and Dopamine Transporter Binding Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) may suffer from autonomic nervous system dysfunction even in the early phase of the disease. We assessed the autonomic cardiovascular and sudomotor regulation in de novo PD patients with and without medication. We also measured the dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT) uptake in the PD patients using 2β-carboxymethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) SPECT and studied the clinical correlates of the uptake. Sixty PD patients were included in the study and randomised to receive levodopa, bromocriptine or selegiline (n=20 in each) as their treatment. Thirty patients were examined with β-CIT SPECT. The results of the patients were compared with those of healthy controls and within the subgroups at different time points.

Cardiovascular autonomic regulation was assessed using standard cardiovascular reflex tests at baseline, after six months' medication and following a 6-week washout period. The heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) regulation was impaired in PD patients at baseline, and PD medications modified the responses further. Bromocriptine and selegiline, in contrast to levodopa, increased the orthostatic BP fall and suppressed the BP response to isometric exercise. The long-term cardiovascular autonomic function was evaluated from ambulatory ECG recordings by analysis of traditional spectral and non-spectral components of HR fluctuation together with two-dimensional vector analysis and power-law relationship analysis of the HR dynamics. All spectral measures and the slope of the power-law relationship demonstrated impaired tonic cardiovascular regulation in the PD patients.

Sympathetic sudomotor activity was evaluated using the sympathetic skin response (SSR). The major finding was suppression of the SSR amplitudes with an inverse correlation to clinical disability, whereas PD medication seemed to have only minor effects. The changes in amplitude and repetitiveness of the SSRs with normal adaptation suggest deficits at several levels of the SSR reflex arc.

DAT uptake, assessed by β-CIT SPECT, was diminished in the striatum and especially the putamen of the PD patients, and correlated with the results of the cardiovascular reflex tests and ambulatory ECG recordings. Simultaneous measurement of SERT binding demonstrated decreased SERT availability in the thalamic and frontal areas.

The results demonstrate disturbances of the reflectory and tonic cardiovascular autonomic regulation caused by PD itself. PD medications further modify the reflectory responses. The degenerative process in PD also involves the sympathetic sudomotor pathway. β-CIT SPECT provides a useful method for simultaneous assessment of DAT and SERT binding, demonstrating the deficit of serotonin metabolism in PD.

[Habibi 2013] Assal Habibi, Vinthia Wirantana, and Arnold Starr. “Cortical Activity During Perception of Musical Pitch”, Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Volume 30, Number 5, June 2013, pages 463–479, doi:10.1525/mp.2013.30.5.463. Publication 10.1525/mp.2013.30.5.463 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This study investigates the effects of music training on brain activity to violations of melodic expectancies. We recorded behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) responses of musicians and nonmusicians to discrepancies of pitch between pairs of unfamiliar melodies based on Western classical rules. Musicians detected pitch deviations significantly better than nonmusicians. In musicians compared to nonmusicians, auditory cortical potentials to notes but not unrelated warning tones exhibited enhanced P200 amplitude generally, and in response to pitch deviations enhanced amplitude for N150 and P300 (P3a) but not N100 was observed. P3a latency was shorter in musicians compared to nonmusicians. Both the behavioral and cortical activity differences observed between musicians and nonmusicians in response to deviant notes were significant with stimulation of the right but not the left ear, suggesting that left-sided brain activity differentiated musicians from nonmusicians. The enhanced amplitude of N150 among musicians with right ear stimulation was positively correlated with earlier age onset of music training. Our data support the notion that long-term music training in musicians leads to functional reorganization of auditory brain systems, and that these effects are potentiated by early age onset of training.

[Hacker 1995] Paul Hacker (born 1948); Susan Papayik (compositions); Jason Hacker (illustrations). Winds of the Past — Guide to Playing the Native American Flute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1995, ASIN B0006RA3U4. no staff notation, six-hole finger diagrams. Contains 9 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hackett 1942] Charles Wilson Hackett; Charmion Clair Shelby (translations of original documents). Revolt of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Otermin's Attempted Reconquest 1680-1682, published by the University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1942. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hadlock 1941] Wendell S. Hadlock. Three Shell-heaps on Frenchman's Bay, Bulletin of the Robert Abbe Museum, Volume 6, 1941, 63 pages, ASIN B0007FYRO8 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hadlock 1943] Wendell S. Hadlock. “Bone Implements from Shell Heaps around Frenchman's Bay, Maine”, American Antiquity, Volume 8, Number 4, published by the Society for American Archaeology, April 1943, pages 341–353. Publication 275866 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Haeberli 1979] Joerg Haeberli. “Twelve Nasca Panpipes: A Study”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 23, Number 1, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, January 1979, pages 57–74. Publication 851338 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From the introduction: Faithful production of sound, as originally intended, is achieved with instruments that have not undergone any significant change since their construction. Instruments made of clay or stone meet this requirement of preservation over long periods. The dry climate prevalent on the Peruvian coast has preserved fragile textiles and also musical instruments (found among the contents of graves). Museum and private collections retain such artifacts, and panpipes made by craftsmen of the Nasca culture have been preserved in sufficient numbers for comparative studies.

The purpose of this study is to describe twelve Nasca panpipes, to present tonometric measurements, and to analyze the determined frequency intervals in order to establish the scale system intended for the tuning of these panpipes

[Haefer 1972] J. Richard Haefer. An Anthology of Papago Traditional Music, may be contained in [Heth 1980], published by Canyon Records, C6084, 1972. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Haefer 1975] J. Richard Haefer. “North American Indian Musical Instruments: Some Organological Distribution Problems”, American Musical Instrument Society Journal, Volume 1, 1975, pages 56–85. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hafiz 1999] Khwāja Shams-ud-Dīn Muhammad Hāfez-e Shīrāzī (1325–1389); Daniel Ladinsky (translation). The Gift, published by Penguin Compass, 1999, 333 pages, ISBN 0-14-019581-5 (978-0-14-019581-1). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract:
Publisher's description: More than any other Persian poet—even Rumi—Hafiz expanded the mystical, healing dimensions of poetry. Because his poems were often ecstatic love songs from God to his beloved world, many have called Hafiz the "Invisible Tongue." Indeed, Daniel Ladinsky has said that his work with Hafiz is an attempt to do the impossible: to render Light into words—to make the Luminous Resonance of God tangible to our finite senses.

[Hafiz 2003] Khwāja Shams-ud-Dīn Muhammad Hāfez-e Shīrāzī; Daniel Ladinsky (translation). The Subject Tonight Is Love: 60 Wild and Sweet Poems of Hafiz, published by Penguin Compass, 2003, 88 pages, ISBN 0-14-019623-4 (978-0-14-019623-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Poetry for the Native American Flute

Abstract:
Publisher's description: To Persians, the fourteenth-century poems of Hafiz are not classical literature from a remote past, but cherished love, wisdom, and humor from a dear and intimate friend. Perhaps, more than any other Persian poet, it is Hafiz who most fully accesses the mystical, healing dimensions of poetry. Daniel Ladinsky has made it his life's work to create modern, inspired translations of the world's most profound spiritual poetry. Through Ladinsky's translations, Hafiz's voice comes alive across the centuries singing his message of love.

[Hagel 2006] Stefan Hagel. Music of the Ancient Near East, October 6, 2006. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hagel 2008] Stefan Hagel. “Re-evaluating the Pompeii Auloi”, The Journal of Hellenic Studies, Volume 128, published by The Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, 2008, pages 52–71. Publication 40651723 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The four best-preserved aulos pipes unearthed at Pompeii are examined and their original pitches are as far as possible determined by mathematical analysis. It is argued that the scales of the instruments as well as specific details of their mechanism fit well with our knowledge of music from the Roman Imperial period.

[Hagel 2009] Stefan Hagel. Ancient Greek Music: A New Technical History, published by Cambridge University Press, 2009, 484 pages, ISBN 0-521-51764-8 (978-0-521-51764-5). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Offers a fundamental reworking of the history of Greek music from the classical period to Roman times. It explains anew the development of ancient melodic notation, embedding it in a context of professional music-making, in a musical culture determined mainly by the dominant instruments, the lyre and the aulos.

[Hagen 2009] Edward H. Hagen and Peter Hammerstein. “Did Neanderthals and Other Early Humans Sing? — Seeking the biological roots of music in the territorial advertisements of primates, lions, hyenas, and wolves”, Musicae Scientiae, 2009, pages 291–320, retrieved January 10, 2012. Did Neanderthals and Other Early Humans Sing? Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Group defense of territories is found in many gregarious mammalian carnivores, including lions, canids, and hyenas. In these taxa, group members often mark territory boundaries and direct aggressive behavior towards alien conspecifics found within the territory (Boydston, Morelli, & Holekamp, 2001). Middle Pleistocene hominids such as Neanderthals occupied an ecological niche similar to such large carnivores (Stiner, 2002), and so could be expected to share with them a suite of behavioral traits. Complex, coordinated vocalizations that function, at least in part, to advertise the group defense of a territory is one behavioral trait exhibited by several social carnivores, as well as many other gregarious animals, including primates. Hagen and Bryant (2003) proposed that the evolution of human music and dance was rooted in such coordinated auditory and visual territorial advertisements, an hypothesis we develop and expand upon here. Human proto-music, in essence, might have been functionally analogous to the howling of wolves.

[Hagen 2010] Edward H. Hagen and Gregory A. Bryant. “Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System”, April 19, 2010, retrieved April 20, 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hagerman 1980] B. Hagerman and J. Sundberg. “Fundamental Frequency Adjustment in Barbershop Singing”, Journal of Research in Singing, Volume 4, Number 1, 1980, pages 3–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hague 1915] Eleanor Hague (1875–1954). “Eskimo Songs”, The Journal of American Folklore, Volume 28, Number 107, published by The American Folklore Soceity, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January–March 1915, pages 96–98. Publication 534562 on JSTOR (subscription access). Publication jstor-534562 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The following Eskimo tunes were recorded by Captain George Comer on the west coast of Hudson Bay, near Cape Fullerton. Nos. 1 and 2 are chorus songs sung by women. No. 2 probably accompanies the chant of a single singer. No. 3 is a chant sung by a single person. The cylinders from which the records were made are rather faint, and part of them were so indistinct that it was impossible to catch the tune.

[Hahn 1995] Joachim Hahn and Susanne C. Münzel. “Knochenflöten aus dem Aurignacien des Geißenklösterle bei Blaubeuren, Alb-Donau-Kries «Bone Flutes from the Aurignacian of Geißenklösterle at Blaubeuren, Alb-Donau-Kries»”, Fundberichte aus Baden-Württemberg, Volume 20, in German, 1995, pages 1–12. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Hahn-K 2002] Kathrin Hahn and Oliver Vitouch. “Preference for Musical Tuning Systems: How Cognitive Anatomy Interacts with Cultural Shaping”, Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sydney, Australia, published by Causal Productions, Adelaide, Australia, 2002, pages 757–760, ISBN 1-876346-39-6 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Previous studies testing the production and evaluation of musical scales revealed a preference for Pythagorean intonation among violinists whereas pianists preferred equal temperament, with non-musicians showing no clear preferences. This study investigates preferences for four musical tuning systems using chord sequences and excerpts from musical compositions performed in different instrumental timbres. Forty participants (string players, pianists, non-musicians) made forced-choice preference judgments between pairs of tunings, as well as judgments of purity and sound brilliance. Results show that when using real music and instrumental sounds, the preferences for tuning systems vary not only between groups of participants but also between types of music and timbres. A general preference for a single tuning system therefore seems to be an over-simplified assumption.

[Hahnengress 2012] Maria L. Hahnengress. Cardiopulmonary Changes During Clarinet Playing, 2012, 22 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Since wind instrument playing impedes normal respiratory functions, its effect on expiratory and blood gases as well as on cardiac function was investigated. In 15 skilled clarinettists expiratory PO2 and PCO2 were measured in gas drawn from a modified clarinet barrel when playing a composition (Robert Schumann’s “Phantasiestücke” Op.73 for clarinet and piano) with increasing difficulty from movement 1 to movement 3. Blood gases were measured in arterialized ear lobe blood at the end of each movement and the electrocardiogram was recorded continuously. From the expiratory gas pressures one may conclude that the most advanced players adapt their ventilation to the requirements of the composition and sustain expiration during difficult parts of the composition until hypoxic alveolar PO2 values are reached (minimum 77 mmHg). Less trained clarinettists tend to hyperventilation or shallow breathing. Oxygen saturation in arterialized blood showed a slight stepwise decrease from movement to movement (control 96.6 ± 0.5(SD)%, end of concert 95.6 ± 1.0 %). SO2 was significantly higher because of possibly more effective ventilation in instrumentalists with practise time exceeding 2h daily. Mean heart rate increased to values like during moderate to heavy physical exercise depending on artistic fitness and the difficulty of the movement (maximal individual value 173 beats/minute). Additionally, a large variation might be caused through intrathoracic pressure changes, changing exertion, respiratory influences and emotion. The electrocardiogram showed no pathological events. In general clarinet playing at a professional level imposes strain on ventilation and circulation but usually not on a pathophysiological level.

[Hail 1980] Barbara Hail. Hau, Kóla! The Plains Indian Collection of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University, Studies in Anthropology and Material Culture, Volume 3, published by the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 1980, 256 pages, ISBN 0-912089-00-8 (978-0-912089-00-3), softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute

Review from American Indian Quarterly, 1983: The contribution tha Barbara Hail has made to the understanding of Plains Indian art and culture is truly significant. This unique volume puts forth one of a kind items, now owned by the Haffenreffer Museum, that once belonged to the people of the complex Plains societies. There are many find and larger collections but none has produced such a comprehensive catalogue. The frustrations of the researcher and scholar could be greatly reduced if other museums were to follow suit.

[Haines 1888] Elijah J. Haines. The American Indian «Un-nish-in-na-ba», published by The Mas-sin-na-gan Company, Chicago, 1888, 821 pages. Chapter XLIV, pages 525-534: Indian Music and Poetry. Contains 3 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Haines-B 2012] Brent Haines. “Caring for Your Native American Flute”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2012, Volume 3, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2012. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Halbmayer 2008] Ernst Halbmayer. “Meanings of Suicide and Conceptions of Death Among the Yukpa and Other Amerindians of Lowland South America «Die Bedeutung des Selbstmords und Konzeptionen des Todes bei den Yupka und anderen Indigenen des südamerikanischen Tieflandes»”, Curare, Volume 31, Number 1, in English and German, 2008, pages 72–86. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hale-H 1883] Horatio Hale. The Iroquois Book of Rites, Library of Aboriginal American Literature Native American Legal Materials Collection, Issue 2, published by D. G. Brinton, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1883, 222 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall 1984] Donald E. Hall and Joan Taylor Hess. “Perception of Musical Interval Tuning”, Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Volume 2, Number 2, Winter 1984, pages 166–195, doi:10.2307/40285290. Publication 40285290 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: When musical intervals are altered from their usual frequency ratios, listeners may experience a sensation of mistuning. We report results of experiments in which subjects judged degrees of mistuning of all intervals from unison to octave, as well as major tenth and twelfth. Using two simultaneous tones with fundamental frequencies between 250 and 800 Hz and 5 to 10 strong harmonics in each, we find: (1) just intervals, rather than tempered, are considered best in tune; (2) the range of mistunings considered acceptable generally becomes narrower when expressed in cents but wider when described by beat rate as we go from unison to octave, fifth and fourth; (3) whether that trend continues to sixths and thirds depends on individual listening strategies; and (4) the difficulty of judgment generally increases in going from the consonant toward the dissonant intervals, with the latter often eliciting only crude discrimination. Ability to judge mistuning with dichotic stimuli was also tested. We conclude that the beat rates of nearly coinciding harmonics provide an important clue to mistuning, but that a more abstract ability to judge interval size is also used; relative importance of the two strategies differs among subjects.

[Hall 1997] Butch Hall. Favorite Hymns — In Tablature for the Native American Courting Flute (song book), published by Butch Hall Flutes, 1997. No staff notation, six-hole finger diagrams. See the publisher web site. Contains 15 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Hall 2000] Butch Hall. Lesson and Song Book for the Native American Flute, First Edition, published by Butch Hall Flutes, 2000. See the publisher web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall 2002] Butch Hall. Lesson and Song Book for the Native American Flute, Second Revised Edition, published by Butch Hall Flutes, 2002. See the publisher web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall 2004] Butch Hall. Mother Earth and Father Sky Song Book for Native American Flute (song book), published by Butch Hall Flutes, 2004. See the publisher web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall-JC 1955] Jody C. Hall and Bruno Nettl. “Musical Style of the Modoc”, Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, Volume 11, Number 1, Spring 1955, pages 58–66. Publication 3628997 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall-RL 1997] Robert L. Hall. An Archaeology of the Soul: North American Indian Belief and Ritual, published by the University of Illinois Press, 1997, 240 pages, ISBN 0-252-06602-2 (978-0-252-06602-3), softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Glossary of Native American Flute Terms, A Brief History of the Native American Flute (2), The Breckenridge Flute

Publisher's description: Looking beyond regional barriers, An Archaeology Of The Soul offers new depths of insight into American Indian ethnography. Hall uncovers the lineage and kinship shared by Native North Americans through the perspectives of history, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, biological anthropology, linguistics, and mythology.

[Hall-RW 2001] Rachel W. Hall and Krešimir Josić. “The Mathematics of Musical Instruments”, American Mathematical Monthly, Volume 108, April 2001, pages 347–357. Original monograph is dated August 29, 2000 and is 11 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This article highlights several applications of mathematics to the design of musical instruments. In particular, we consider the physical properties of a Norwegian folk instrument called the willow flute. The willow flute relies on harmonics, rather than nger holes, to produce a scale which is related to a major scale. The pitches correspond to fundamental solutions of the one-dimensional wave equation. This "natural" scale is the jumping-o point for a discussion of several systems of scale construction - just, Pythagorean, and equal temperament - which have connections to number theory and dynamical systems and are crucial in the design of keyboard instruments. The willow flute example also provides a nice introduction to the spectral theory of partial differential equations, which explains the di erences between the sounds of wind or stringed instruments and drums.

[Hallman 2011] Hallman DM, Olsson EM, von Schéele B, Melin L, Lyskov E. “Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback in Subjects with Stress-related Chronic Neck Pain: A Pilot Study”, 2011, doi:10.1007/s10484-011-9147-0. Publication 21365308 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Recent studies focusing on autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunctions, together with theoretical pathophysiological models of musculoskeletal disorders, indicate the involvement of ANS regulation in development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback (BF) in increasing HRV and reducing the symptoms of different disorders characterized by ANS aberration. The study investigated the effects of resonance frequency HRV BF on autonomic regulation and perceived health, pain, stress and disability in 24 subjects with stress-related chronic neck-shoulder pain. Twelve subjects participated in 10 weekly sessions of resonant HRV BF and were compared to a control group. Subjective reports and HRV measures during relaxation and in response to a standardized stress protocol were assessed for both groups pre- and post-intervention. Group × time interactions revealed a significantly stronger increase over time in perceived health (SF-36) for the treatment group, including vitality, bodily pain and social functioning. Interactions were also seen for HRV during relaxation and reactivity to stress. The present pilot study indicates improvement in perceived health over a 10 week intervention with HRV-biofeedback in subjects with chronic neck-pain. Increased resting HRV as well as enhanced reactivity to hand grip and cold pressor tests might reflect beneficial effects on ANS regulation, and suggest that this intervention protocol is suitable for a larger controlled trial.

[Halloran 1999] John A. Halloran. Sumerian Lexicon, Version 3.0, August 11, 1999. See the Sumerian Lexicon web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Halperin 2008] David Halperin. “Musical Reconstruction of the Hurrian Material by Statistical Analysis”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2008), The British Museum, London, December 4–6, 2008, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2008, pages 29–32. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Halpern 1997] Abraham M. Halpern (born 1914); Amy Miller and Margaret Langdon (editors). Kar'uk: Native Accounts of the Quechan Mourning Ceremony, University of California publications in linguistics, Volume 128, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1997, xix + 338 pages, ISBN 0-520-09818-8 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Indigenous North American Flutes

[Halpern-I 1986] Ida Halpern (field recordings and annotations). Haida — Indian Music of the Pacific Northwest, Folkways Records and Service Corp., FE 4119, 1986, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Reissued in [Halpern-I 2006]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Halpern-I 2006] Ida Halpern (field recordings and annotations). Haida — Indian Music of the Pacific Northwest, Smithsonian / Folkways Archival Series, Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings, FE 4119, 2 CD set, 29 tracks, 2006, UPC 0-93070-41192-0, ASIN B00242VZJC, audio CD. Source archive: Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Reissue of [Halpern-I 1986]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: The music of the Haida tribe in the Pacific Northwest is shrouded in secrecy from outsiders because of its sacred role in society. However, musicologist Ida Halpern managed to collect a number of recordings of Haida songs from tribespeople eager to keep their heritage alive. This album contains songs about love, celebration, war, drinking, and dialogue between Halpern and the singers.

[Hambly 1937] Wilfrid Dyson Hambly (1886–1962) and Paul Sidney Martin (1899–1974). Source Book for African Anthropology, Part 1, Publications of Field Museum of Natural History, Publication 394, Anthropological Series, Volume 26, published by the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, 1937, 953 pages. Publication sourcebookforafr261hamb on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hamer 1996] M. Hamer. “Haunting Tunes from Ghostly Players”, New Scientist, Volume 151, Number 2048, 1996, page 12. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hamilton 1953] Elsie Hamilton. The Modes of Ancient Greece, 1953, 20 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hamilton-A 1896] Augustus Hamilton (1854–1913). The Art Workmanship of the Maori Race in New Zealand: A Series of Illustrations from Specially Taken Photographs, with Descriptive Notes and Essays on the Canoes, Habitations, Weapons, Ornaments, and Dress of the Maoris, Together with Lists of Words in the Maori Language Used in Relation to the Subjects, Volumes 1-5, published by Fergusson & Mitchell, 1896, 438 pages. Publication cu31924029890153 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hamilton-AH 1945] Anna Heuermann Hamilton. “The Music of the North American Indians”, The Etude Music Magazine, July 1945, 3 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hammarlund 2005] Anders Hammarlund, Tord Olsson, and Elisabeth Özdalga (editors). Sufism, Music and Society in Turkey and the Middle East, Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul, Transactions Volume 10, Papers Read at a Conference Held at the Swedish Research Institute, Istanbul, Turkey, November 27–29, 1997, 2005, 165 pages, ISBN 0-203-34697-1 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of the Middle East

[Hammerer 1890] John Daniel Hammerer; Paul Leicester Ford (editor). An Account of a Plan for Civilizing the North American Indians, Proposed in the Eighteenth Century, 1890, retrieved March 30, 2010. Publication accountofplanfor00hammuoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hammond 1991] Norman Hammond (editor). Cuello: An Early Maya Community in Belize, published by the Cambridge University Press, 1991, xxi + 260 pages, ISBN 0-521-38422-2, hardcover. Reissued in [Hammond 2009]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in the Americas

Abstract: The Maya built one of the great ancient civilizations in the New World, between AD 250 and 900. Famed for over 150 years for its cities buried deep in the Central American jungle, the origins of Maya culture have, nevertheless, remained obscure until quite recently. Over the past two decades, the Preclassic origins of complex society in the Maya Area have been established by a series of innovative research projects. Among the best known of these is the study of Cuello, the earliest known ancient Maya settlement. Excavations at Cuello over several seasons from 1975 to 1987 have yielded an unmatched picture of a pioneer tropical forest community. In this timely volume the origins of Maya civilization 1500 years ago are documented with detailed evidence on the environment, economy, buildings, crafts, ritual practices, burials and artistic imagery.

[Hammond 1994] Norman Hammond. Ancient Maya Civilization, Fifth Edition, published by the Cambridge University Press and Rutgers University Press, 1994. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in the Americas

[Hammond 1995] Norman Hammond, Amanda Clarke, and Sara Donaghey. “The Long Goodbye: Middle Preclassic Maya Archaeology at Cuello, Belize”, Latin American Antiquity, Volume 6, Number 2, published by the Society for American Archaeology, June 1995, pages 120–128. Publication 972147 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in the Americas

Abstract: Completed excavations at this important Preclassic Maya site have produced 350 m2 of Middle Preclassic (1200-400 B.C.) deposits dug to bedrock; a continuous section 47 m long through the Preclassic deposits documents the architectural history of the site. Nine more Middle Preclassic burials, the remains of earth- and plaster-floored houses with associated yard surfaces, and a chultun chamber containing well-preserved plant remains document economic and ritual behavior in the Swasey and Bladen phases (1200-650 B.C.).
Translation: La fnalizacion de las excavaciones en este importante sitio preclasico maya ha producido un area total de 350 m2 de yacimientos del Preclasico Medio (1200-400 A. C.) excavados hasta roca firme; una seccion continua de 47 m de largo que corta los yacimientos preclasicos documental a historia arquitectonica del sitio. Nueve entierrosa dicionales del Precldisico Medio, los restos de casas con pisos de tierra o de yeso con asociados a superfcies de patio, y una camara tipo chultun que contenia restos botanicos bien preservados, documentan actividad economicay ritual durante las fases Swasey y Bladen (1200-650 A.C.).

[Hammond 2009] Norman Hammond (editor). Cuello: An Early Maya Community in Belize, published by the Cambridge University Press, 2009, 284 pages, ISBN 0-521-11767-4 (978-0-521-11767-8), softcover. Reissue of [Hammond 1991]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hammond-GP 1940] George P. Hammond and Agapito Rey (editors and translation). Narratives of the Coronado Expedition 1540-1542, Coronado Historical Series, Volume 1, published by the University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1940. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Flute and Flute Music of the North American Indians (2)

[HannaPladdy 2011] Brenda Hanna-Pladdy and Alicia MacKay. “The Relation Between Instrumental Musical Activity and Cognitive Aging”, Neuropsychology, Volume 25, Number 3, April 4, 2011, pages 378–386, doi:10.1037/a0021895 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract:
Objective: Intensive repetitive musical practice can lead to bilateral cortical reorganization. However, whether musical sensorimotor and cognitive abilities transfer to nonmusical cognitive abilities that are maintained throughout the life span is unclear. In an attempt to identify modifiable lifestyle factors that may potentially enhance successful aging, we evaluated the association between musical instrumental participation and cognitive aging.
Method: Seventy older healthy adults (ages 60–83) varying in musical activity completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. The groups (nonmusicians, low and high activity musicians) were matched on age, education, history of physical exercise, while musicians were matched on age of instrumental acquisition and formal years of musical training. Musicians were classified in the low (1–9 years) or high (>10 years) activity group based on years of musical experience throughout their life span.
Results: The results of this preliminary study revealed that participants with at least 10 years of musical experience (high activity musicians) had better performance in nonverbal memory (η2 = .106), naming (η2 = .103), and executive processes (η2 = .131) in advanced age relative to nonmusicians. Several regression analyses evaluated how years of musical activity, age of acquisition, type of musical training, and other variables predicted cognitive performance.
Conclusions: These correlational results suggest a strong predictive effect of high musical activity throughout the life span on preserved cognitive functioning in advanced age. A discussion of how musical participation may enhance cognitive aging is provided along with other alternative explanations.

[Hardin 2003] James Hardin. “The Archive of Folk Culture at 75: A National Project with Many Workers”, Folklife Center News, Volume 25, Number 2, Spring 2003, pages 3–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

[Harding 1999] A. F. Harding (editor). Experiment and Design. Archaeological Studies in Honour of John Coles, published by Oxbow Books, Oxford, England, 1999, ISBN-13 978-1-900188-76-0 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hargreaves 1995] David J. Hargreaves, Chris Comber and Ann Colley. “Effects of Age, Gender, and Training on Musical Preferences of British Secondary School Students”, Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume 43, Number 3, Fall 1995, pages 242–250, doi:10.2307/3345639. Publication 3345639 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The effects of age, gender, and musical training on preference ratings for 12 musical style categories were investigated in a sample of 278 British secondary school pupils drawn from the 11–12- and 15–16-year-old age-groups. There were no significant age x gender interactions, but a number of significant main effects were found. There was a general decline in liking with age, and this was particularly apparent for “serious” styles, although those “popular” styles for which the same effect was present showed considerably higher levels of liking at both age levels. Broadly speaking, girls expressed liking for a wider range of styles than did boys, especially “serious” ones, although this might be better expressed as a lower level of disliking. This could be attributable to girls' higher level of training a variable that was positively associated with liking for “serious” styles across the sample as a whole. The implications of these findings are discussed, and directions for further research are suggested.

[Harmat 2010] László Harmat and Töres Theorell. “Heart Rate Variability During Singing and Flute Playing”, Music and Medicine, Volume 2, Number 1, January 2010, pages 10–17, doi:10.1177/1943862109354598 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The authors tested five professional singers' and four flute players' physiological performance arousal (4 male, 5 female) by means of Actiheart® recordings. In addition, they used a 5-point Likert-type scale to assess the subjects' nervousness. Every musician performed a relaxed and a strenuous piece with (concert) and without (rehearsal) an audience. A one-way analysis of variance in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) showed a significant difference across the four different conditions (easy/rehearsal, strenuous/rehearsal, easy/concert, and strenuous/concert) within subjects. There were no significant differences in heart rate reaction patterns between subjects. With regard to HRV, on the other hand, low frequency (LF) power and high frequency (HF) power reaction patterns in the four situations varied significantly between subjects. In addition, the authors found a significantly lower LF power during the concert in those who were nervous before the concert compared with those who were not nervous.

[Harmat 2011] László Harmat, Fredrik Ullén, Örjan de Manzano, Erik Olsson, Ulf Elofsson, Bo von Schéele, and Töres Theorell. “Heart Rate Variability During Piano Playing: A Case Study of Three Professional Solo Pianists Playing a Self-Selected and a Difficult Prima Vista Piece”, Music and Medicine, Volume 3, Number 2, April 2011, pages 102–107, doi:10.1177/1943862110387158 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The aim of the study was to examine self-rated emotions and psychophysiological reactions during two contrasting professional experiences of piano playing. Three internationally well-known professional solo pianists were the study participants. They performed a self-selected piece and a difficult prima vista piece. Heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV) as well as breathing were measured. Psychological reactions were assessed before and after the performance by means of visual analogue scale (VAS). There was a higher HR during the self-selected piece than during the prima vista piece. Respiration rate on the other hand was higher and End tidal CO2 (ETCO2) was lower during the prima vista piece. The difficult playing was characterized by an increase in breathing and by an initially more pronounced (but not sustained) activation of the vagal nerve as well as a more sustained activation of the sympathetic system in the assigned piece than in the self-selected situation. In this study of 3 cases, there were indications that professional piano players may activate the parasympathetic system during a cognitively demanding task. Further studies should investigate the physiological differences between attention with mental effort and effortless attention during music performances.

[Harmless 2008] William Harmless. Mystics, published by the Oxford University Press, 2008, 350 pages, ISBN 0-19-530039-4 (978-0-19-530039-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Poetry by Rumi

[Harmon 2009] Katherine Harmon. “Researchers Uncover 1.5 Million-Year-Old Footprints”, Scientific American, February 26, 2009, retrieved August 2009. See the Scientific American web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Evolution of Music - Flutopedia.com

[Harmon-Jones 2009] Eddie Harmon-Jones and Jennifer S. Beer (editors). Methods in Social Neuroscience, published by the Guilford Press, New York, 2009, 353 pages, ISBN 1-60623-040-9 (978-1-60623-040-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harper 1992] Prudence Oliver Harper, Joan Aruz, Françoise Tallon, and Metropolitan Museum of Art (editors). The Royal City of Susa: Ancient Near Eastern Treasures in the Louvre, Illustrated Edition, published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1992, 316 pages, ISBN 0-87099-651-7 (978-0-87099-651-1). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's summary: The ancient city of Susa (biblical Shushan) lay at the edge of the Iranian plateau, not far from the great cities of Mesopotamia. A strategically located and vital center, Susa absorbed diverse influences and underwent great political fluctuations during the several thousand years of its history. When French archaeologists began to excavate its site in the nineteenth century, the astonishing abundance of finds greatly expanded our understanding of the ancient Near East. The artifacts were taken to Paris through diplomatic agreement and became a centerpiece of the Louvre's great collection of Near Eastern antiquities. These works are rarely loaned, but a remarkable selection that includes many undisputed masterpieces, brought to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for exhibition, is presented in this comprehensive publication. Susa was settled about 4000 B.C. and has yielded striking pottery finds from that prehistoric period. A rich production followed of objects for daily use, ritual, and luxury living, finely carved in various materials or fashioned of clay. Monumental sculpture was made in stone or bronze, and dramatic friezes were composed of brilliantly glazed bricks. Among the discoveries are tiny, intricately carved cylinder seals and splendid jewelry. Clay balls marked with symbols offer fascinating testimony to the very beginnings of writing; clay tablets from later periods bearing inscriptions in cuneiform record political history, literature, business transactions, and mathematical calculations. A very important group of finds from Susa is made up of objects brought back as booty from conquests in Mesopotamia. These works, many of them the royal monuments of Akkadian and Babylonian monarchs - for instance, the great stele of Naram-Sin - are among the best known of all objects from the ancient Near East. Altogether, the exhibition presents more than two hundred objects found at Susa, produced over a period of about 3500 years. They come from all periods of the site's settlement, from it earliest history to its adornment as a major city of the opulent Achaemenid Persian empire. Eighteen French and American scholars have contributed essays to this volume on subjects that include the history of art in ancient Iran from prehistoric settlement through the Achaemenid period; the history of the excavations at Susa; the development of writing; seals and sealings; royal and religious structures at Susa; objects brought from Mesopotamia; brick decoration; popular art; and cuneiform texts. Recent results of ongoing research into the archaeology of Susa are discussed. Analyses of specific techniques are included as well as reports on the conservation of objects. Each work in the exhibition is illustrated and fully described, with references to relevant publications.

[Harrington 1933] Mark Raymond Harrington. Gypsum Cave, Nevada — Report of the Second Sessions Expedition, Southwest Museum Papers, Number 8, published by Southwest Museum, Highland Park, Los Angeles, April 1933, 197 pages, softcover. Reissued in [Harrington 1963]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seven citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (5), Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - P (2)

[Harrington 1940] Mark Raymond Harrington. “Man and Beast in Gypsum Cave”, The Desert Magazine, Volume 3, Number 6, April 1940, pages 3–5 and 34. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - P (2)

[Harrington 1963] Mark Raymond Harrington. Gypsum Cave, Nevada — Report of the Second Sessions Expedition, Southwest Museum Papers, Number 8, published by Southwest Museum, Highland Park, Los Angeles, 1963, 197 pages, ISBN 0-916561-23-2 (978-0-916561-23-9), ASIN 0916561232, softcover. Reissue of [Harrington 1933]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harrington-JP 1928] John P. Harrington and Helen H. {Heffron} Roberts (1888–1985). “Picurís Children's Stories, with Texts and Songs”, Forty-Third Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1925-1926, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1928, pages 293–397, retrieved March 15, 2010. Publication annualreportofbu43smithso on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harrington-JP 1942] John P. Harrington. Culture Element Distributions: XIX - Central California Coast, Anthropological Records, Volume 7, Number 1, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, 1942, pages 1–46. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harris 1918] William Richard Harris (1847–1923). Prehistoric Man in America, printed by the Ryerson Press, Toronto, Ontario, 1918, 115 pages, hardcover. Reprinted from Archaeological reports of the Ontario provincial museum, 1913-1918. Publication prehistoricmanin00harruoft on Archive.org (open access). See the Archive.org web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harris-C 2016] Craig Harris. Heartbeat, Warble, and the Electric Powwow: American Indian Music, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, May 2016, 280 pages, ISBN 0-8061-5168-4 (978-0-8061-5168-7), softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Despite centuries of suppression and oppression, American Indian music survives today as a profound cultural force. Heartbeat, Warble, and the Electric Powwow celebrates in depth the vibrant soundscape of Native North America, from the “heartbeat” of intertribal drums and “warble” of Native flutes to contemporary rock, hip-hop, and electronic music. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with musicians, producers, ethnographers, and record-label owners, author and musician Craig Harris conjures an aural tapestry in which powwow drums and end-blown woodwinds resound alongside operatic and symphonic strains, jazz and reggae, country music, and blues.

[Harris-LR 1996] Linda R. Harris. Horn Playing and Blood Pressure, The Lancet, Volume 348, Issue 9033, October 12, 1996, page 1042, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)64982-3 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harris-R 2009] Richard Harris. A Little Flute Music To Warm The Cave, National Public Radio, All Things Considered, June 24, 2009, total time 3:52. See the story on the NPR web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Harrison 1971] Lou Harrison (1917–2003). The Tuning of the Babylonian Harp, Recorded date February 12, 1957, total time 26:08, retrieved December 9, 2011. Publication AM_1971_02_12 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Harrison discusses the recent translation of an ancient Sumerian cuneiform tablet, in which the musical scale used by the Babylonian’s is described. This discovery has pushed back the origin of musical theory by at least 1,500 years. Harrison accompanies his talk with auditory illustrations of ancient scales and other plectrum pleasantries. The musical knowledge developed by the ancient Babylonians was passed on and refined by Pythagorus and Ptolemy and eventually influenced the Western musical tradition.

[Hart 1852] John S. Hart (editor). The Iris, an Illuminated Souvenir for 1852, published by Lippincott, Grambo & Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1852. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Harvey 1997] Arthur Harvey. The LIND Method of Stress Reduction Through Music, The LIND Institute, 1997, total time 113 minutes, ASIN B0016BIGXK, set of audio CDs (two). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Reducing stress and maintaining health and wellness, this 2-CD set contains two beautiful recordings, one by Bach, the other Handel. The selections have been scientifically selected and meticulously sequenced for stress reduction and for a beautiful listening experience by Dr. Arthur Harvey, an internationally recognized expert on music in health care and education.

Bach for the Morning slowly and gently increases your energy level as you wake up, gradually energizing you during the critical first hour of your day. It is also wonderful to play any time during the day when you need a little tension-free get-up-and-go.

Handel for the Evening starts out at a quick tempo to match the quickened pace that you've often arrived at by the end of a hectic day (or often even earlier in the day), gradually slowing and thus gently moving your energy level and mood to a relaxed and calm state, which is ideal for the evening or any time during the day when you need relief from stress and wish to slowly wind down with no jarring effects.
Beats per minute: Bach recording: 50–120; Handel recording: 120–50.

[Hashemi 2008] Vahid Hashemi and Sara Ramezani. Inducing Meter for a Rhythm and Measures for Rhythm Complexity, February 13, 2008, 10 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: We have tried to identify different problems in music cognition and and algorithmic methods and mathematical ideas for approaching these problems. The main theme was working on rhythms, and particularly focusing on syncopation and other elements that make a rhythm sound interesting, or complex.

Two rather independent problems have been dealt with. The first is implementing an algorithm for finding the syncopation of a rhythm and using it to induce the meter for a given rhythm. The second problem is that of measuring the complexity of a given rhythm based on factors such as the amount of repetition and syncopation. These problems will be dealt with in the following sections.

[Hasselbach 2005] Rebecca Hasselbach. Sargonic Akkadian — A Historical and Comparative Study of the Syllabic Texts, published by Otto Harrassowitz Verlag, 2005, 292 pages, ISBN 3-447-05172-8 (978-3-447-05172-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Hassett 2007] Afton L. Hassett, Diane C. Radvanski, Evgeny G. Vaschillo, Bronya Vaschillo, Leonard H. Sigal, Maria Katsamanis Karavidas, Steven Buyske, and Paul M. Lehrer. “A Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) Biofeedback in Patients with Fibromyalgia”, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Volume 32, 2007, pages 1–10, doi:10.1007/s10484-006-9028-0. Publication 17219062 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a non-inflammatory rheumatologic disorder characterized by musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, depression, cognitive dysfunction and sleep disturbance. Research suggests that autonomic dysfunction may account for some of the symptomatology of FM. An open label trial of biofeedback training was conducted to manipulate suboptimal heart rate variability (HRV), a key marker of autonomic dysfunction.
Methods: Twelve women ages 18-60 with FM completed 10 weekly sessions of HRV biofeedback. They were taught to breathe at their resonant frequency (RF) and asked to practice twice daily. At sessions 1, 10 and 3-month follow-up, physiological and questionnaire data were collected.
Results: There were clinically significant decreases in depression and pain and improvement in functioning from Session 1 to a 3-month follow-up. For depression, the improvement occurred by Session 10. HRV and blood pressure variability (BPV) increased during biofeedback tasks. HRV increased from Sessions 1-10, while BPV decreased from Session 1 to the 3 month follow-up.
Conclusions: These data suggest that HRV biofeedback may be a useful treatment for FM, perhaps mediated by autonomic changes. While HRV effects were immediate, blood pressure, baroreflex, and therapeutic effects were delayed. This is consistent with data on the relationship among stress, HPA axis activity, and brain function.

[Hassrick 1964] Royal B. Hassrick. The Sioux: Life and Customs of a Warrior Society, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, 1964. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Flute and Flute Music of the North American Indians (2)

[Haury 1940] Emil W. Haury (1904–1992). Excavations in the Forestdale Valley, East-Central Arizona, University of Arizona Bulletin, Volume 11, Number 4, Tuscon, Arizona, 1940, 147 pages, 12 plates, 44 figures, 3 maps, ASIN B0007G3OHS. With appendix, the skeletal remains of the Bear Ruin, Norman E. Gabel. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Haury 1950] Emil W. Haury. The Stratigraphy and Archeology of Ventana Cave, Arizona, published by the University of Arizona Press, Tuscon, Arizona, 1950, 599 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Hauser 1978] Michael Hauser. “Inuit Songs from Southwest Baffin Island in Cross-cultural Context”, Études Inuit Studies, Volume 2, Numbers 1 and 2, 1978, issue Number 1, pages 55–83, issue Number 2 pages 71–105. ISSN 0701-1008. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hausler 1960] Alexander Häusler. “Neue Funde steinzeitlicher Musikinstrumente in Osteuropa «New finds of Stone Age Musical Instruments in Eastern Europe»”, Acta Musicologica, Volume 32, Fasc. 2/3, published by the International Musicological Society, in German, April–September 1960, pages 151–155. Publication 931665 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: Prähistorische Musikinstrumente sind wichtige kulturgeschichtliche Zeugnisse. Die ältesten Beispiele verdienen eine ganz besondere Beachtung, da aus den weit zuruckliegenden Perioden menschlicher Entwicklung nur ein geringes Quellenmaterial vorliegt.
Translation: Prehistoric music instruments are important to cultural history. The oldest examples deserve special attention, dating as far back to early in the periods of human development, present a low quality of source material.

[Hawk 2002] Samuel Hawk. The Old Indian, published by the San Juan Music Group, Delta Music GmbH, 13-674, 2 tracks, 2002, total time 59:00, EAN 4-006408-136743. Contains 2 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hawkins 1868] Sir John Hawkins (1719–1789). A General History of the Science and Practice of Music, Volume 1, 1868. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hawley 1937] Florence Hawley. “Kokopelli, of the Prehistoric Southwestern Pueblo Pantheon”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 39, Number 4 (Part 1), published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., 1937, pages 644–646. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hays 2011] Jeffrey Hays. Jiahu Culture and the First Rice, Wine and Flutes in China, Updated February 2011, retrieved October 4, 2011. Original copyright 2008. Jiahu Culture and the First Rice, Wine and Flutes in China Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hays-Gilpin 1992] Kelley Ann Hays. Anasazi Ceramics as Text and Tool: Toward a Theory of Ceramic Design "Messaging", Ph.D. dissertation – University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, 1992, 415 pages. See the University of Arizona Campus Repository web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This study illustrates the importance of finding out whether painted ceramics represent the total repertoire of decorated artifacts that are expected to carry social information. Painted designs on pottery are the focus of study because (1) painted decoration has had great importance in Southwest archaeology for studying social interaction, cultural affiliation, and fine-grained chronology based on stylistic change, and (2) painted decoration is less constrained by technology and intended vessel function than other attributes, and is most free to vary for social or ideological reasons. Two assumptions underlying previous work on ceramic design "messaging" are examined. First, are ceramics the most important medium for carrying social information? Second, is ethnicity the kind of information they are most likely to carry? These questions are addressed in a case study from the American Southwest. Decorated pottery, baskets, textiles, figurines, and rock art from the seventh century Basketmaker III period occupation of rock shelters in the Prayer Rock District, northeastern Arizona are examined. Comparison of design structure and content across these different media reveals two decorative styles, one for the portable household artifacts and one for rock art. In this case, pottery does not carry the full range of potential social information signalled by applied designs. The contexts of these two decorative styles are suggested by considering aspects of artifact function, design visibility, spatial distribution of artifacts, rock art, and architecture, together with hypotheses about gender differentiation and community organization. It is concluded that for the Prayer Rock Basketmakers, pottery decoration may have carried messages that had more to do with gender than ethnicity.

[Hays-Gilpin 1998] Kelley Hays-Gilpin, Ann Cordy Deegan, and Elizabeth Ann Morris. Prehistoric Sandals from Northeastern Arizona: The Earl H. Morris and Ann Axtell Morris Research, Anthropological Papers of the University of Arizona, paper #62, published by the University of Arizona Press, Tuscon, Arizona, 1998, 150 pages, ISBN 0-8165-1801-7 (978-0-8165-1801-2). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

Publisher's description: During the late 1920s and early 1930s, archaeologists Earl and Ann Axtell Morris discovered an abundance of sandals from the Basketmaker II and III through Pueblo III periods while excavating rockshelters in northeastern Arizona. These densely twined sandals made of yucca yarn were intricately crafted and elaborately decorated, and Earl Morris spent the next 25 years overseeing their analysis, description, and illustration. This is the first full published report on this unusual find, which remains one of the largest collections of sandals in Southwestern archaeology. This monograph offers an integrated archaeological and technical study of the footwear, providing for the first time a full-scale analysis of the complicated weave structures they represent. Following an account by anthropologist Elizabeth Ann Morris of her parents' research, textile authority Ann Cordy Deegan gives an overview of prehistoric Puebloan sandal types and of twined sandal construction techniques, revealing the subtleties distinguishing Basketmaker sandals of different time periods. Anthropologist Kelley Ann Hays-Gilpin then discusses the decoration of twined sandals and speculates on the purpose of such embellishment.

[Hays-Gilpin 1998a] Kelley Hays-Gilpin. “Excavation and Dating of the Prayer Rock Caves”, Contained in [Hays-Gilpin 1998], Chapter 3, 1998, pages 29–36. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutopedia Revision History, Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

[Hays-Gilpin 2004] Kelley Ann Hays-Gilpin. ““Maidens” and Flute Players in the Southwest”, contained in [Hays-Gilpin 2004a], 2004, pages 127–146. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hays-Gilpin 2004a] Kelley Ann Hays-Gilpin. Ambiguous Images: Gender and Rock Art, published by AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, California, 2004, 256 pages, ISBN-13 978-0-7591-0065-7, ASIN 0759100659, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: A significant contribution to the relatively unexplored field of gender in rock art, this volume contains information for those interested in past gender systems. Hays-Gilpin argues that art is both a product of its physical and social environment and a tool of influence in shaping behavior and ideas within a society. Rock art is often one of the strongest lines of evidence available to scholars in understanding ritual practices, gender roles, and ideological constructs of prehistoric peoples.

[Hays-TE 1986] Terence E. Hays. “Sacred Flutes, Fertility, and Growth in the Papua New Guinea Highlands”, Anthropos, Band 81, 1986, pages 435–453. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Haywood 1951] Charles Haywood. A Bibliography of North American Folklore and Folksong, published by Greenburg, New York, 1951, xxx + 1292 pages. Reissued in [Haywood 1961]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Haywood 1961] Charles Haywood. A Bibliography of North American Folklore and Folksong, Two Volumes, Second Revised Edition, published by Dover Publications, New York, 1961, xxx + 1301 pages. Reissue of [Haywood 1951]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Healy 2010] Paul F. Healy, Carrie L. Dennett, Mary Hill Harris, and Arnd Adje Both. “A Musical Nature: Pre-Columbian Ceramic Flutes of Northeast Honduras”, contained in [Eichmann 2010], 2010, pages 189–212. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Zusammenfassung: Archäologen sind gerade damit befasst, eine vorkolumbische Kulturgeschichte für den nordöstlichen Teil von Honduras zu schreiben. Forschungen in dieser isolierten, fernen Region Zentralamerikas haben bereits zu einem begrenzten Verstehen materieller Hinterlassenschaften und der lokalen kulturellen Prozesse geführt. Fest steht, dass hier eine große kulturelle Grenzregion begann bzw. endete, die während der Zeit des ersten europäischen Kontakts in der ersten Hälfte des 16. Jhds. dünn von indigenen Gruppen bewohnt, über mehrere Jahrhunderte zuvor aber in unterschiedlich intensivem Austausch mit den in nordöstlicher Richtung florierenden Maya-Gesellschaften Guatemalas und den in südöstlicher Richtung gelegenen Isthmo-Kolumbischen Kulturen stand. Die örtliche Bevölkerung, die möglicherweise mit den Payasprachigen Pech in Verbindung gebracht werden kann, stellte während der letzten beiden vorkolumbischen Phasen von Nordost-Honduras (Transitional Selin und Cocal, ca. 800–1530 n. Chr.) handmodellierte Flöten aus Keramik her, die bislang von der Forschung unberücksichtigt sind. In diesem Beitrag behandeln wir eine kleine Auswahl dieser Instrumente, die von den Bay Islands vor der Honduranischen Küste stammen.
Translation: Archaeologists have just begun to write a pre-Columbian culture history for the northeastern part of Honduras. Research in this isolated, remote region of Central America has already led to a limited understanding of material legacies and the local cultural processes. It is clear that a great cultural border region began and ended here. During the time of first European contact in the first half of the 16th century, sparsely inhabited by indigenous groups over several centuries earlier, but in different intensive exchange with the booming north-east of Guatemala and the Mayan societies located in a south-easterly direction Isthmo-Columbian cultures was. The local population, which may possibly be associated with the Payasprachigen pitch, presented during the last two phases of pre-Columbian Northeast Honduras (Transitional Selin and Cocal, about 800-1530 AD) hand modeled ceramic flutes ago, the have so far been ignored by research. In this paper we treat a small selection of these instruments, which originate from the Bay Islands off the Honduran coast.

[Heard 1969] J. Norman Heard (born 1922). The Black Frontiersmen: Adventures of Negroes among American Indians, 1528-1918, published by John Day Co., New York, 1969, 128 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heathwaite 2010] Andrew Heathwaite. Gallery of Just Intervals, Sepember 14, 2010, retrieved January 28, 2015. Gallery of Just Intervals Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heathwaite 2011] Andrew Heathwaite. Overtone Scales, October 17, 2011, retrieved January 28, 2015. Overtone Scales Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heckroth 1996] Jim Heckroth. Complete MIDI 1.0 Detailed Specification, published by the MIDI Manufacturers Association, 1996, 297 pages, ISBN 0-9728831-0-X Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Octave Notation

[Hedden 1981] Steven K. Hedden. “Music Listening Skills and Music Listening Preferences”, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Number 65, Winter 1981, pages 16–26. Publication 40317638 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heichelheim 1952] F. M. Heichelheim. “Toronto Scholar Believes Music Led to Alphabet”, The Globe and Mail, Toronto, Canada, February 22, 1952, pages 1–2. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heick 1953] Essie Parrish (performer); William Heick and Gordon Mueller (writers and directors). Pomo Shaman, sponsored by the University of California, 1953, run time 22:26. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

Description by Emily Thomas, 2013: POMO SHAMAN documents the second and final night of a Kashaya Pomo healing ceremony lead by Essie Parrish (1903-1979), a spiritual, cultural and political head of the Kashaya Pomo community and one of the only southwestern Pomo sucking doctor who still practiced this ancient form of doctoring. Along with her good friend, Cache Creek Pomo medicine woman and fellow basket weaver Mabel McKay, Parrish would be the last of the sucking doctors in California—and probably the last in the entire country.

[Heidel 1963] Alexander Heidel. The Gilgamesh Epic and Old Testament Parallels, First Phoenix Edition, published by The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, 1963, 280 pages. first published in 1946. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia (3)

[Heidsiek 1966] Ralph George Heidsiek (born 1929). Music of the Luiseño Indians of Southern California: A Study of Music in Indian Culture with Relation to a Program in Music Education, Ph.D. dissertation – University of California, Los Angeles, 1966, xiv + 452 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Summary from [Siva 2004], page 5: Describes material taken from archival sources, a good deal of which was sacred. There were no personal interviews with Native musicians

[Heimpel 2011] Wolfgang Heimpel and Gabriella Frantz-Szabó (editors). Strings and Threads — A Celebration of the Work of Anne Draffkorn Kilmer, published by Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, Indiana, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heinrich 1977] June Sark Heinrich. “Native Americans: What Not to Teach”, contained in [RSRCE 1977], 1977. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Native American Flute - Cultural Considerations for Facilitators

Author's description: Native people always wear feathers or headdresses; they frequently brandish tomahawks; they live in tipis; the women usually have babies on their backs; the men are fierce and violent; they lurk behind trees; they spend much time dancing on one leg; and their existence is dependent on the proximity of cowboys. They are not men, women and children, but "braves", "squaws", and "papooses". Despite the fact that they have no relation at all to many Native Peoples, these stereotypes commonly appear in children's books to distinguish Native Americans from other people. With distorted, unreal images they degrade Native People and cultures and reinforce and perpetuate racism. This study of some 70 picture books for children ten and under gives specific examples of prevalent stereotypes and how they are reflected in both illustrations and text. The harm of such distortions is discussed and guidelines are listed for illustrators and editors to use in avoiding stereotypes. Some of the classroom activities suggested include role play showing how the Indians repeatedly gave up their land to settlers, and discussions conducted on the wisdom and harmony with nature which underlies many Native American customs. The book concludes with a list of classroom "don'ts" and a section on how stereotypes may be unlearned.

[Heins 1976] Ernst Heins. “On Jaap Kunst's Music in Java”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 20, Number 1, January 1976, pages 97–101. Publication 850823 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heizer 1965] R. F. Heizer and M. A. Whipple (editors). The California Indians: A Source Book, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1965. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heizer 1978] Robert F. Heizer (volume editor); William C. Sturtevant (general editor). Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 8: California, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C., 1978, 816 pages, ISBN 0-16-004574-6 (978-0-16-004574-5). See the Handbook overview on Smithsonian Institute web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: 72 chapters on Indians of California.

[Heizer 1981] Robert F. Heizer and Thodora Kroeber (editors). Ishi: The Last Yahi — A Documentary History, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, 1981, 244 pages, ISBN 0-520-04366-9, softcover. Library of Congress call number 76-19966. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Helm 1981] June Helm (volume editor); William C. Sturtevant (general editor). Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 6: Subarctic, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C., 1981, 837 pages, ISBN 0-16-004578-9 (978-0-16-004578-3). See the Handbook overview on Smithsonian Institute web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: 66 chapters on Indians from interior Alaska to Labrador.

[Helmholtz 1912] Hermann L. F. Helmholtz (1821–1894), M.D.; Alexander J. Ellis (translator) (1814–1890). On the Sensations of Tone as a Physiological Basis for the Theory of Music, Fourth Edition, published by Longmans, Green, and Co., London, New York, Bombay, and Calcutta, 1912, 575 pages. translated from the Fourth German edition of 1877. First German Edition published in 1863. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Octave Notation, Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[Helvaci 2008] Zeynep Helvacı. Lirin Tarixi: Eski Ön Asya Ve Yunan Uyqarlıqlarında Kullanılan Lirlerin Karşılaşdırılması «Ancient Musical Instruments in Asia Minor», Doctoral dissertation – Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, Institute for Music Research, Germany, Ankara, in Turkish, 2007, 238 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Henderson 2004] A. Gwynn Henderson. “Fort Ancient Period”, contained in Volume 2 of [Pollack 2008], 2004, pages 739–902. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hendrix 2000] Tom Hendrix. If the Legends Fade, published by Country Lane Printing, Florence, AL, 2000, 235 pages, ISBN 0-9740479-0-2, hardcover. See the If the Legends Fade web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Henriques 2011] Gregg Henriques, Steven Keffer, Craig Abrahamson, and S. Jeanne Horst. “Exploring the Effectiveness of a Computer-based Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Program in Reducing Anxiety in College Students”, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Volume 36, Number 2, June 2011, pages 101–112. Publication 21533678 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Given the pervasiveness of stress and anxiety in our culture it is important to develop and implement interventions that can be easily utilized by large numbers of people that are readily available, inexpensive and have minimal side effects. Two studies explored the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program on reducing anxiety and negative mood in college students. A pilot project (n = 9) of highly anxious students revealed sizable decreases in anxiety and negative mood following utilizing the program for 4 weeks. A second study (n = 35) employing an immediate versus delayed treatment design replicated the results, although the magnitude of the impact was not quite as strong. Despite observing decreases in anxiety, the expected changes in psychophysiological coherence were not observed.

[Henry 2010] Richard Henry. Culture and the Pentatonic Scale: Exciting Information On Pentatonic Scales, Kindle Edition, published by World Wide Jazz, 2010, ASIN B0047742DI. See the Publisher's web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Henshilwood 2004] Christopher s. Henshilwood and Francesco d’Errico. “Being Modern in the Middle Stone Age: Individuals and Innovation”, chapter 14 of [Gamble 2004], 2004, 34 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Hensley 1985] Betty Austin Hensley. “Love and Legend Speak: Some Native American Flutes”, The Flutist Quarterly, Volume 11, Number 2, 1985, pages 14–21. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hensley 2002] Betty Austin Hensley. Thurlow Lieurance Indian Flutes, Second Edition, published by The Oregon Flute Store, 2002, 32 pages, ISBN 0-9719606-2-3 (978-0-9719606-2-6), softcover with audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

90 citations: Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - T (3), Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - U (3), Catalog of Native American Flutes - Documentation, Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - P (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (26), Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - S (2), Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - C (3), Anatomy of the Native American Flute, The Warble, Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - K (4), Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute, Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - M (3), Glossary of Native American Flute Terms, Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - O (8), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (26), Flute Catalog for the Native American Flute - W (3)

[Henvell 2011] Robert Henvell. Maritime New England and Eastern Canada 11000–6000 BCE, August 29, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herbermann 1913] Charles George Herbermann (chief editor) (1840–1916). The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, 15 Volumes, published by the Robert Appleton Company, April 19, 1913. Volumes originally published sequentially between 1907 and 1912. Also known as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Membertou's Three Songs - Sheet Music for Native American Flute, The Huron Carol - Sheet Music for Native American Flute, The Development of Flutes in North America

[Herman 1882] Reinhold L. Herman and Walter Satterlee. Cradle Songs of Many Nations, published by Dodd, Mead & Company, New York, 1882, ASIN B0013JVO9I. Reissued in [Herman 1975]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herman 1975] Reinhold L. Herman and Walter Satterlee. Cradle Songs of Many Nations, published by Merrimack Publishing, 1975, ASIN B000KDZ908. Reissue of [Herman 1882]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2004] Henry R. Hermann. Enjoying the Native American-Style Flute, published by Naturegraph Publisher, Inc., Happy Camp, California, 2004, 112 pages, ISBN 0-87961-271-1 (978-0-87961-271-9). See the Naturegraph web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Native American Flute - Honoring the Tradition

[Hermann 2004a] Henry R. Hermann. “Naming Native American-Style Flutes, A Silent Controversy”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 18–20. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2004b] Henry R. Hermann. “To Seal or Not to Seal the Slow Air Chamber and Flue”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 3–6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2005] Henry R. Hermann and Robert Broussard. “Using Radiographic Techniques to Study the Internal Structure of Native American Flutes”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2005, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2005, pages 6–8. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2005a] Henry R. Hermann. “Preservation and Decay of Ancient Flutes in North America”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2005, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2005, pages 27–29. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2006] Henry Hermann. “Recognizing an Early American Icon and the Origin of the Warble in Native American Fipple Flutes”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2006, Volume 3, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2006, pages 11–12. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hermann 2011] Henry R. Hermann. Making the Wind Sing: Native American Music and the Connected Breath, published by Masterwork Books, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This book is an important historical account of the music and lives of Native Americans through perilous times, with emphasis on their only melodic instrument. Dr. Hermann spent six years researching Native American music and the significance of wind instruments in their culture. The reader will discover an enormous wealth of information which covers every aspect of their music culture. Making the Wind Sing undoubtedly represents one of the most comprehensive treatments of this subject.

[Herndon 1980] Marcia Herndon. Native American Music, published by Norwood Editions, Darby, Pennsylvania, 1980, 239 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herndon 1982] Marcia Herndon. Native American Music, Second Edition, published by Norwood Editions, Darby, Pennsylvania, 1982, 232 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hertzberg 1966] Hazel W. Hertzberg. The Great Tree and the Longhouse: The Culture of the Iroquois, published by MacMillan, 1966, 122 pages, ISBN 0-02-100030-1 (978-0-02-100030-2), ASIN B0007GMRA8, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1928] George Herzog (1901–1983). “The Yuman Musical Style”, The Journal of American Folk-lore, Volume 41, published by the American Folklore Society, April–June 1928, pages 183–231. Publication 534896 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seven citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3), Names of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3)

[Herzog 1930] George Herzog. “Musica Styles in North America”, Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress of Americanists, New York, September 17, 1928, New York, 1930, pages 455–458. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1933] George Herzog. “The Collections of Phonograph Records in North America and Hawaii”, Zeitschrift für vergleichende Musikwissenschaft, Volume 1, 1933, pages 58–62. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1933a] George Herzog. “Maricopa Music”, contained in [Spier 1933], 1933, pages 271–279. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1934] George Herzog. “Speech-Melody and Primitive Music”, The Musical Quarterly, Volume 20, Number 4, published by the Oxford University Press, 1934, pages 452–466, doi:10.1093/mq/XX.4.452. Publication 738932 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Comprehensive Scale Catalog: Three-Tone Scales in Equal Temperament

Introduction: The rhythmic and melodic aspects of speech and their relation to forms of musical expression have always challenged the interest of those concerned with the theory and practice of music. Herbert Spencer (and before him J. J. Rousseau), in advancing one of the many theories about the origin of music, argued that the musical elements of speech became more pronounced under stress of emotion or in speaking at a distance. They approached a quality which ceased to be appropriate to speech as such; and thus, detached from speech, they became the nucleus of music.

[Herzog 1934a] George Herzog. “Appendix of Song Transcriptions”, contained in [Adamson 1934], 1934, pages 422–430. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1935] George Herzog. “Plains Ghost Dance and Great Basin Music”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 37, Number 3, published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., July–September 1935, pages 403–419. Publication 661963 on JSTOR (subscription access). Contains 8 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: An inquiry into the relation and stability of musical form and function finds in the Ghost Dance songs of the Plains Indians an excellent example for study. In them we have music associated with a movement definitely known to have arisen in a different setting, with the Paiute of the Great Basin. Examination of the musical material brings forth specific answers to some of the basic questions which prompt such an inquiry.

[Herzog 1935a] George Herzog. “Special Song Types in North American Indian Music”, Zeitschrift for Vergleichende Musikwissenschaft, Volume 3, 1935, pages 1–11 or 1–6 and 23–33, ASIN B001SHGV2A Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eleven citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (11)

[Herzog 1936] George Herzog. “A Comparison of Pueblo and Pima Musical Styles”, The Journal of American Folk-lore, Volume 49, Number 194, October–December 1936, pages 283–418. Note that the title is cited in some publciations as "A Comparison of Pima and Pueblo Musical Style". Publication 535645 on JSTOR (subscription access). Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

[Herzog 1938] George Herzog. “Music in the Thinking of the American Indian”, Peabody Bulletin, Series 34, Number 1, May 1938, pages 8–12. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1940] George Herzog. “The Study of Native Music in America”, Proceedings of the Eighth American Scientific Congress, Washington, D.C., May 10–18, 1940, Volume 2, Washington, D.C., May 1940, pages 203–209. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1944] George Herzog. “African Influences in North American Indian Music”, International Congress of Musicology, New York, September 11–16, 1939, contained in [Mendel 1944], 1944, pages 130–143. Publication papersreadatinte00amer on Archive.org (open access). African Influences in North American Indian Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa

Reviews Richard Keeling and Lisa Bier:
Richard Keeling: Herzog focuses on aspects of music among the Southeastern tribes which may possibly be attributed to African-American influences. This includes musical examples from the following tribes: Cherokee (4 songs), Kwakiutl (1), Pawnee (1), Iroquois (1), Pima (1), and Diegueño (1).
Lisa Bier: Exploration of possible African musical characteristics demonstrated in American Indian music, specifically in Cherokee songs. Argues that stylistic survivals in Indian songs include solo-chorus patterns that are present in some music of Indians of the southeast and Atlantic seaboard where early African Indian contact occurred.

[Herzog 1947] George Herzog. “Recent Publications on Music in the Dutch East Indies”, American Anthropologist, Volume 49, Number 2, April–June 1947, pages 299–304, doi:10.1525/aa.1947.49.2.02a00220 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Herzog 1949] George Herzog. “Salish Music”, contained in [Smith-MW 1949], 1949, pages 93–109. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hesser 2011] Barbara Hesser and Harry N. Heinemann (editors). Music as a Global Resource: Solutions for Social and Economic Issues, Third Edition, 2011, 245 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1976] Charlotte Heth (producer); Michael Moore and Lee Miller (recording engineers). Songs of Earth, Water, Fire and Sky, New World Records, 80246, 9 tracks, 1976, total time 41:50, audio CD. See the New World Records web site. Contains 9 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

Publisher's description: Music of the San Juan Pueblo, Seneca, Northern Arapaho, Northern Plains, Creek, Yurok, Navajo, Cherokee, and Southern Plains Indians

Produced and annotated by Charlotte Heth, a member of the Cherokee nation of Oklahoma and a noted ethnomusicologist.

The importance of American Indian music is found not in its impact on modern scholarship and composition but in the traditions and values it expresses to and for the Indian people. This oral tradition has survived solely because the music was too important to be allowed to die. The emphasis in this recording is on musical value: the music of the first Americans can speak for itself.

This excellent collection documents a wide swath of American Indian music recorded on location in a variety of settings in 1975, complete with a historic and musicological analysis of each piece.

[Heth 1977] Charlotte Heth (producer). Songs of Love, Luck, Animals, and Magic: Music of the Yurok and Tolowa Indians, New World Records, 80297-2, 20 tracks, 1977, total time 35:40, audio CD. See the New World Records web site. Contains 20 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1979] Charlotte Heth (producer). Oku Shareh: Turtle Dance Songs of San Juan Pueblo, New World Records, 80301-2, 4 tracks, 1979, total time 39:45, audio CD. See the New World Records web site. Contains 4 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1979a] Charlotte Heth. “Stylistic Similarities in Cherokee and Iroquois Music”, Journal of Cherokee Studies, Volume 4, 1979, pages 128–162. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1980] Charlotte Heth (editor). The Music of the American Indians, UCLA Ethnomusicology Publications. Selected Reports in Ethnomusicology, Volume 3, Number 2, 1980, 202 pages, ISBN 0-88287-012-2 (978-0-88287-012-0), spiral binding. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1992] Charlotte Heth (producer); Michael Moore (recording engineer). Powwow Songs: Music of the Plains Indians, New World Records, 80343-2, 11 tracks, CD release date December 8, 1992, total time 0:00, ASIN B00005KHFA, audio CD. Originally released 1986. See the New World Records web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1992a] Charlotte Heth (producer); Michael Moore (recording engineer). Songs and Dances of the Eastern Indians from Medicine Spring and Allegany, New World Records, 80337-2, 7 tracks, CD release date December 8, 1992, total time 0:00, UPC 0-93228-03372-1, audio CD. Originally released 1985. See the New World Records web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1993] Charlotte Heth. Native American Dance: Ceremonies and Social Traditions, published by the National Museum of the American Indian with Starwood Publishing, Inc., 1993, 208 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1997] Charlotte Heth (executive producer); Nicholas R. Spitzer and Terence Winch (producers); David Glasser (mastering engineer). Wood That Sings: Indian Fiddle Music of the Americas, National Museum of the American Indian and Smithsonian / Folkways, SFW40472, 23 tracks, 1997, total time 71:12. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site. Contains 23 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This anthology of Indian fiddle music of the Americas features performances by Indian musicians from Nova Scotia and Manitoba to North Dakota and Arizona, to Mexico, Peru, and elsewhere in Latin America. Using this most popular of instruments as a way to explore the great variety and creativity of Indian musical traditions—from chicken scratch to the indigenous Apache fiddle—this recording expresses the capacity of Native cultures to adapt and synthesize non-Native influences.

[Hickmann-E 1988] Ellen Hickmann and David W. Hughes (editors). The Archaeology of Early Music Cultures, Third international meeting of the ICTM Study Group on Music Archaeology, published by Verlag fur systematische Musikwissenschaft, Hannover, Wolfenbüttel, 1988, 353 pages, ISBN 3-922626-51-3 (978-3-922626-51-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-E 2000] Ellen Hickmann and Ricardo Eichmann (editors). Stringed Instruments in Archaeological Context, Studien zur Musikarchäologie (Studies in Music Archaeology), Volume 1, Papers from the 8th Symposium of the Study Group on Music Archaeology [ICTM] and other contributions, Limassol, Cyprus, August 26–30, 1996, Orient-Archäologie, Volume 6, published by Verlag Marie Leidorf, GmbH, Rahden, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, in German and English, 2000, 157 pages, 166 illustrations, 7 tables, ISBN 3-89646-636-4 (978-3-89646-636-5), hardcover. ISSN 1434-162X. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-E 2000a] Ellen Hickmann, Ingo Laufs, and Ricardo Eichmann (editors). Music Archaeology of Early Metal Ages, Studien zur Musikarchäologie (Studies in Music Archaeology), Volume 2, Papers from the 1st Symposium of the International Study Group on Music Archaeology, Monastery Michaelstein, Blankenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, May 18–24, 1988, Orient-Archäologie, Volume 7, published by Verlag Marie Leidorf, GmbH, Rahden, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, in German and English, 2000, 418 pages, 239 illustrations, 6 tables, 10 plates, 1 data storage medium, ISBN 3-89646-637-2 (978-3-89646-637-2), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-E 2001] Ellen Hickmann. “Archaeomusicology «Musikarchäologie», Volume 1, Second Edition”, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 2001, pages 848–854. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Hickmann-E 2002] Ellen Hickmann, Anne Draffkorn Kilmer, and Ricardo Eichmann (editors). I. The Archaeology of Sound: Origin and Organisation; II. Music Archaeology in the Aegean and Anatolia, Studien zur Musikarchäologie (Studies in Music Archaeology), Volume 3, I: Papers from the 2nd Symposium of the International Study Group on Music Archaeology; II: Papers from the Colloquium on Music Archaeology organised by the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut [Istanbul] in cooperation with the ICTM-Study Group on Music Archaeology and the Institut Français d'Archéologie [Istanbul], I: Monastery Michaelstein; II: Mimar Sinan University, Istanbul, Turkey, I: September 17–23, 2000; II: April 12–16, 1993, Orient-Archäologie, Volume 10, published by Verlag Marie Leidorf, GmbH, Rahden, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, in German and English, 2002, 678 pages, 217 illustrations, 51 tables, 79 plates, 2 data storage media, ISBN 3-89646-640-2 (978-3-89646-640-2), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-E 2004] Ellen Hickmann and Ricardo Eichmann (editors). Music-Archaeological Sources: Finds, Oral Transmission, Written Evidence, Studien zur Musikarchäologie (Studies in Music Archaeology), Volume 4, Papers from the 3rd Symposium of the International Study Group on Music Archaeology, Monastery Michaelstein, Blankenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, June 9–16, 2002, Orient-Archäologie, Volume 15, published by Verlag Marie Leidorf, GmbH, Rahden, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, in German and English, 2004, 610 pages, 419 illustrations, 5 tables, 8 diagrams, 1 supplement, 1 data storage medium, ISBN 3-89646-645-3 (978-3-89646-645-7), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-E 2006] Ellen Hickmann, Arnd Adje Both, and Ricardo Eichmann (editors). Music Archaeology in Contexts — Archaeological Semantics, Historical Implications, Socio-Cultural Connotations, Studien zur Musikarchäologie (Studies in Music Archaeology), Volume 5, Papers from the 4th Symposium of the International Study Group on Music Archaeology, Monastery Michaelstein, Blankenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, September 19–26, 2004, Orient-Archäologie, Volume 20, published by Verlag Marie Leidorf, GmbH, Rahden, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, in German and English, 2006, 493 pages, 311 illustrations, 7 tables, 13 diagrams, 1 data storage medium, ISBN 3-89646-650-X (978-3-89646-650-1), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-H 1949] M. Hans Hickmann (1908–1968). Catalogue Général des Antiquités Égyptiennes du Musée du Caire. Nos. 69201–69852 — Instruments de Musique, published by l'lnstitut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, Cairo, in French, 1949, viii + 216 pages with 116 plates. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-H 1951] Hans Hickmann. “Note on an Egyptian Wind Instrument”, Journal of the International Folk Music Council, Volume 3, published by the International Council for Traditional Music, 1951, pages 108–109, doi:10.2307/835793. Publication 835793 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hickmann-H 1952] Hans Hickmann. “The Egyptian 'Uffāṭah Flute”, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Volume 84, Issue 3–4, October 1952, pages 103–104, doi:10.1017/S0035869X00105350. Publication 25222568 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Summary: The long flute of ancient and modern Egypt is the well-known nāy (Fig. 1), so frequently represented since prehistoric times. A short flute which has a wide diameter, is the popular (Fig. 2), which has not hitherto been dealt with. The word 'uffāṭa is used in the Sharqīya province, as far, approximately, as Mīt Grhamr (west side), and means generally a short flute, but wide in diameter. The smallest 'uffāṭa is not longer than 20 cm. The instruments reproduced in Fig. 2 measure 42·3 cm., and the diameter varies between 18 and 20 mm. The longest nāy in Fig. 1 is 74·2 cm. long and 11 to 13 mm. in diameter.

[Hickmann-H 1952a] H. Hickmann. “The Antique Cross-Flute”, Acta Musicologica, Volume 24, Fasc 3/4, published by the International Musicological Society, July–December 1952, pages 108–112. Publication 931683 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Higgins 2007] Barry D. Higgins. Historical Native American Flute Archives, September 6, 2007, 6 pages, retrieved November 24, 2010. Historical Native American Flute Archives Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eighteen citations: Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute (18)

[Higgins-WM 1838] William Mullinger Higgins. The Philosophy of Sound, and History of Music, published by W. S. Orr and Co., London, 1838, 256 pages. Publication philosophyofsoun00higguoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Higham 2012] Thomas Higham, Laura Basell, Roger Jacobi, Rachel Wood, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, and Nicholas J. Conard. “Τesting Models for the Beginnings of the Aurignacian and the Advent of Figurative Art and Music: The Radiocarbon Chronology of Geißenklösterle”, Journal of Human Evolution, Volume 62, 2012, pages 664–676, doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2012.03.003 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Flutopedia Revision History, The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia, Flutopedia Image Detail: The Hohle Fels Griffon Vulture Flute

Abstract: The German site of Geißenklösterle is crucial to debates concerning the European Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition and the origins of the Aurignacian in Europe. Previous dates from the site are central to an important hypothesis, the Kulturpumpe model, which posits that the Swabian Jura was an area where crucial behavioural developments took place and then spread to other parts of Europe. The previous chronology (critical to the model), is based mainly on radiocarbon dating, but remains poorly constrained due to the dating resolution and the variability of dates. The cause of these problems is disputed, but two principal explanations have been proposed: a) larger than expected variations in the production of atmospheric radiocarbon, and b) taphonomic influences in the site mixing the bones that were dated into different parts of the site. We reinvestigate the chronology using a new series of radiocarbon determinations obtained from the Mousterian, Aurignacian and Gravettian levels. The results strongly imply that the previous dates were affected by insufficient decontamination of the bone collagen prior to dating. Using an ultrafiltration protocol the chronometric picture becomes much clearer. Comparison of the results against other recently dated sites in other parts of Europe suggests the Early Aurignacian levels are earlier than other sites in the south of France and Italy, but not as early as recently dated sites which suggest a pre-Aurignacian dispersal of modern humans to Italy byw45000 cal BP. They are consistent with the importance of the Danube Corridor as a key route for the movement of people and ideas. The new dates fail to refute the Kulturpumpe model and suggest that Swabian Jura is a region that contributed significantly to the evolution of symbolic behaviour as indicated by early evidence for figurative art, music and mythical imagery.

[Hilger 1952] Sister M. Inez Hilger. Arapaho Child Life, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 148, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1952, 253 pages + plates. Publication bulletin1481952smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Names of the Native American Flute, Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians

[Hill 1867] Alfred J. Hill. “Constantine Beltrami”, Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society for the year 1867, published by the Pioneer Printing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1867, pages 13–20. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Beltrami Flutes - The Earliest Known Wooden Native American Flute (2)

[Hill-AE 2009] Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton. “A Survey of the Old Testament”, contained in Volume 5 of [Walton-JH 2009], published by Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2009. See the Publisher's web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutopedia Image Detail: Sumerian Clay Tablet MS 2340 Describing Musical Tuning

[Hill-J 1979] Jonathan Hill. “Kamayura Flute Music: A Study of Music as Meta-Communication”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 23, Number 1, September 1979, pages 417–432. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The goal of this study is to demonstrate how musical performances in three Kamayura rituals constitute a concrete metasymbolic code for ceremonial behavior. In seeking to identify structural interrelations among the cultural belief system of the Kamayura, their flute music, and the social order of their village, it is necessary to focus on relations between relations or bundles of relations rather than one-to-one correspondences among particular mythical, musical, and social forms.

[Hill-JD 2011] J. D. Hill and J.-P. Chaumeil (editors). Burst of Breath: Indigenous Ritual Wind Instruments in Lowland South America, published by the University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Nebraska, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hille 2011] Katrin Hille, Kilian Gust, Ulrich Bitz, and Thomas Kammer. “Associations between Music Education, Intelligence, and Spelling Ability in Elementary School”, Advances in Cognitive Psychology, Volume 7, 2011, pages 1–6, doi:10.2478/v10053-008-0082-4 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Musical education has a beneficial effect on higher cognitive functions, but questions arise whether associations between music lessons and cognitive abilities are specific to a domain or general. We tested 194 boys in Grade 3 by measuring reading and spelling performance, non verbal intelligence and asked parents about musical activities since preschool. Questionnaire data showed that 53% of the boys had learned to play a musical instrument. Intelligence was higher for boys playing an instrument (p < .001). To control for unspecific effects we excluded families without instruments. The effect on intelligence remained (p < .05). Furthermore, boys playing an instrument showed better performance in spelling compared to the boys who were not playing, despite
family members with instruments (p < .01). This effect was observed independently of IQ. Our findings suggest an association between music education and general cognitive ability as well as a specific language link.

[Hirschberg 1999] Avraham Hirschberg. Luchtwervels in een blokfluit «Air Vortices in a Recorder», in Dutch, 1999, retrieved September 28, 2010. Luchtwervels in een blokfluit Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Anatomy of the Native American Flute (2), Intervals (2)

Abstract: The physical modeling of musical instruments is of great interest. Tool builders use the models to the sound of their instruments to improve the sound of music others are trying best to imitate electronically. Wind instruments are difficult to model because the characteristic tone is determined by the nonlinear dynamics of swirling air currents in the instrument. Laboratory experiments show how the air vortices behave in a flute or organ pipe.

[Hiss 2001] Susan G. Hiss, Kathleen Treole, and Andrew Stuart. “Effect of Age, Gender, and Repeated Measures on Intraoral Air Pressure in Normal Adults”, Journal of Voice, Volume 15, Number 2, 2001, pages 159–164. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The effect of age, gender, and repeated measures on intraoral air pressure (P0) was examined. Sixty adults comprised of 10 males and 10 females in each of three age groups (i.e., 20-39, 40-59, and 60-83 years) participated. P0 was assessed during voiceless stop plosive /p/ productions in repeated vowel/consonant syllables. The three medial plosives of a seven-syllable train were averaged to comprise a token. Five tokens were obtained and averaged for each of three trials. Thus each participant contributed 105 syllables and a subsequent three P0s for analyses. There was no statistically significant difference in P0 as a function of age or gender (P > 0.05). These findings support the conception that P0 remains stable throughout adulthood and is not dependent on gender. Differences in repeated measures of P0 attained statistical significance (P = 0.03), however the mean differences between trials (0.23 cm H20) were negligible and deemed to be clinically insignificant. Thus, across a short sampling session, P0 is a relatively stable measurement and does not change as a function of age or gender. Key Words: Intraoral air pressure—Aerodynamic measurement—Age—Gender—Repeated measures.

[Hockensmith 2004] Charles D. Hockensmith and Kenneth C. Carstens (editors). Current Archaeological Research in Kentucky, Volume 7, published by the Kentucky Heritage Council, Frankfort, Kentucky, 2004, 420 pages, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge 1907] Frederick Webb Hodge (editor) (1864–1956). Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico — Part 1, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 30, Part 1, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1907, 972 pages, hardcover. Publication bulletin3011907smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge 1910] Frederick Webb Hodge (editor). Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico — Part 2, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 30, Part 2, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1910, 1,221 pages, hardcover. Publication bulletin3021910smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge 1912] Frederick Webb Hodge (editor). Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico — Indian Music, September 1912. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge 1916] F. W. {Frederick Webb} Hodge (editor). Anthropological Essays Presented to William Henry Holmes, printed by the J. W. Bryan Press, Washington, D.C., 1916, 499 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge-FS 2001] F. Sean Hodge, Raymond H. Colton, and Richard T. Kelley. “Vocal Intensity Characteristics in Normal and Elderly Speakers”, Journal of Voice, Volume 15, Issue 4, December 2001, pages 503–511, doi:10.1016/S0892-1997(01)00050-9. Publication 11792026 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments (2)

Abstract: The relationship of lung pressure, fundamental frequency, peak airflow, open quotient, and maximal flow declination rate to vocal intensity for a normal speaking, young male control group and an elderly male group was investigated. The control group consisted of 17 healthy male subjects with a mean age of 30 years and the elderly group consisted of 11 healthy male subjects with a mean age of 77 years. Data were collected at three levels of vocal intensity: soft, comfortable, and loud, corresponding to 25%, 50%, and 75% of dynamic range, respectively. Phonational threshold pressure and lung pressure were obtained using the intraoral technique. The oral airflow waveform was inverse filtered to provide an approximation to the glottal airflow waveform from which measures of fundamental frequency, peak airflow, open quotient, and maximal flow declination rate were determined. Excess lung pressure was calculated as lung pressure minus estimated phonational threshold pressure. The results show for both groups an increase in sound pressure level across the conditions, with corresponding increases in lung pressure, excess lung pressure, fundamental frequency, peak airflow, and maximal flow declination rate. Open quotient decreased with increasing vocal intensity. Lung pressure, sound pressure level, and peak airflow were all found to be significantly greater for the control group than for the elderly group at each condition. Open quotient was found to be significantly lower in the control group than in the elderly group at each condition. No significant difference was observed for excess lung pressure, phonational threshold pressure, fundamental frequency, or maximal flow declination rate between the two groups. These results show that a difference in vocal intensity does exist between young and elderly voices and that this difference is the result of differences in lung pressure, peak airflow, and open quotient.

[Hodgson 2002] Dorothy L. Hodgson. “Comparative Perspectives on the Indigenous Rights Movement in Africa and the Americas”, American Anthropologist, Volume 104, Number 4, December 2002, pages 1037–1049. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Native American Flute - Honoring the Tradition, Flutopedia Revision History

Abstract: Using ethnographic case studies, these "In Focus" articles explore the indigenous rights movements in two regions, Africa and the Americas, where the histories, agendas, and dynamics of the movements are at once similar and different. They consider a range of relevant questions about the politics of representation, recognition, resources, and rights as these movements engage shifting political and economic landscapes; transnational discourses, alliances, and organizations; and the complicated cultural politics of inclusion and exclusion invoked by the term indigenous. As such, they offer a critical, comparative perspective on the issues of culture, power, representation, and difference inherent in the complicated alliances, articulations, and tensions that have produced and transformed the transnational indigenous rights movement. This introduction provides a brief history of the movement, highlights some major themes in previous anthropological work, reviews the insights of the section articles, and explores some of the ways in which anthropologists have engaged with the movement.

[Hoffman-WJ 1891] Walter James Hoffman. “The Mide'wiwin or “Grand Medicine Society” of the Ojibwa”, Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1885-'86, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1891, pages 143–300, retrieved March 15, 2010. Reissued in [Hoffman-WJ 2006]. Publication annualreportofbu718851886smit on Archive.org (open access). Contains 2 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hoffman-WJ 1896] Walter James Hoffman. “The Menomini Indians”, Fourteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1892-93, Part 1, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1896, pages 3–328, retrieved March 15, 2010. J. W. Powell, Director. Publication annualreportofbu14118921893smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hoffman-WJ 2006] Walter James Hoffman. The Mide'wiwin or “Grand Medicine Society” of the Ojibwa, published by Project Gutenberg, September 25, 2006, retrieved Febuary 7, 2010. Reissue of [Hoffman-WJ 1891]. See the Project Gutenberg Ebook #19368 web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hofman 1983] Michel A. Hofman. “Energy Metabolism, Brain Size and Longevity in Mammals”, The Quarterly Review of Biology, Volume 58, Number 4, published by the, University of Chicago Press, December 1983, pages 495–512. Publication 2829325 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hofmann 1946] Charles Hofmann, Walking-in-Daylight, Sam Blowsnake. Songs of the Winnebago People, Disc Company of America, 1946, 78 rpm audio disc. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

[Hofmann 1947] Charles Hofmann. “American Indian Music in Wisconsin, Summer 1946”, The Journal of American Folklore, Volume 60, Number 237, published by the American Folklore Society, July–September 1947, pages 289–293. Publication 536382 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Fourteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (7), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (7)

Introduction: More than two hundred American Indians from five different tribes assembled in Wisconsin Dells during the summer of 1946 and the writer had the opportunity to meet old and new friends among the Winnebago, Sioux, Chippewa, Zuni and Acoma peoples. Except for the permanent residents of the state (the large group of Winnebago), the other families have been making an annual summer trip to this locality for eighteen years. Since 1928 a ceremonial has been held at the Upper Dells of the Wisconsin River, and visitors have had the opportunity to see old ceremonial dances and to hear a variety of traditional songs by the groups from the Woodlands, the Plains, and from the Southwest. In the summer of 1946 approximately 250,000 persons attended the Stand Rock Indian Ceremonial in Wisconsin.

The writer worked with these five groups for eight weeks, and after five weeks of preparation and of collecting background material, set up a recording apparatus, and collected ninety songs from fourteen singers within three days.

[Hofmann 1947a] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). American Indian Songs and Dances, Ethnic Series of World Folkways, DISC Company of America, No. 161, 21 songs, 1947, set of 78 rpm 10" audio discs (six). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

Introduction: The recordings included in this disc were collected in Wisconsin at the Upper Dells of the Wisconsin River where morc than 200 American Indians from five different tribes assembled for the annual Stand Rock Indian Ceremonial. The neighboring Winnebago people were joined by the Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni and Acoma - distinct groups of Ihe Woodlands, the Plains and the Southwest.

[Hofmann 1952] Charles Hofmann. War Whoops and Medicine Songs, published by Boston Music Co., Boston, 1952, ASIN B000GJJGI2, hardcover. [Hofmann 1964] is the related audio recording. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[Hofmann 1964] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). War Whoops and Medicine Songs — The Music of the American Indians Including Songs of the Winnebago, Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni & Acoma, Ethnic Folkways Library, Folkways Records, FE-4381, 32 tracks, 1964, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4381. [Hofmann 1952] is a related book. Reissued in [Hofmann 2001]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Fifteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (7), Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (7)

Introduction: The recordings included in this disc were collected in Wisconsin at the Upper Dells of the Wisconsin River where morc than 200 American Indians from five different tribes assembled for the annual Stand Rock Indian Ceremonial. The neighboring Winnebago people were joined by the Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni and Acoma - distinct groups of Ihe Woodlands, the Plains and the Southwest.

[Hofmann 1967] Charles Hofmann; Nicholas Amorosi (illustrations). American Indians Sing — The Thought, Religion and Culture of Indian Nations Across the Land as Revealed through Their Music, Dances, Song-poetry and Ceremonies, Third Impression Edition, published by John Day Co., New York, 1967, 96 pages, ASIN B000QAZ3JM, hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

Description by Robert J. Damm: American Indians Sing (Hofmann, 1967) was written specifically for younger readers. The focus was on why Indians sing and what songs mean to them; Hoffman explained music in relation to Indian life and culture. Descriptions of instruments, dances, and ceremonies also were given. This is not a performance-oriented source; melodies were presented without lyrics, and accompanying English text does not correspond rhythmically with the text. A recording of songs from seven different tribes was included to demonstrate a variety of singing styles and musical instruments.

[Hofmann 1968] Charles Hofmann. Frances Densmore and American Indian Music: A Memorial Volume, published by the Museum of the American Indian / Hye Foundation, New York, 1968, 158 pages. Publication francesdensmorea00hofm on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Ten citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (5), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (5)

[Hofmann 1972] Charles Hofmann (text); Edward G. Cornwell, Jr. (drawings). Musical Instruments of the Indians of the Americas, published by the Rochester Museum and Science Center, Rochester, New York, 1972, 27 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hofmann 2001] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). War Whoops and Medicine Songs: The Music of the American Indians Including Songs of the Winnebago, Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni & Acoma, Smithsonian / Folkways, F-4381, 32 tracks, 2001, audio CD. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4381. [Hofmann 1952] is a related book. Reissue of [Hofmann 1964]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hofsinde 1967] Robert Hofsinde. Indian Music Makers, published by William Morrow and Company, New York, 1967. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Holland A] Mark Holland; Julia Gatliff (transcriptions). Songs for All Seasons — Selected Works by Mark Holland / Autumn's Child (song book), 76 pages. Nakai tablature notation, six-hole finger diagrams, CD included. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Holm 2005] Wil Holm and Brent Haines. Duets from Around the World for Native American Flute (song book), published by Woodsounds Flutes, 2005, 85 pages, spiral binding. Nakai tablature notation, six-hole finger diagrams, CD included. Contains 14 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Holmberg 1988] E. B. Holmberg, R. E. Hillman, and J. S. Perkell. “Glottal airflow and transglottal air pressure measurements for male and female speakers in soft, normal, and loud voice”, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 84, Number 2, August 1988, pages 511–529. Erratum in Volume 85, Number 4 of the same journal. Publication 3170944 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Measurements on the inverse filtered airflow waveform (the "glottal waveform") and of estimated average transglottal pressure and glottal airflow were made from noninvasive recordings of productions of syllable sequences in soft, normal, and loud voice for 25 male and 20 female speakers. Statistical analyses showed that with change from normal to loud voice, both males and females produced loud voice with increased pressure, accompanied by increased ac flow and increased maximum airflow declination rate. With change from normal voice, soft voice was produced with decreased pressure, ac flow and maximum airflow declination rate, and increased dc and average flow. Within the loudness conditions, there was no significant male-female difference in air pressure. Several glottal waveform parameters separated males and females in normal and loud voice. The data indicate higher ac flow and higher maximum airflow declination rate for males. In soft voice, the male and female glottal waveforms were more alike, and there was no significant difference in maximum airflow declination rate. The dc flow did not differ significantly between males and females. Possible relevance to biomechanical differences and differences in voice source characteristics between males and females and across loudness conditions is discussed.

[Holmes 1884] William H. Holmes. “Illustrated Catalogue of a Portion of the Collections Made by the Bureau of Ethnology During the Field Season of 1881”, Third Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1881-'82, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1884, pages 427–510, retrieved March 15, 2010. J. W. Powell, Director. Publication annualreportofbu318811882smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Holmes 2012] Jonathan Holmes. Ponca Hethuska Society, July 31, 2012. Ponca Hethuska Society Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Holterman 1996] Jack Holterman. A Blackfoot Language Study — A Special Study of the Blackfoot Language on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, 1932-1996, First Edition, published by the Piegan Institute, Browning, Montana, 1996, retrieved October 28, 2012. See the Saokio Heritage web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Holtz 2003] Carla Holtz. “The INAFA Archives: An Armchair Tour”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2003, Volume 3, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2003, pages 18–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Honing 2002] Henkjan Honing. “Structure and Interpretation of Rhythm and Timing”, Tijdschrift Voor Muziektheorie, Volume 7, Number 3, 2002, pages 227–232. Structure and Interpretation of Rhythm and Timing Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Meter for Native American Flutes

Abstract: Rhythm, as it is performed and perceived, is only sparingly addressed in music theory. Existing theories of rhythmic structure are often restricted to music as it is notated in a score, and as a result are bound to refrain from making statements about music as it is perceived and appreciated by listeners. This paper outlines a cognitive approach to the study of rhythm and timing that allows for making scientific observations and statements about ‘sounding’ music, music as it is performed and listened to. This approach was developed over the last few years in the context of the Music, Mind, Machine project at the Nijmegen Institute for Cognition of Information.

In addition, the notion of rhythm space (the set of all possible performed rhythms) is elaborated into a systematic method for the investigation of the relation between rhythmic structure, expressive timing and tempo. As such the paper presents a research program that aims to develop a theory of music incorporating both the structural and perceptual aspects of musical time.

[Hood 1846] George Hood. A History of the Music of New England, published by Wilkins, Carter & Co., 1846, 252 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hood-BC 1993] Bryan C. Hood. “The Maritime Archaic Indians of Labrador: Investigating Prehistoric Social Organization”, Newfoundland Studies, Volume 9, Number 2, 1993, pages 163–184. ISSN 0823·1737. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hooton 1920] E. A. Hooton (1887–1954) and Charles C. Willoughby (1857–1943). “Indian Village Site and Cemetery Near Madisonville, Ohio”, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Volume 7, Number 1, 1920. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Hopkin 1996] Bart Hopkin. Musical Instrument Design: Practical Information for Instrument Makers, published by See Sharp Press, 181 pages, ISBN 1-884365-08-6 (978-1-884365-08-9). Catalog number CM-16. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This encyclopedic, extensively illustrated book provides the information necessary to explore the world of musical instrument design and construction. While newcomers will appreciate its practical, hands-on approach and friendly tone, those with an established interest in instrument making will find it equally valuable. No other single resource contains the theoretical and practical information found in this volume. Chapters on flute-making and wind instrument design are worth the price of the entire book.

[Hopkin 1999] Bart Hopkin. Air Columns and Toneholes — Principles for Wind Instrument Design, Revised edition, published by Tai Hei Shakuhachi, Willits, California, 1999, 42 pages, comb binding. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Native American Flute - Finger Hole Placement, CrossTune - Tool for Tuning a Native American flute for a Different Environment

[Hornbostel 1907] Erich Moritz von Hornbostel (1877–1935). “Phonographierte tunesische Melodien «Recorded Tunisian Melodies»”, Sammelbände der internationalen Musikgesellschaft, Volume 8, in German, 1906–1907, pages 1–43. Publication SammelbandeDerInternationalenMusikgesellschaft081906-07 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (5)

[Hornbostel 1914] Erich Moritz von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs (1881–1959). “Systematik der Musikinstrumente: Ein Versuch «Classification of Musical Instruments: Version One»”, Zeitschrift für Ethnologie - Organ der Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschiechte, Volume 46, published by Behrend & Co., Berlin, in German, 1914, pages 553–590. Publication zeitschriftfre46berluoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Classification of Flutes

[Hornbostel 1961] Erich Moritz von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs; Anthony Baines and Klaus P. Wachsmann (translation). “Classification of Musical Instruments — Translated from the Original German by Anthony Baines and Klaus P. Wachsmann”, The Galpin Society Journal, Volume 14, published by the Galpin Society, March 1961, pages 3–29. Publication 842168 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Classification of Flutes (2)

[Horne 2002] Nigel Horne. “The Written Notation of Medieval Music”, May 6, 2002, 7 pages. The Written Notation of Medieval Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Horne-CF 1917] Charles Francis Horne (1870–1942). The Sacred Books and Early Literature of the East;With an Historical Survey and Descriptions, published by Parke, Austin, and Lipscomb, Inc., New York and London, 1917, 464 pages. Publication sacredbooksearly01hornuoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Horowitz 2006] Wayne Horowitz. “A Late Babylonian Tablet with Concentric Circles from the University Museum (CBS 1766)”, Journal of The Ancient Near Eastern Society, Volume 30, 2006, pages 37–53. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Horvath 2010] Janet Horvath. Playing (Less) Hurt — An Injury Prevention Guide for Musicians, published by Hal Leonard, 2010, 256 pages, ISBN-13 978-1-4234-8846-0, ASIN 1423488466. See the Playing Less Hurt Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Making music at any level is a powerful gift. While musicians have endless resources for learning the basics of their instruments and the theory of music, few books have explored the other subtleties and complexities that musicians face in their quest to play with ease and skill. The demands of solitary practice, hectic rehearsal schedules, challenging repertoire, performance pressures, awkward postures, and other physical strains have left a trail of injured, hearing-impaired, and frustrated musicians who have had few resources to guide them. Playing Less Hurt addresses this need with specific tools to avoid and alleviate injury. Impressively researched, the book is invaluable not only to musicians, but also to the coaches and medical professionals who work with them. Everyone from dentists to orthopedists, audiologists to neurologists, massage therapists and trainers will benefit from Janet Horvath's coherent account of the physiology and psyche of a practicing musician. Writing with knowledge, sympathetic insight, humor, and aplomb, Horvath has created an essential resource for all musicians who want to play better and feel better.

[Hoshiyama-M 2008] M. Hoshiyama and A. Hoshiyama. “Heart Rate Variability Associated with Experienced Zen Meditation”, Computers in Cardiology, Volume 35, 2008, pages 569–572, doi:10.1109/CIC.2008.4749105. See the Computing in Cardiology web site. Heart Rate Variability Associated with Experienced Zen Meditation Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: To understand the control of hemodynamic events elicited by deep Zen meditation during Zazen, we studied heart rate in 5 experienced Zen meditators and 5 beginners. The study took place over 4 sets of Zen meditations in a quiet, Zen practice hall in Kamakura or Tokyo. Each set of Zazen lasted for 25 minutes which was preceded by specific respiratory exercise. The first sets were used for habituation, and the ECG data obtained from the following three sets were used for analysis. Power spectrum analysis showed distinctive change in frequency components. Low and high frequency components increased for experienced meditators. Most notably, detrended fluctuations analysis (DFA) of HRV were around 1/2 for experienced meditators and 0.78 for beginners. We attribute the decrease of DFA exponent in experienced meditators to the effective regulation of mind during meditation toward the edge of sleep, but not quite over it.

[Hoshiyama-M 2010] Masaki Hoshiyama and Asagi Hoshiyama. “Repeatability Value in Heart Rate Associated with Experienced Zen Meditation”, Proceedings of Computing in Cardiology, Belfast, United Kingdom, September 26–29, 2010, Computers in Cardiology, Volume 37, 2010, pages 709–712. ISSN 0276−6574. See the Computing in Cardiology web site. Repeatability Value in Heart Rate Associated with Experienced Zen Meditation Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: To understand the repeatability of hemodynamic events elicited by deep Zen meditation during Zazen, we studied heart rate in 5 experienced Zen meditators and beginners. The study took place over 8 sets of Zen meditations in a quiet, Zen practice hall. Each set of Zazen lasted at least for 25 minutes. The first sets were used for habituation, and the data obtained from the following seven sets were used for analysis. Power spectrum analysis showed distinctive change in frequency components. Very low frequency (VLF) components decreased for experienced meditators. Most notably, standard deviations from 7 sets of measurements within each subjects were significantly low for experienced meditators, showing increased repeatability. We attribute the decrease in VLF components to the less easily distracted meditation, and the increase in repeatability to the effective regulation of mind and body movement during experienced Zen meditation.

[Hough 1897] Walter Hough (1859–1935). “The Hopi in Relation to Their Plant Environment”, American Anthropologist, Volume 10, Number 2, February 1897, pages 33–44. Publication 658916 on JSTOR (subscription access). The Hopi in Relation to Their Plant Environment Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

[Hough 1905] Walter Hough. Field Notes, Museum - Gates Expedition, 1905, Manuscript 7117, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, 1905, 76 pages. Repository at the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Museum Support Center, Suitland, Maryland, local number NAA MS 7117. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

Summary: Notes, maps, sketches of artifacts and petroglyphs; catalog of over 800 specimens collected; list of boxes shipped July 23 - September 12, 1905. Notes from expedition, June - October 1905, along the San Francisco River on the Arizona - New Mexico border.

[Hough 1907] Walter Hough. Antiquities of the Upper Gila and Salt River Valleys in Arizona and New Mexico, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 35, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1907, 96 pages, retrieved March 18, 2010. Publications bulletin351907smit, antiquitiesuppe01houggoog, and antiquitiesuppe03houggoog on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

Introduction: The area in which are found the archeological remains treated in this bulletin forms part of southwestern New Mexico (western Socorro, Grant, and Luna counties) and southeastern Arizona (Apache, Navajo. Gila, Pinal, Graham, and Cochise counties). It is bounded on the northeast by the great ridge lying between the Gila-Salt and Little Colorado. rivers; on the west and northwest by the Tonto basin; on the south by the states of Sonora and Chihuahua, Mexico, and on the southeast by the San Agustin plains. Approximately it extends 170 miles east and west and 200 miles north and south. Much of this area is covered by the Black Mesa, Mount Graham, and Chiricahua forest reserves in Arizona and the Gila River forest reserve in New Mexico.

[Hough 1914] Walter Hough. Culture of the Ancient Pueblos of the Upper Gila River Region, New Mexico and Arizona — Second Museum-Gates Expedition, Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum, Bulletin 87, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1914, xiv + 138 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks (3)

[Hough 1918] Walter Hough. “The Hopi Indian Collection in the United States National Museum”, Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Volume 54, Number 2235, published by the Government Printing Office, Washington, 1918, pages 235–296. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hourmouziades 2002] G. H. Hourmouziades. Sound at Last, Entry #6 of Dispilio Excavations - The Diary of and Archaeologist, in Greek and English, August 8, 2002. Sound at Last Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Howard 1990] James Henri Howard and Victoria Lindsay Levine. Choctaw Music and Dance, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1990. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

Publisher's description: Since the removal of the greater part of the Choctaws to Oklahoma in the 1830s, Euro-American acculturation has become especially dominant among them, but among the isolated group of Choctaws that remained in Mississippi and a few individuals in Oklahoma, the old tribal dances and songs have been preserved. In Choctaw Music and Dance, James H. Howard and Victoria Lindsay Levine discuss all aspects of the Choctaw dances and songs performed today by dance troupes in Mississippi and Oklahoma. They describe in detail the social organization of the troupes, the construction and use of their musical instruments, their costumes, and the choreography of the dances themselves, which are illustrated with photographs. An overview of Choctaw dance music, with an analysis of musical elements, form, and design and musical transcriptions of thirty songs, is also provided.

[Howard 1998] Anne Kimble Howard. Song of the White Buffalo Woman (song book), published by RabbitDog Publishing, Louisville, Kentucky, 1998, comb binding. Nakai tablature notation, no finger diagrams. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Howard 2002] Anne Kimble Howard. Song of the White Buffalo Woman, Revised Edition (song book), published by RabbitDog Publishing, Louisville, Kentucky, 2002, 37 pages, comb binding. Nakai tablature notation, no finger diagrams. Contains 59 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Howard 2002a] Ann Kimble Howard. Song of the Spirit Women — Lullabies and traditional songs (song book). Nakai tablature notation, six-hole finger diagrams. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Howard-JH 1969] James H. Howard. Reviewed Work: War Dance Songs of the Ponca by Tony Isaacs, Ethnomusicology, Volume 13, Number 1, January 1969, pages 202–204, doi:10.2307/849847. Publication 849847 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Howard-JH 1981] James H. Howard. Shawnee!: The Ceremonialism of the Native Indian Tribe and its Cultural Background, published by the Ohio University Press, Athens, Ohio, 1981, 160 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Howard-W 1999] Wayne Howard. “Natyasastra: Ancient Scales of Indian Music, with Sanjivanam Commentary of Acarya Brhaspati”, Journal of the American Oriental Society, April 1999. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hoyer 1996] Mark T. Hoyer. “Gary Snyder and Wovoka”, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Volume 2, Number 2, 1996, pages 135–138, doi:10.1093/isle/2.2.135. response to [Hunt-A 1993]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hrdlicka 1905] Aleš Hrdlička. “Notes on the San Carlos Apache”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 7, Number 3, July–September 1905, pages 480–495. Publication 659042 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huang-L 2012] Lao Huang; Liz Tung (translation). On the Character 乐 «On the Character Yuè», September 21, 2012. On the Character 乐 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: Whether you prefer heavy metal dirges or delicate sonatas, music—as Confucius once said—is something that “produces a kind of pleasure which human nature cannot do without” (夫乐者,乐也,人情之所不能免也。Fú yuè zhě, yuè yě, rénqíng zhī suǒ bùnéng miǎn yě. ). This universal language, which in Chinese goes by the name 音乐 (yīnyuè ), first found written expression more than 3,000 years ago, when the earliest versions of the character 乐 appeared in oracle bone script, drawn to represent an instrument with strings on top and a wooden base on the bottom.

[Huck 2010] John S. Huck. “Descriptive Metadata for Audio-Oriented Digital Collections”, 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hudson 1977] Travis Hudson, Thomas Blackburn, Rosario Curletti, and Janice Timbrook. The Eye of the Flute: Chumash Traditional History and Ritual as Told by Fernando Kibrado (Kitsepawit) to John P. Harrington, published by the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, California, 1977. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huenemann 1978] Lynn Huenemann. Songs and Dances of Native America: A Resource text for Teachers and Students, published by Education House, Tsaile, Arizona, 1978, softcover book with audio cassette. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (2)

Description by Robert J. Damm: Huenemann's Songs and Dances of Native America: A Resource text for Teachers and Students (1978, with recordings) provides musical, textual, and cultural information on songs and dances for use in schools. It included 90 musical transcriptions and translations of Navajo, Plains, Great Lakes and other tribes. Huenemann devoted a chapter to resources which included bibliographies listing American Indian music by regions.

[Huenemann 1980] Lynn Huenemann. “Flute Songs of the Kiowa and Comanche—Indian House - IH-2512”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 24, Number 2, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, May 1980, pages 339–341. Publication 851142 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Description from [Keeling 1997]: Huenemann considers these to be excellent recording by two of the best contemporary flute players. Also discusses the increasing popularity of the instrument, the styles of both players, and the important contribution of a non-Indian player and flute-maker, Dr. Richard W. Payne.

[Hughes 2007] Bill Hughes. Making the Native American Style Flutes with Bill Hughes Ph.D., In Two Volumes, published by ACR International, 2007, video DVD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Perfect for those who do not own a large lathe or other machine tools. Bill Hughes provides step-by-step instructions that are both comprehensive and easy to follow. The techniques you will learn are priceless to the beginner and sure to inspire seasoned flute makers as well.

There is a complete list of the tools you will need, as well as many suggestions on ways to use tools you may already have. Using basic hand tools, such as a mallet, chisel, and scrapers, Bill guides you from the first rough steps of cutting and shaping, through sanding, and adding the final touches to create a beautiful, functional work of art.

[Hughes 2014] Bill Hughes. Bore Routing Safety Jig, 2014, retrieved August 25, 2014. Bore Routing Safety Jig Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

[Huitt 2009] W. Huitt. Humanism and Open Education, published by Educational Psychology Interactive, 2009, retrieved August 4, 2013. Humanism and Open Education Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huitt 2012] W. Huitt. A Systems Approach to the Study of Human Behavior, published by Educational Psychology Interactive, 2012, retrieved August 4, 2013. A Systems Approach to the Study of Human Behavior Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hull 1999] Arthur Hull. Drum Circle Spirit: Facilitating Human Potential through Rhythm, Performance in World Music Series, Book 12, published by White Cliffs Media, 1999, 224 pages, ISBN 0-941677-84-2 (978-0-941677-84-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Humphrey 1911] William Brewster Humphrey. North American Indian Folklore Music, published by the American Indian League, New York, 1911. Reissued in [Humphrey 2006]. Publication northamericanind00hump on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Humphrey 2006] William Brewster Humphrey. North American Indian Folklore Music, published by Kessinger Publishing, LLC, May 26, 2006, 48 pages, ISBN 1-4286-1161-4 (978-1-4286-1161-0). Reissue of [Humphrey 1911]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Humphreys 2000] P. A. Humphreys and R. N. Gevirtz. “Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain: Components Analysis of Four Treatment Protocols”, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Volume 31, Number 1, 2000, pages 47–51. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hunt 1954] Walter Ben Hunt (1888–1970). The Golden Book of Indian Crafts and Lore, published by Simon and Schuster, 1954, 111 pages, ASIN B0006ATY4C Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutopedia Image Detail: Walter Ben Hunt's Plans, Plans for Making Native American Flutes

[Hunt 1973] Walter Ben Hunt. The Complete How-To Book of Indiancraft: 68 Projects for Authentic Indian Articles from Tepee to Tom-tom, published by Collier Books, New York, 1973, 192 pages, ISBN 0-02-011690-X (978-0-02-011690-5). first published in 1969 under the title "Ben Hunt's Big Indiancraft Book". Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Plans for Making Native American Flutes

[Hunt-A 1993] Anthony Hunt. “'The Hump-Backed Flute Player': The Structure of Emptiness in Gary Snyder's Mounts and Rivers Without End”, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 1993, pages 1–24, doi:10.1093/isle/1.2.1 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hunter 1824] John D. Hunter. “Memoirs of a Captivity Among the Indians of North America, from Childhood to the Age of Nineteen;With Anecdotes Descriptive of their Manners and Customs”, The Quarterly Review, Volume 31, published by John Murray, Albemarle Street, London, December 1824, pages 76–111. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Hurley 1968] William M. Hurley. “The Kickapoo Whistle System: A Speech Surrogate”, Plains Anthropologist, Volume 13, Number 41, published by the Plains Anthropological Society, August 1968, pages 242–247. Publication 25666798 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The Mexican and Oklahoma whistle and flute languages are presented as dual surrogates which have been maintained and utilized as communications systems for over 100 years.

[Hutchinson 1864] Enoch Hutchinson. Music of the Bible, published by Gould and Lincoln, Boston, 1864, 513 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Hutchinson-J 1874] Joshua Hutchinson (1811–1882). A Brief Narrative of the Hutchinson Family: Sixteen Sons and Daughters of the "Tribe of Jesse", published by Lee and Shepard, Boston, Massachusetts, 1876, 73 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hutchinson-JJ 1848] J. J. Hutchinson (music); Jesse Hutchinson Jr. (lyrics). Eight Dollars a Day, published by Oliver Ditson, Boston, Massachusetts, 1848, 5 pages. Library of Congress Digital ID sm1848 431770. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huxley 1946] Aldous Huxley. Silence, Liberty, and Peace — A Thoughtful Analysis of the Individual Today and his Future in the World, First Edition, published by Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1946, 86 pages, ASIN B0006DCLB2 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Readings and Quotations on Silence

[Huynh 1976] Huynh Huynh and Leonard S. Feldt. “Estimation of the Box Correction for Degrees of Freedom from Sample Data in the Randomized Block and Split-plot Designs”, Journal of Educational Statistics, Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 1976, pages 69–82. Publication 1164736 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: It has been suggested that when the variance assumptions of a repeated measures ANOVA are not met, the df of the mean square ratio should be adjusted by the sample estimate of the Box correction factor, ε. This procedure works well when ε is low, but the estimate is seriously biased when this is not the case. An alternate estimate is proposed which is shown by Monte Carlo methods to be less biased for moderately large ε.

[Hyslop 1975] Graham Hyslop. Musical Instruments of East Africa — 1 Kenya, published by Thomas Nelson and Sons, Trinidad, 1975, 64 pages, ISBN 0-17-511250-9 (978-0-17-511250-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Author's description: African musical instrument make a fascinating study. These Notes introduce students to some of the strings, wind and percussion instruments which make up such an important part of Kenya's rich musical heritage. These instruments deserve attention not only for their own undeniable musical quality, but also for what they reveal about the music of the areas in which they are found - for example, by the way in which they are tuned. The music played on them reveals an artistic integrity which will delight many and possibly surprise some.

 
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