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References - M

This page lists references with citation tags that begin with the letter M. For other references and a documentation on how these references are cited, see the main references page. You can also click on these direct links to the various pages:

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References - M

[Maas 1989] Martha Maas (born 1934) and Jane McIntosh Snyder. Stringed Instruments of Ancient Greece, published by Yale University Press, London, 1989, 288 pages, ISBN 0-300-03686-8 (978-0-300-03686-2). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[MacCauley 1887] Clay MacCauley (1843–1925). “The Seminole Indians of Florida”, Fifth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1883-'84, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1887, pages 469–531, retrieved March 15, 2010. Reissued in [MacCauley 2006] The Seminole Indians of Florida. Publication annualreportofbu518831884smit on Archive.org (open access). Contains 3 songs. The Seminole Indians of Florida Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[MacCauley 2006] Clay MacCauley. The Seminole Indians of Florida, published by Project Gutenberg, September 1, 2006, retrieved Febuary 7, 2010. Reissue of [MacCauley 1887] The Seminole Indians of Florida. See the Project Gutenberg Ebook #19155 web page. The Seminole Indians of Florida (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[MacDonald 2003] Raymond A. R. MacDonald, Laura A. Mitchell, Teresa Dillon, Michael G. Serpell, John B. Davies, and Euan A. Ashley. “An Empirical Investigation of the Anxiolytic and Pain Reducing Effects of Music”, Psychology of Music, Volume 31, Number 2, published by the Society for Music Education, 2003, pages 187–203. An Empirical Investigation of the Anxiolytic and Pain Reducing Effects of Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This article reports two empirical experiments investigating the anxiety and pain reducing effects of listening to music via personal stereo following surgical procedures involving general anaesthetic. Both experiments involved participants selecting music of their own choice. In Experiment 1, following minor surgery on the foot, 20 participants in an experimental group listened to music while 20 participants in a control group did not. Results indicate that the music group felt significantly less anxiety than the control group. No differences in pain measurements between the two groups were found. Experiment 2 involved a music listening group of 30 females and a no music control group of 28 females. Both groups underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Postoperative measures of pain, anxiety and patient-controlled analgesia were taken. No differences between the groups were obtained on these measurements. The results of both experiments are discussed with reference to subjective responses to musical stimuli.

[Macdonald-DB 1940] D. Bruce Macdonald. University of Toronto Report of the Board of Governors for the Year Ended 30th June 1939, Sessional Paper No. 12, 1940, published by T. E. Bowman, 1940, 334 pages. Publication uoftreportgov1939univ on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Maceda 1990] José Maceda. “In Search of a Source of Pentatonic Hemitonic and Anhemitonic Scales in Southeast Asia”, Acta Musicologica, Volume 62, Fasc. 2/3, May–December 1990, pages 192–223. Publication 932633 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: An oral theory of scale formation in flutes in Southeast Asia is in essence abstract. In aiming at dividing the bamboo tube into halves, an octave is produced. Subdivisions of one-half that tube into proportional segments with stops produce four-tone scales with a variety of intervals. The abstraction is the idea of proportions which has become complex in its transmission through centuries of cultural traditions distributed over a wide geographical area. This divisive principle of scale formation allows for a plurality of scale intervals contrary to a cycle-of-fifths system which produces a unity of scale intervals related to each other by the fifth degree. Hemitonic and anhemitonic scales are an outcome of this principle. In Mindanao they are employed in separate flutes with distinct repertoire and social uses, more clearly practiced in Palawan lutes.

This oral theory is very old, probably antedating the application of scales in ensembles made of bronze and other instruments. It shows that pentatonic systems in Asia may not entirely be based on the cycle-of-fifths theory of scale formation. Dual scales and half or narrow steps in the gamelan and in gagaku have elements in common with the divisive system while following other musical features in the cyclic system of scale formation.

[MacGregor 2000] Arthur MacGregor. “The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford”, 2000, 95 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Macgregor 2003] Sherry Lou Macgregor. Women in the Neo-Assyrian World: Visual and Textual Evidence from Palace and Temple, doctoral dissertation – University of California, Berkeley, Spring 2003, 296 pages. ProQuest Dissertation #3105304. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Machado 1983] Antonio Machado (1875–1939); Robert Bly (editor, translation). Times Alone: Selected Poems of Antonio Machado, published by the Wesleyan University Press, 1983, 173 pages, ISBN 0-8195-6081-2 (978-0-8195-6081-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Poetry for the Native American Flute, Poetry and Readings for Memorial Services

[Maclagan 2009] Susan J. Maclagan. A Dictionary for the Modern Flutist, published by Scarecrow Press, 2009, 272 pages, ISBN 0-8108-6728-1 (978-0-8108-6728-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[MacNeish 1958] Richard S. MacNeish. “Preliminary Archaeological Investigations in the Sierra de Tamaulipas, Mexico”, Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, New Series, Volume 48, Number 6, 1958, pages 1–210. Publication 1005840 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Madsen 1989] D. B. Madsen. Exploring the Fremont, published by the Utah Museum of Natural History, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 1989, 70 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Magne 2002] Martin P. R. Magne and Michael A. Klassen. “A Possible Fluteplayer Pictograph Site Near Exshaw, Alberta”, Canadian Journal of Archaeology, Volume 26, Number 1, published by the Canadian Archaeological Association, 2002, pages 1–24. Publication 41103398 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Thirty-five years ago Thelma Habgood described a faint pictograph at the Grotto Canyon site in southwestern Alberta as a possible "Kokopelli" image. Polarized light photography undertaken in 2001 has greatly enhanced the pictograph panel, clearly revealing a possible fluteplayer motif and anthropomorphs that resemble the southwestern Fremont style. Even though certain elements of the panel may have been created at different times, we conclude that the site may be related to Hopi traditions concerning northward travels of the Flute Clan, although other explanations certainly cannot be discounted.

[Mails 1998] Thomas E. Mails. The Pueblo Children of the Earth Mother, published by Marlowe & Company, 1998, 544 pages, ISBN 1-56924-669-6 (978-1-56924-669-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mainfort 2008] Robert C. Mainfort, Jr. Raiders of the Lost Arkansas, published by The University of Arkansas Press, December 2008, 229 pages, ISBN 1-55728-886-0 (978-1-55728-886-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Breckenridge Flute

From the publisher's description: Samuel C. Dellinger (1892–1973) made it his life’s work to ensure that future Arkansans would remember their state’s pre-historic past. He gathered nearly eight thousand prehistoric artifacts in order to keep them from going to out-of-state museums — including Harvard’s Peabody, the Field in Chicago, and the Smithsonian Institution — and private collectors. This collection of prehistoric Native American artifacts is now recognized as one of the finest in the country.

[Mair 1895] Gilbert Mair. “The Ancient Tribe Te Panenehu”, Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute, Volume 28, published by Royal Society of New Zealand, 1895, pages 36–40. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Pokarekare Ana - Sheet Music for Native American Flute (2)

Introduction: The following account of an ancient tribe called Te Panenehu, the descendants of a chief named Ngatorohaka, who came in the Nukutere canoe from Hawaiki, was given to me by an old man of the Whakatohea and Ngapotiki Tribes at the hearing of the Whitikau Block, Opotiki, 1880.

[Mair 2006] Victor H. Mair. “Prehistoric European and East Asian Flutes”, contained in [Anderl 2006], 2006, pages 209–216. See the Instphi.Org web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

Lead paragraph: The world's first flutes - which are also the world's first known musical instruments fashioned and played by man - were created in Europe, and were associated with a quantum leap in the overall cognitive, aesthetic, and symbolic abilities of modern human beings during the Upper Paleolithic. The cave art and plastic art from this period and region are rightly celebrated as constituting a remarkable advance in human civilization, and it is possible that modern linguistic capability arose at around the same time, perhaps for similar reasons (the expansion and increased neural complexity of the human brain), although the hominid predecessors of Homo sapiens sapiens admittedly also possessed slowly increasing capacity to represent, express, and communicate.

[Malea 1997] E. Malea, P. Papageorgiou, G. Hourmouziadis, and G. Panagiaris. “Bone Flute from the Prehistoric Lake Settlement from Dispilio Kastoria: Technology and Conservation Problems”, Proceedings of the International Conference: Ancient Greek Technology, Thessalonica, Greece, September 4–7, 1997, in Greek, September 1997, pages 525–533. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Malick 2007] Deonne Malick, Jerry Moon, and John Canady. “Stress Velopharyngeal Incompetence: Prevalence, Treatment, and Management Practices”, Cleft Palate–Craniofacial Journal, Volume 44, Number 4, July 2007, pages 424–433, doi:10.1597/06-176.1 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

[Mallery 1881] Garrick Mallery. Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes, 1881, pages 263–552. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Malotki 2000] Ekkehart Malotki. Kokopelli: The Making of an Icon, published by the University of Nebraska Press, 2000, 177 pages, ISBN 0-8032-3213-6 (978-0-8032-3213-6), hardcover. Reissued in softcover [Malotki 2004]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Legends and Myths of the Native American Flute

Description by Julia Glynn of the American Library Association: Kokopelli is one of the favorite images of North American folkloric ideology. The likeness of a flute player with a hump, aged over 1,000 years through the oral and artistic traditions of the Hopi, can be found all over the southwest. Malotki, a professor of languages, analyzes the mystical fascination people have for the Panesque player of the flute. Kokopelli has been used in forms varying from wall decorations to characters in popular literature. Malotki believes that there is a connection between Kokopelli and two of the Hopi gods and uses Hopi text and folktales to share with the reader the many stories surrounding Kokopelli and to reveal what he sees. Throughout this book, numerous samples of the flute player are displayed to show the reader the multiple types of characters that have existed in this form. Anyone interested in the Hopi, or mythological characters, will enjoy this thoroughly intriguing investigation into a Native American legend.

[Malotki 2004] Ekkehart Malotki. Kokopelli: The Making of an Icon, published by the University of Nebraska Press, 2004, 177 pages, ISBN 0-8032-8295-8 (978-0-8032-8295-7), softcover. Reissue of the hardcover [Malotki 2000]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mandel 2003] Dorothy Marie Mandel. “Psychophysiological Resilience: A Theoretical Construct Based on Threat Perception and Early Programming of Restorative and Arousal Based Adaptive Mechanisms”, Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health, Volume 17, Number 3, March 2003, pages 235–250. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Why can some people be exposed to toxins, stressors, or traumatic events and be significantly less affected than others? The author conducts a review of research, constructs a theoretical model psychophysiological resilience, and examines the impact of prenatal and early childhood events on the formation of neural regulatory circuits. Psychophysiological resilience involves psychological, physiological, emotional, and spiritual resilience. Research is cited to support the theory that events occurring during gestation and birth offer clues to sustained adaptive programming that supports species preservation. Research relating the impacts of adaptive vs. maladaptive neurodevelopmental programming on currently relevant issues including psychosocial violence, functional intelligence, and somatic disease processes is cited. Emerging research on the role of the heart and the use of guided imagery and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) biofeedback in rebuilding physiological and emotional adaptive processes of resilience is articulated.

[Mandelbaum 1961] Mayer Joel Mandelbaum. Multuple Division of the Octave and the Tonal Resources of 19-Tone Temperament, Doctoral Dissertation – Indiana University, June 1961, 461 pages. Multuple Division of the Octave and the Tonal Resources of 19-Tone Temperament Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[Manniche 1975] Lise Manniche. Ancient Egyptian Musical Instruments, published by Deutscher Kunstverlag, 1975, 111 pages, ISBN 3-422-00827-6 (978-3-422-00827-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manniche 1988] Lise Manniche. “The Erotic Oboe of Ancient Egypt”, contained in [Hickmann-E 1988], 1988, pages 189–198. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manning 2005] Aubrey Manning. The Sounds of Life, Eight Episodes, published by BBC Radio 4, Broadcast dates July–September 2005. Contains 8 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manning-SJ 1990] Steven J. Manning. “The Lobed-Circle Image in the Basketmaker Petroglyphs of Southeastern Utah”, Utah Rock Art, Volume 10, published by the Utah Rock Art Research Association, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1990, pages 149–208. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manning-SJ 1992] Steven James Manning. “The Lobed-Circle Image in the Basketmaker Petroglyphs of Southeastern Utah”, Utah Archaeology, Volume 5, Number 1, 1992, pages 1–38. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks (2)

Abstract: In the Anasazi Basketmaker area of southeastern Utah there exists a distinctive, enigmatic, petroglyphic image that has often been discussed, but not identified. The image consists of a round-to-oval shape from which there is a rounded-rectangular extension or lobe. The shape exists both in the rock art and in physical objects. A method for determining theoretical interpretation for rock art images is proposed and then applied to arrive at a meaning for the image. The image occurs in a variety of contexts that suggest the image is associated with fertility. It is proposed that the image is a representation of a uterus. Further, Southwestern architecture has an overall form nearly identical to the lobed-circle image. This suggests the existence of ideological ties between the shape of these structures and the uterine image. The analysis also suggests that many rock art panels are mythological in nature.

[Manuel 1995] Peter Manuel. “New Perspectives in American Ethnomusicology”, Revista Transcultural de Música / Transcultural Music Review, Number 1, in Spanish and English, June 1995, retrieved December 19, 2010. ISSN:1697-0101. New Perspectives in American Ethnomusicology Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manzano 2010] Örjan de Manzano, Töres Theorell, László Harmat, and Fredrik Ullén. “The Psychophysiology of Flow During Piano Playing”, Emotion, Volume 10, Number 3, June 2010, pages 301–311, doi:10.1037/a0018432. Publication 20515220 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). The Psychophysiology of Flow During Piano Playing Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Expert performance is commonly accompanied by a subjective state of optimal experience called flow. Previous research has shown positive correlations between flow and quality of performance and suggests that flow may function as a reward signal that promotes practice. Here, piano playing was used as a flow-inducing behavior in order to analyze the relationship between subjective flow reports and psychophysiological measures. Professional classical pianists were asked to play a musical piece and then rate state flow. The performance was repeated five times in order to induce a variation in flow, keeping other factors constant, while recording the arterial pulse pressure waveform, respiration, head movements, and activity from the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major facial muscles. A significant relation was found between flow and heart period, blood pressure, heart rate variability, activity of the zygomaticus major muscle, and respiratory depth. These findings are discussed in relation to current models of emotion, attention, and expertise, and flow is proposed to be a state of effortless attention, which arises through an interaction between positive affect and high attention.

[Maor 2002] Eli Maor. Trigonometric Delights, published by Princeton University Press, 2002, 256 pages, ISBN-13 978-0-691-09541-7 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marcetteau 2008] Myriam Marcetteau. “A Queen's Orchestra at the Court of Mari: New Perspectives on the Archaic Instrumentarium in the Third Millennium”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2008), The British Museum, London, December 4–6, 2008, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2008, pages 67–75. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marco 1996] Guy A. Marco. Checklist of Writings on American Music, 1640–1992, Volumes 1–2, published by The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1996, 248 pages, ISBN 0-8108-3133-3 (978-0-8108-3133-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marcus 1993] Scott Marcus. “The Interface between Theory and Practice: Intonation in Arab Music”, Asian Music, Volume 24, Number 2, published by the University of Texas Press, Spring–Summer 1993, pages 39–58. Publication 834466 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[Marcus-J 2009] Joyce Marcus and Patrick Ryan Williams (editors). “Andean Civilization, a Tribute to Michael E. Moseley”, published by the UCLA Contsen Institute of Archaeology Press, in Spanish, 2009, pages 99–120. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marczak 2000] Eric P. Marczak. “Bone Flutes and Whistles of New York”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2000, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2000. See the INAFA web site. Bone Flutes and Whistles of New York Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Flutes and whistles from the Lamoka Lake and the Frontenac Island cultures are observed, measured, reproduced, and played upon.

[Marett 1991] Allan Marett. Musica Asiatica, Volume 6, 1991. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Perfect Intervals

[Marino 1986] Cesare Marino. “A Preview of the Beltrami Collection with a Note on North American Ethnographic Material in Italian Museums”, Council for Museum Anthropology Newsletter, Volume 10, Issue 2, April 1986, pages 2–14, doi:10.1525/mua.1986.10.2.2 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Beltrami Flutes - The Earliest Known Wooden Native American Flute

[Marino 1991] Cesare Marino; Robert I. Holden (introduction); Paula Richardson Fleming (photograph compliation); Duane K. Hale (bibliography). The Indian Nations: The First Americans - A Historical Perspective, published by the Americans All program of the People of America Foundation, 1991, viii + 34 pages, ISBN 1-56192-015-0. Library of Congress call number 91-091028, No. 1. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mark 1989] Joan T. Mark. A Stranger in Her Native Land: Alice Fletcher and the American Indians, published by the University of Nebraska Press, 1989, 428 pages, ISBN 0-8032-8156-0 (978-0-8032-8156-1). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Markl 1962] Jaroslav Markl. Antologie Autentických Forem Československého Hudebního Folklóru «An Anthology of Authentic Forms of Czechoslovak Folk Music», Prague, Czech Republic, 1962, 16 7-inch vinyl discs and brochure. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Europe (3)

[Marks 1974] Meyer Benjamin Marks. “Musical Wind Instruments in Rehabilitation of Asthmatic Children”, The 1974 Bela Schick Memorial Lecture, Annals of Allergy, Volume 33, Number 6, published by the American College of Allergists, December 1974, pages 313–319. Publication 4613211 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments (2)

[Marquis 2007] Thomas Bailey Marquis (photographs); Margot Liberty (editor); John Woodenlegs (contributor). A Northern Cheyenne Album, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, 286 pages, ISBN 0-8061-3893-9 (978-0-8061-3893-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Warble

[Marrocco 1964] W. Thomas Marrocco (born 1909) and Harold Gleason (born 1892). Music in America: An Anthology from the Landing of the Pilgrims to the Close of the Civil War, 1620-1865, published by W. W. Norton & Co., New York, 1964, 371 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marshall 1918] John Hubert Marshall (1876–1958). A Guide to Sanchi, published by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta, India, 1918, 154 pages. Reissued in [Marshall 1936] and [Marshall 1955]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Marshall 1936] John Hubert Marshall. A Guide to Sanchi, Second Edition, published by New Society Publications, 1936, 168 pages. Reissue of [Marshall 1918]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marshall 1955] John Hubert Marshall. A Guide to Sanchi, Third Edition, published by the Manager of Publications, Delhi, India, 1955, 168 pages. Reissue of [Marshall 1918]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Marstine 2012] Janet C. Marstine. Routledge Companion to Museum Ethics, published by Routledge, 2012, 512 pages, ISBN 1-136-71526-6 (978-1-136-71526-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Routledge Companion to Museum Ethics is a theoretically informed reconceptualization of museum ethics discourse as a dynamic social practice central to the project of creating change in the museum. Through twenty-seven chapters by an international and interdisciplinary group of academics and practitioners it explores contemporary museum ethics as an opportunity for growth, rather than a burden of compliance. The volume represents diverse strands in museum activity from exhibitions to marketing, as ethics is embedded in all areas of the museum sector. What the contributions share is an understanding of the contingent nature of museum ethics in the twenty-first century—its relations with complex economic, social, political and technological forces and its fluid ever-shifting sensibility.

[Marti 1968] Samuel Marti. Instrumentos Musicales Precortesianos «Pre-Cortez Musical Instruments», Second Edition, published by the Instituto Nacional de Anthropología Historia, Mexico, in Spanish, 1968, 378 pages, ASIN B000KKVMIY. first edition published in 1955. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: The Development of Flutes in the Americas (3)

[Martin 1952] Paul S. Martin (1899–1974), John B. Rinaldo, Elaine Bluhm, Hugh C. Cutler, and Roger Grange, Jr. Mogollon Cultural Continuity and Change — The Stratigraphic Analysis of Tularosa and Cordova Caves, Fieldiana: Anthropology, A continuation of the Anthropological Series of Field Museum of Natural History, Volume 40, published by the Chicago Natural History Museum, Chicago, U. S. A., November 17, 1952, 528 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (3)

[Martin 1954] Paul S. Martin, John B. Rinaldo, and Elaine Bluhm. Caves of the Reserve Area, Fieldiana: Anthropology, A continuation of the Anthropological Series of Field Museum of Natural History, Volume 42, published by the Chicago Natural History Museum, Chicago, U. S. A., June 11, 1954, 227 pages. Publication 29782335 on JSTOR (subscription access). Publication cavesofreservear42mart on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From the preface: During the summer of 1952, we continued our archaeological researches of the Mogollon culture of west-central New Mexico. We excavated a large rectangular kiva in an open site and four caves, two of which contain clifF-houses. This work was done under permits issued to Chicago Natural History Museum by the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture.

[Martin-JB 2001] Jack B. Martin. “Southeastern Languages”, published by Jack B. Martin, online, July 24, 2001, 161 pages, retrieved April 12, 2010. See the Jack B. Martin's web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Martin-KLH 1976] Katherine Lee Hall Martin. Bone Flutes and Whistles from Archaeological Sites in Eastern North America, Masters dissertation – University of Tennessee, Knoxville, December 1976, 231 pages. Bone Flutes and Whistles from Archaeological Sites in Eastern North America Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to systematically classify perforated bone tubes known as flutes or whistles which had been recovered from archaeological sites in eastern North America. A sample was established from specimens described in the literature and additional specimens examined by the author. Sizeable collections in the Rochester Museum and Science Center in Rochester, New York, and the Ohio State Museum in Columbus, Ohio, were measured and photographed by the author. Specimens were also viewed at the McClung Museum in Knoxville, Tennessee.

A descriptive typology was constructed and spatial-temporal and functional correlations were tested against it. Spatial-temporal factors were seen to correlate most highly with factors of morphological construction as reflected in the typology. Functional factors correlated less directly with typological categories. Functional attributes were reviewed under the formal categories of functional performance, functional context and functional use. Under the third category, evidence for use of perforated bone tubes as game calls was found to support such a function in addition to the traditionally ascribed ceremonial function for these artifacts. No spatial-temporal correlations with functional factors could be discerned.

The primary value of this study was in the typological description of a class of artifacts for the first time. Further research using a larger sample was recommended.

[Masao 1976] Fidelis Taliwawa Masao. The Later Stone Age and the Rock Paintings of Central Tanzania, Doctoral dissertation – Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November 1976, 511 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Maslowski 1995] Robert F. Maslowski, Charles M. Niquette and Derek M. Wingfield. “The Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia Radiocarbon Database”, West Virginia Archaeologist, Volume 47, Number 1–2, 1995. The Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia Radiocarbon Database Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: A total of 1919 radiocarbon dates for archeological sites and objects in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia has been compiled by the Council For West Virginia Archaeology. These data represent most radiocarbon dates available for the region up to August 1996. The database is presented in a tabular format in ascending order of radiocarbon age. The database includes site numbers, site names, components, time periods, lab numbers, radiocarbon age, sigma, calibrated age and references.

[Mason 1944] Bernard S. Mason. Dances and Stories of the American Indian, New York, 1944. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Masson 1999] Vadim Mikhaĭlovich Masson; Ahmad Hasan Dani and Vadim Mikhaĭlovich Masson (editors). History of Civilizations of Central Asia, Volume 1, published by Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, 1999, 535 pages, ISBN 81-208-1407-X (978-81-208-1407-3). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Masters 2008] Linda S. Masters and Sabrina Tuttle. “The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation and Extension Programs”, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Publication AZ1461, October 2006, 6 pages. The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation and Extension Programs Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Tribal Identification (2)

Abstract: The following information is provided for use by potential researchers and others who are interested in the Colorado River Indian Tribes Reservation. Historical information and current data are combined to create a picture of the geographical, political, social and cultural aspects of this unique low-desert Reservation.

[Mather 2003] Richard B. Mather, Yue Shen, Tiao Xie, and Rong Wang (born 1913). The Age of Eternal Brilliance: Three Lyric Poets of the Yung-ming Era (483-493), Volume 1, published by Koninklÿke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands, 2003, 367 pages, ISBN 90-04-12059-9 (set). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

[Mathews 1893] W. S. B. Mathews. “Indian Music and it Investigators”, Music, Volume 4, 1893, pages 452–456. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mathiesen 1984] Thomas J. Mathiesen. “Harmonia and Ethos in Ancient Greek Music”, The Journal of Musicology, Volume 3, Number 3, published by the University of California Press, Summer 1984, pages 264–279. Publication 763816 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mathieu 1991] W. A. Mathieu. The Listening Book, published by Shambhala, Boston and London, 1991, 179 pages, ISBN 0-87773-610-3, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mathieu 1994] W. A. Mathieu. The Musical Life, published by Shambhala, Boston and London, 1994, 235 pages, ISBN 0-87773-670-7, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mathieu 1997] W. A. Mathieu. Harmonic Experience: Tonal Harmony from Its Natural Origins to Its Modern Expression, published by Inner Traditions, Rochester, Vermont, 1997, 563 pages, ISBN 0-89281-560-4 (978-0-89281-560-9), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Intervals

[Mathieu 2008] W. A. Mathieu. The Listening Book and The Musical Life, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-082, 2 CD set, 49 tracks, November 11, 2008, total time 2:33:00, UPC 8-84501-04992-4, audio CD. See the Listening Book and the Musical Life web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matsunobu 2009] Koji Matsunobu. Artful Encounters with Nature: Ecological and Spiritual Dimensions of Music Learning, Doctoral dissertation – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009, 359 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: Indigenous knowledge is preserved, practiced, and passed down in a variety of ways in contemporary societies including supposedly highly modernized places such as Japan. One example from the pre-modern musical realm is the shakuhachi, a type of bamboo flute that has recently experienced a new wave of attention both inside and outside Japan. This dissertation offers an in-depth analysis of how contemporary music practitioners/educators interpret, appropriate, and practice the tradition of spiritual music both inside and outside Japan, focusing on how they reframe and embody what I identify as indigenous cultural values in today‘s educational settings.

[Matthews 1877] Washington Matthews (1843–1905). Ethnography and Philology of the Hidatsa Indians, Miscellaneous Publications Number 7, published by the Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1877, 239 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Tribal Identification

[Matthews 1889] Washington Matthews. “Navaho Gambling Songs”, The American Anthropoligist, Volume 2, published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., 1889, pages 1–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matthews 1894] Washington Matthews. “Songs of Sequence of the Navajos”, The Journal of American Folk-lore, Volume 7, Number 26, July–September 1894, pages 185–194. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matthews 1897] Washington Matthews. Navaho Legends — with Introduction, Notes, Illustrations, Texts, Interlinear Translations, and Melodies, The American Folk-lore Society series, published by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, London and Leipzig, 1897, 299 pages, hardcover. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Poetry for the Native American Flute, Readings and Quotations on Music

[Matthews 1907] Washington Matthews; Pliny Earle Goddard (editor) (1869–1928). “Navaho Myths, Prayers and Songs, With Texts and Translations”, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, Volume 5, Number 2, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, September 1907, pages 21–63, retrieved October 27, 2010. Publication navahomythspraye00mattrich on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matthews A] Andrea Matthews. Four Corners — Native Flute Tunes Inspired by the American Southwest (song book). Nakai tablature notation and sheet music, no finger diagrams. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matzner 2003] Shari A. Matzner. Heart Rate Variability During Meditation, ECE 510 Statistical Signal Processing, 2003, 4 pages. Heart Rate Variability During Meditation Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This paper describes a study of heart rate variability, specifically how the variability differs in a subject before and during meditation. The results clearly show that the heart rate sequence of all subjects exhibited increased mean value, increased variability, and increased power in the Low Frequency band. This can be interpreted as evidence of a change in the balance of the autonomic nervous system induced by meditation.

[Mauchahty-Ware 1978] Tom Mauchahty-Ware. Flute Songs Of The Kiowa and Comanche, Taos, New Mexico, Indian House, IH 2512, 13 tracks, 1978, audio LP. Recorded at Hog Creek, Oklahoma on June 1, 1978. Includes liner notes by Tom Mauchahty-Ware and Tony Isaacs. Reissued in [Mauchahty-Ware 1995]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

26 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (13), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (13)

[Mauchahty-Ware 1995] Tom Mauchahty-Ware. Flute Songs Of The Kiowa and Comanche, Taos, New Mexico, Indian House, IH 2512, 13 tracks, Released September 29, 1995, UPC 7-04724-25122-8, ASIN B000008PY2, audio CD. Recorded at Hog Creek, Oklahoma on June 1, 1978. Includes liner notes by Tom Mauchahty-Ware and Tony Isaacs. Reissue of [Mauchahty-Ware 1978]. See the Indian House web site. Contains 13 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Maxwell 1992] Timothy D. Maxwell and Kurt F. Anschuetz. “The Southwestern Ethnographic Record and Prehistoric Agricultural Diversity”, contained in [Killion 1992], 1992, pages 35–68. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Mazon 2009] Wendy E. Mazon. The Effect of the Breath Builder™ on Various Lung Functions and Musical Performance Abilities of Clarinet Players, Doctoral dissertation – The University of Arizona, 2009, 66 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to focus on the efficacy of a dynamic breath exerciser called the Breath Builder™ and its effects on clarinet players’ performance abilities and/or lung functions. The study sample consisted of 15 clarinetists, a combination of undergraduate and graduates from the clarinet studio at the University of Arizona, ages 18 – 27. The eight-week study consisted of two phases. During Phase 1, subjects in experimental group 1 used the Breath Builder™ three times a day, five times a week. The control group was not given Breath Builders™ and continued with their normal practice routine. In Phase 2, the control group was given Breath Builders™ and relabeled as experimental group 2. Experimental group 1 stopped using the Breath Builder™ and was relabeled as experimental group 3. Following this cessation, the subjects in experimental group 3 were measured to note any change in lung function or performance. Some of the pulmonary lung function measurements used for this study were, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP), Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in 1 second (MIP1), and Maximal Expiratory Pressure (MEP). Musical abilities measured were tone, note duration and phrase duration. A significant interaction effect was found regarding MIP and MIP1.

[McAllester 1949] David P. McAllester (1916–2006). Peyote Music, Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, Number 13, New York, 1949. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McAllester 1952] David P. McAllester. “Menomini Peyote Music”, contained in [Slotkin 1952], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, New Series, Volume 42, Part 4, published by the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, 1952, pages 681–700. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From [White-PM 2000]: This detailed analysis of the peyote music of the menomini Indians is Appendix VI of the extensive report by J. S. Slotkin on Menomini Peyotism that makes up volume 42, part 4 of the Transactions. Slotkin collected the musical material from the Menominei examined here. McAllester examines veariations in peyote music, the peyote style, the special songs in peyote, such as a funeral song, attitudes concerning peyote music, the special aura of sacredness about the music, and the pan-tribalism in peyote music. The music and singing for 24 peyote songs is provided.

[McAllester 1961] David P. McAllester. Indian Music in the Southwest, published by the Taylor Museum, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1961, 15 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McAllester 1962] David P. McAllester and Donald Nelson Brown (recording engineers and producers) (born 1937). Music of the Pueblos Apache and Navaho, published by the Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Arts Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Taylor Museum, KCMS-1204, 1962, ASIN B003UP4F44, audo LP and booklet. Reissued in [McAllester 2009]. Liner notes reissued in [McAllester 2011]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[McAllester 1971] David P. McAllester. Review of Night and Daylight Yeibichei by Boniface Bonnie; Tony Isaacs, Ethnomusicology, Volume 15, Number 1, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, January 1971, pages 167–170. Review of [Bonnie 1968]. Publication 850406 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McAllester 1982] David P. McAllester. “New Perspectives in Native American Music”, Perspectives of New Music, Volume 20, Number 1–2, Summer 1982, pages 433–446. Publication 942422 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McAllester 1996] David P. McAllester. Review of Cry for Luck: Sacred Song and Speech Among the Yurok, Hupa, and Karok Indians of Northwestern California, published by the Music Library Association, Inc., Published online 1994, retrieved April 26, 2010. See the The Free Library web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute

[McAllester 2009] David P. McAllester and Donald Nelson Brown (recording engineers and producers). Music of the Pueblos Apache and Navaho, Global Village Music, 17 tracks, September 18, 2009, audio CD. Reissue of [McAllester 1962]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[McAllester 2011] David P. McAllester and Donald Nelson Brown. Music of the Pueblos Apache and Navaho, published by Literary Licensing, LLC, April 2011, 12 pages, ISBN 1-258-00741-X (978-1-258-00741-6). Reissue of the liner notes of [McAllester 1962]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[McBride 2001] Bunny McBride. “Lucy Nicolar: The Artful Activism of a Penobscot Performer”, contained in [Perdue 2001], 2001, pages 141–159. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClain 1976] Ernest G. McClain; Siegmund Levarie (introduction); Patrick A. Heelan (editor). The Myth of Invariance — The Origin of the Gods, Mathematics and Music from the Ṛg Veda to Plato, published by Nicolas-Hays, Inc., York Beach, Maine, 1976, 216 pages, ISBN 0-89254-003-6 (978-0-89254-003-7). Reissued in [McClain 1984]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Synopsis: MYTH OF INVARIANCE explores the unifying symbolism of music and number so the reader can understand the secrets from Babylon, Egypt, Greece and the Bible - secrets hidden for centuries.

[McClain 1978] Ernest G. McClain. The Pythagorean Plato — Prelude to the Song Itself, published by Nicolas-Hays, Inc., York Beach, Maine, 1978, 204 pages, ISBN 0-89254-010-9 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClain 1981] Ernest G. McClain. Meditations through the Quran — Tonal Images in an Oral Culture, published by Nicolas-Hays, Inc., York Beach, Maine, 1981, 183 pages, ISBN 0-89254-010-9 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClain 1984] Ernest G. McClain; Siegmund Levarie (introduction); Patrick A. Heelan (editor). The Myth of Invariance — The Origin of the Gods, Mathematics and Music from the Ṛg Veda to Plato, published by Nicolas-Hays, Inc., York Beach, Maine, 1984, 216 pages, ISBN 0-89254-012-5 (978-0-89254-012-9). Reissue of [McClain 1976]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClain 2008] Ernest G. McClain. “A Sumerian Text in Quantified Archaeomusicology”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2008), The British Museum, London, December 4–6, 2008, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2008, pages 89–103. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: A cuneiform problem text dating about 2500 B.C. is about the partition of a grain constant. It is contended that it also defines a quantified musicology embodying the science of Pythagorean Greece, some 2000 years later.

[McClain 2010] Ernest G. McClain. “Egyptian Connections: Narmer Inscriptions as Sumerian Musicology”, Musical exchanges between Ancient Egypt and the Near East during, before and after the Hyksos Kings (ICONEA 2010), Chancellor's Hall, Senate House, University of London, December 15–17, 2010, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2010. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClain 2010a] Ernest McClain and Peter Blumsom. “Egyptian Connections: Narmer Instriptions as Sumerian Musicology”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2009-2010), Université de la Sorbonne, Paris, and Senate House, School of Musical Research, University of London, November 2009 and December 2010, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2010, pages 73–104, ISBN-13 978-1-4632-0182-1. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Conference summary: Interdisciplinary studies in archaeomusicology have been given a new direction by Richard Dumbrill's insight that theory evolved necessarily from scribal discipline rather than from Pythagorean fiction, and that ancient "god numbers" merit close inspection. Rapid advances in the understanding of cuneiform arithmetic during the last 20 years now give us new insight on scribal training and a universal competence with "octave doubling" that grounded "Egyptian duplatio", pervading the whole of ancient cosmology. The octave 2:1 was never "discovered", but always taken for granted—as routine as the alternation of day and night, and proved forever by Kilmer, Crocker and Brown: the seminal Babylonian: "Sounds From Silence" (album; 1976). Further consequences are explored in this paper.

[McCleskey 1998] Wayne McCleskey and John Sarantos. A Kokopelli Christmas — Songs for the Winter Seasons, First Edition (song book), published by Wind Warrior Publications, Seattle, WA, 1998, ISBN 0-9665334-0-2. Nakai tablature notation. Contains 110 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McCleskey 1998a] Wayne McCleskey and John Sarantos. A Kokopelli Songbook — Finger Chart Songbook, Volume 1: Folk and Traditional Songs, First Edition (song book), 1998. six-hole finger diagrams. Contains 24 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McClintock 1883] John McClintock and James Strong. Cyclopaedia of Biblical, Theological, and Ecclesiastical Literature, Volume 3, published by Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, 1883, 1,048 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McCollough 1938] Doriane Woolley McCullough (collector); José Juan, Isabelle Iske, Charles Whittman, Manuel Lowe, John Miles, Harvey Cawker, and Joseph Moffat (performers). [United States, Arizona, Sacaton, Pima Indians, 1938] [sound recording]/collected by Doriane Woolley McCullough. 268 sound discs: analog, 78 RPM, monophonic, 12-inch, with documentation. [United States, Arizona, Sacaton, Pima Indians, 1938] [sound recording] Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Indiana University Summary: Recorded by McCullough from July 16 to Oct. 13, 1938 at the Pima Indian Reservation in Sacaton, Arizona.
Pima songs and music.
Aluminum disc originals.
Accompanied by song texts in Pima with English translations, musical transcriptions, biographical information on informants, and correspondence between McCullough and George Herzog pertaining to the former's field work.
Indexed in Dorothy Sara Lee, Native North American Music and Oral Data (I.U. Press, 1979).

[McCord 2003] Beth K. McCord and Donald R. Cochran. “The Morell-Sheets Site: Refining the Definition of the Albee Phase”, contained in [Redmond 2003] Facing the Final Millennium: Studies in the Late Prehistory of Indiana, A.D. 700 to 1700, 2003, pages 32–60. The Morell-Sheets Site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[McCormack 1997] John McCormack (1884–1945). The Victor and HMV Recordings (1912–14), England, Romophone, 1997. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McCraty 2001] Rollin McCraty, Mike Atkinson, Dana Tomasino, and William P. Stuppy. “Analysis of Twenty-four Hour Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Panic Disorder”, Biological Psychology, Volume 56, May 2001, pages 131–150. Publication 11334700 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Growing evidence suggests that alterations in autonomic function contribute to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). This retrospective study employed 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of Holter records to compare autonomic function in PD patients (n=38) with healthy, age- and gender-matched controls. Both time and frequency domain measures were calculated, and a circadian rhythm analysis was performed. The SDNN index, 5-min total power, very low frequency (VLF) and low frequency (LF) power were significantly lower in panic patients relative to controls over the 24-h period. Hourly means were significantly lower during some of the waking hours as well as the latter part of the sleep cycle. In contrast, the mean RR interval, RMSSD and high frequency (HF) power were comparable in patients and controls. Results suggest that sympathetic activity is depressed in PD patients under usual life conditions, leading to a relative predominance of vagal tone. Findings of low HRV in PD patients are consistent with the high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this population, as well as with the emerging view of panic as a disorder involving reduced flexibility and adaptability across biological, affective and behavioral dimensions.

[McDermott 1941] John Francis McDermott (born 1902). A Glossary of Mississippi Valley French, 1673–1850, 1941. Publication glossaryofmissis00mcde on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McDermott 2007] John Francis McDermott (editor). Tixier's Travels on the Osage Prairies, published by Pratt Press, 2007, 336 pages, ISBN 1-4067-7355-7 (978-1-4067-7355-2), ASIN 1406773557, softcover. Translation and reissue of [Tixier 1844]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McElrath 2003] Susan McElrath. Register to the Papers of John Canfield Ewers, published by the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, 2003, 124 pages. Register to the Papers of John Canfield Ewers Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McGee 1995] T. McGee (editor). Taking a Stand: Essays in Honour of John Beckwith, contains [Keillor 1995], published by the University of Toronto Press, Toronto, Ontario, 1995, ISBN 0-8020-0583-7 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McGee-WJ 1894] W. J. McGee (1853–1912). “The Siouan Indians: A Preliminary Sketch”, Fifteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1893-94, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1894, pages 153–204, retrieved March 15, 2010. Director: J. W. Powell. Reissued in [McGee-WJ 2006] and [McGee-WJ 2008]. Publication annualreportofbu1518931894smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McGee-WJ 2006] W. J. McGee. The Siouan Indians, published by Project Gutenberg, October 23, 2006, 98 pages, retrieved April 17, 2010. Reissue of [McGee-WJ 1894]. See the Project Gutenberg Ebook #19628 web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McGee-WJ 2008] W. J. McGee. The Siouan Indians, published by BiblioBazaar, 2008, 74 pages, ISBN 1-4375-0044-7 (978-1-4375-0044-8). Reissue of [McGee-WJ 1894]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McGhee 1975] Robert J. McGhee and James A. Tuck. An Archaic Sequence from the Strait of Belle Isle, Labrador, Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada, Paper 34, published by the National Museum of Man, Ottawa, 1975, 135 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

Publisher's description: Description of a burial mound, over 7,000 years old, built by a band of Archaic Indian hunter-gatherers discovered in 1973.

[McGhee 1976] Robert J. McGhee. The Burial at l'Anse-Amour, published by the National Museum of Man, Ottawa, 1976, 24 pages, ISBN 0-660-00019-9 (978-0-660-00019-0), softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[McGhee 2011] Robert J. McGhee. “L'Anse Amour Site”, The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2011, retrieved April 8, 2011. See the Canadian Encyclopedia web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[McGlade 2004] John McGlade, Heng Yang, and Victor P. Pasko. “Effects of Solar Flares on the First Schumann Resonance Frequency”, NSF EE REU PENN STATE Annual Research Journal, Volume 2, 2004, pages 42–51. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Pitch-to-Frequency Calculator

Abstract: Variations in the exact Schumann Resonance frequencies occur due to changes in the conductivity profile of the Earth-ionosphere cavity. Aside from seasonal and diurnal cycles, these changes are also caused by factors such as X-ray bursts and high-energy particle precipitation from the sun. The discrete data we get from an FDTD model does not allow us to obtain the Schumann Resonance frequencies directly, and the resolution in the frequency domain is contingent upon sampling time. In this paper, the method of choice in determining the Schumann Resonance frequencies is through exponential approximation. Exponential approximation is effective because it can detect the slight shift in Schumann Resonance frequencies based on a short sampling time, which is desirable in order to reduce computer calculation time. In this paper we use the Prony Method of Exponential Approximation to find this slight frequency shift in a short sampling time.

[McGrady 2007] Angele McGrady. “Psychophysiological Mechanisms of Stress: A Foundation for the Stress Management Therapies”, contained in [Lehrer 2007], 2007, pages 16–37. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McIntosh 1987] W. E. McIntosh and Harvey Shell. Indiancraft, published by Naturegraph Publishers, Healdsburg, California, 1987, 142 pages, ISBN 0-87961-170-7 (978-0-87961-170-5). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Clear, concise instructions for acquiring materials & making many popular Native American handicrafts, such as warbonnets, dance bustles, dresses & shawls, moccasins, beadwork, Indian flute, bow & arrows, & much more. This is a hands-on text by ones who have made all the crafts they describe. Includes 10 pages of plains & woodland tribal designs. Fully illustrated.

[McIntyre 1983] M. E. McIntyre, R. T. Schumacher, and J. Woodhouse. “On the Oscillations of Musical Instruments”, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 74, Number 5, November 1983, pages 1325–1345. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Anatomy of the Native American Flute, Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[McKean 2012] Graham S. McKean. “Neanderthal Cognitive Ability and Technological Development”, Collegiate Journal of Anthropology, Volume 1, December 22, 2012. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McKern 1931] William C. McKern. “A Wisconsin Variant of the Hopewell Culture”, Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, Bulletin 10, Number 2, 1931. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[McKinney 1997] Smokey McKinney. Potawatomi Dictionary, July 2, 1997, retrieved October 28, 2012. See the Potawatomi Web Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[McLaughlin 2003] Castle McLaughlin; Hillel S. Burger (photographer); Mike Cross (contributor). Arts of Diplomacy: Lewis and Clark's Indian Collection, published by the University of Washington Press and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, October 2003, 416 pages, ISBN 0-295-98361-2 (University of Washington Press softcover edition), 0-295-98360-4 (University of Washington Press hardcover edition), 0-87365-843-4 (Peabody hardcover edition), 0-87365-844-2 (Peabody softcover edition) (978-0-295-98361-5 (University of Washington Press softcover edition), 978-0-295-98360-8 (University of Washington Press hardcover edition)). American Museum of Natural History call number F592.7.M35 2003. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seven citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (7)

Booklist description by Gilbert Taylor: With bicentennial observances of the Corps of Discovery's epic trek set to unfold over the next two years, the already huge specialty and popular literature about Lewis and Clark is about to expand.Though the landscape bears scant resemblance to the one Lewis and Clark originally viewed, American Indian artifacts collected by the expedition still exist. Harvard University's Peabody Museum holds some, each of which is exhaustively examined both photographically and textually in McLaughlin and her coauthors' scholarly opus. Yet their readership goes beyond academics, for an item's chain of provenance is fascinating and often rather mysterious in its own right. Further, the authors so thoroughly unpack the "text" of each object—a robe, calumet, or basket—that its owner emerges from the historical mists, if not as an identifiable individual, at least as someone whose personal and cultural life readers can vicariously appreciate.

[McLean 1964] Mervyn McLean. “Can Maori Chant Survive?”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 47, June 1964, pages 34–36. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: In almost every tribal area the traditional songs or waiata of the Maori people are now being heard less and less, and competent performers are becoming fewer. One is constantly told, ‘When the old people were alive it was different, but now there's hardly anyone left.’

At tangis and huis it sometimes happens that none of the old songs is performed at all, and it is left for action songs to fill the gap.

Why should this be so? And can anything be done about it?

This article will examine some of the reasons for the current decline of the traditional songs, and will try to suggest remedies. At the conclusion of the article, new means will be described which are becoming available to aid the revival of the songs.

That the songs are worth saving there can be no doubt. Their literary merit has been attested again and again. And it is beginning to be realised also that their musical merit is just as great.

[McLean 1964a] Mervyn McLean. “The Music of Maori Chant”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 47, June 1964, pages 36–38. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1964b] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part One”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 48, September 1964, pages 23–29. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1964c] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Two”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 49, November 1964, pages 35–39. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1965] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Four”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 51, June 1965, pages 23–27. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1965a] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Five”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 52, September 1965, pages 40–41. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1965b] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Six”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 53, December 1965, pages 39–40. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1966] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Seven”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 54, March 1966, pages 22–23. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1966a] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Eight”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 55, June 1966, pages 16–18. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1966b] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Nine”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 56, September 1966, pages 40–43. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1966c] Mervyn McLean. “Transcriptions of Authentic Maori Chant, Part Ten”, Te Ao Hou - The New World, Number 57, December 1966, pages 23–25. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1968] Mervyn McLean. “An Investigation of the Open Tube Maori Flute or Kooauau”, The Journal of the Polynesian Society, Volume 77, Number 3, published by Polynesian Society, September 1968, pages 213–241. Publication 20704559 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The kooauau is an instrument of the flute family made of wood or bone. Usually, kooauau are 5 to 6 inches long (12 to 15 cm.); most have three finger holes and all are open at both ends. When not in use, the instruments were often worn around the neck as an ornament and most accordingly have provision for suspension. In the wooden instruments the suspension hole is usually bored through a bulge on the back and in the bone instru ments it is bored close to one end. The wooden instruments are often elaborately carved and about a third of the bone instruments are decorated with incised lines.

[McLean 1974] Mervyn McLean. “The New Zealand Nose Flute: Fact or Fallacy?”, The Galpin Society Journal, Volume 27, May 1974, pages 79–94. Publication 841755 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McLean 1982] Mervyn McLean. “A Chronological and Geographical Sequence of Maori Flute Scales”, Man, New Series, Volume 17, Number 1, published by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, March 1982, pages 123–157. Publication 2802105 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Three populations of Maori flutes are examined, two of which can be dated archaeologically. They are: thirteen albatross-bone flutes from coastal sites in the South Island; eighteen stone flutes, mostly from a single site at Oruarangi in the North Island; and 110 made from wood, human bone, and ivory from ethnographic collections. A scale chronology and pattern of areal dispersion arrived at on musical grounds is matched with archaeological and ethnographic evidence.

[McLean 1996] Mervyn McLean. Maori Music, published by Auckland University Press, 1996, 418 pages, ISBN 1-86940-144-1 (978-1-86940-144-3). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Maori music records and analyses ancient Maori musical tradition and knowledge, and explores the impact of European music on this tradition. Mervyn McLean draws on diverse written and oral sources gathered over more than 30 years of scholarship and field work that yielded some 1300 recorded songs, hundreds of pages of interviews with singers, and numerous eye-witness accounts. The work is illustrated throughout with photos and music examples.

[McManamon 2009] Francis P. McManamon, Linda S. Cordell, Kent G. Lightfoot, and George R. Milner. Archaeology in America: Northeast and Southeast, Volume 1 of Archaeology in America: An Encyclopedia, published by ABC-CLIO, 2009, 424 pages, ISBN 0-313-33184-7 (978-0-313-33184-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The greatness of America is right under our feet. The American past-the people, battles, industry and homes-can be found not only in libraries and museums, but also in hundreds of archaeological sites that scientists investigate with great care. These sites are not in distant lands, accessible only by research scientists, but nearby-almost every locale possesses a parcel of land worthy of archaeological exploration. Archaeology in America is the first resource that provides students, researchers, and anyone interested in their local history with a survey of the most important archaeological discoveries in North America. Leading scholars, most with an intimate knowledge of the area, have written in-depth essays on over 300 of the most important archaeological sites that explain the importance of the site, the history of the people who left the artifacts, and the nature of the ongoing research.

Archaeology in America divides it coverage into 8 regions: the Arctic and Subarctic, the Great Basin and Plateau, the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, the Midwest, the Northeast, the Southeast, the Southwest, and the West Coast. Each entry provides readers with an accessible overview of the archaeological site as well as books and articles for further research.

[McNair 2009] Douglas S. McNair. Native American Flute and How We are as People Today, Chamber Music Today blog, July 3, 2009. See the Chamber Music Today web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McNutt 1984] James C. McNutt. “John Comfort Fillmore: A Student of Indian Music Reconsidered”, American Music, Volume 2, Number 1, published by the University of Illinois Press, Spring 1984, pages 61–70. Publication 3051963 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McPherson 2006] Gary E. McPherson (editor). The Child as Musican: A Handbook of Musical Development, published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, England, 2006, 528 pages, ISBN 0-19-853032-3 (978-0-19-853032-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mead 1903] Charles Williams Mead (1845–1928). The Musical Instruments of the Incas: A Guide Leaflet to the Collection on Exhibition in the American Museum of Natural History, Guide Leaflet Number 11, published by the American Museum of Natural History, July 1903, 31 pages. supplement to the American Museum Journal, Volume 3, Number 4. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mead 1924] Charles W. Mead. “The Musical Instruments of the Incas”, Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, Volume 15, Part 3, published by the American Museum Press, New York, 1924, pages 313–347. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Medeiros 2010] José Miguel Medeiros. Development of a Heart Rate Variability Analysis Tool, M.B.E. dissertation – Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal, September 2010, 92 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Heart Rate Variability (HRV) concerns the analysis of the phenomenon underlying the variability between consecutive heartbeats. During the last three decades, significant effort has been made to understand its physiological basis and implications in different pathologies. Such studies have revealed, among other aspects, that HRV its a mirror of the control actions exerted by the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) in the Sinoatrial (SA) node. Since the SA node is responsible for setting the heartbeat, the two branches comprising the ANS, sympathetic and parasympathetic, have a special role in controlling such variability.

The main goals behind this work were: to develop an open source, reliable and easy-to-use Graphical User Interface (GUI) able to perform a complete HRV analysis; to investigate and possibly implement alternative methods to perform an HRV analysis; and also to validate the developments achieved.

As a result of the work carried out, we have manage to develop a cross platform and full featured Python based GUI for HRV computation using the standard procedure based on ECG signals and another alternative methodology based on PPG signals. We have also conducted three different studies in order to analyze the validity of our tool. The first study aimed to validate our HRV GUI and revealed the absence of any significant differences between our GUI and a reference tool. The second study evaluated both specificity and sensitivity of the algorithm that we have developed to detect systolic peaks in PPG signals, where high performance levels were attained. Finally, the third study, aimed to validate the use of PPG signals as an alternative to ECG signals for computing HRV, revealed high levels of correlation between the same parameters computed from ECG and PPG signals acquired simultaneously.

[Melini 2008] Roberto Melini. “Possessed by the Great Mother: Music and Trance in Ancient Pompeii and in the Popular Tradition of Southern Italy”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2008), The British Museum, London, December 4–6, 2008, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2008, pages 1–9. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Meltzer 2003] David J. Meltzer. “Peopling of North America”. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mendel 1944] Arthur Mendel (1905–1979), Gustave Reese, and Gilbert Chase (editors). Papers Read at the International Congress of Musicology, International Congress of Musicology, New York, September 11–16, 1939, published by the Music Educators' National Conference for the American Musicological Society, New York, 1944, 336 pages. Publication papersreadatinte00amer on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mendes 2009] Wendy Berry Mendes. “Assessing Autonomic Nervous System Activity”, contained in [Harmon-Jones 2009], 2009, pages 118–147. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mendoza 1950] Vincente T. Mendoza. “Música indígena de México «Indigenous Music of Mexico»”, México en el Arte, Volume 9, in Spanish, 1950. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Classification of Flutes

[MenezesBastos 2007] Rafael José de Menezes Bastos; David Allan Rodgers (translation). “Música nas Sociedades Indígenas das Terras Baixas da América do Sul: Estado da Arte «Music in the Indigenous Societies of Lowland South America: The State of the Art»”, Mana, Volume 13, Number 2, October 2007, pages 293–316, retrieved May 30, 2012. See the SciELO web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The last thirty years have seen a remarkable growth in the ethnomusicology of the South American lowlands. The region has emerged from relative obscurity — a state in which it languished for decades, despite possessing some of the world's oldest descriptions of ‘primitive’ music — through the publication of a wide variety of texts on the musical production of its indigenous peoples, along with various attempts at regional and sub-regional comparison. This ethnomusicological output — much of it originating in Brazil from the early 1990s onwards — has been complimented by monographs and regional comparative studies from anthropologists specialized in other areas, whose work has frequently highlighted the importance of music (typically in connection with other art forms, cosmology, shamanism and philosophy) for a clearer understanding of the region. The resulting panorama is promising. However it also requires analysis, a fundamental element in determining paths for future research. Divided into two parts, the article approaches this endeavour by focusing on written production, making secondary use of phonographic, videographic and other documental forms. The first part of the text surveys the literature produced on the region's music over the period. In the second part, I reflect on the main features of indigenous music to emerge from the literature and propose a number of working hypotheses for future investigations.

[Meninski 1680] Franciscus à Mesgnien Meninski (1623–1698). Thesaurus Linguarum Orientalium, 1680. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Perfect Intervals

[Mercado 2005] Claudio Mercado. “Con Mi Flauta Hasta la Tumba «With My Flute to the Grave»”, Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino, Volume 10, Number 2, in Spanish, 2005, pages 29–49. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Based on the finding in central Chile of the burial of a boy next to his stone flute, or, antara (Aconcagua culture, Inca Diaguita Period, AD 1470-1540), an interpretation is made – from the author’s own experiences in today’s “cofradías chinas” (ritual musician-dance brotherhoods) in the region – about the reasons that would explain the close bond then and now between the “flautist” and his musical instrument. The motives for the permanence over time of the unique sound of these flutes, made with a specific technique (“complex tube”), noted since ancient times in the cultures of the southern Peruvian coastal desert, are discussed.

[Merlini 2008] Marco Merlini and Gheorghe Lazarovici. “Settling Discovery Circumstances, Dating and Utilization of the Tărtăria Tablets”, Acta Terrae Septemcastrensis, Number 7, published by the Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Sibiu, Romania, 2008, 232 pages. ISSN 1583-1817. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Merriam-AP 1951] Allan P. Merriam (1923–1980). “Flathead Indian Instruments and Their Music”, The Musical Quarterly, Volume 37, Number 3, published by the Oxford University Press, July 1951, pages 368–375, doi:10.1093/mq/XXXVII.3.368. [Merriam-AP 1953] is the related CD. Publication 739991 on JSTOR (subscription access). See the Musical Quarterly web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Merriam-AP 1953] Alan P. Merriam (field recording, liner notes); Barbara W. Merriam (field recording). Songs and Dances of the Flathead Indians, Folkways Ethnic Library Series, Folkways Records and Service Corp., FE 4445, 19 bands, 1953, audio LP. [Merriam-AP 1951] is a related paper. Reissued in [Merriam-AP 2007]. Library of Congress call number R 59-29. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Merriam-AP 1957] Alan P. Merriam and Warren L. d'Azevendo. “Washo Peyote Songs”, American Anthropologist, Volume 59, Number 4, published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., 1957, pages 615–641. Contains 7 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Merriam-AP 1964] Alan P. Merriam. The Anthropology of Music, Northwestern University African Studies, Volume 11, published by Northwestern University Press, 1964, 358 pages, ISBN 0-8101-0607-8 (978-0-8101-0607-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This is a comprehensive approach to music from the point of view of anthropology. The author maintains that ethnomusicology, by definition, must not divorce the sound-analysis of music from its cultural context of people thinking, acting, and creating.

[Merriam-AP 1967] Alan P. Merriam. Ethnomusicology of the Flathead Indians, Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology Series, Number 44, published by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, New York, 1967, xvii + 403 pages. Reissued in [Merriam-AP 2011]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[Merriam-AP 2007] Alan P. Merriam (field recording, liner notes); Barbara W. Merriam (field recording). Songs and Dances of the Flathead Indians, Smithsonian / Folkways Archival Series, Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings, FE 4445, 19 tracks, 2007, UPC 0-93070-44452-2, ASIN B00242W0V4, audio CD. [Merriam-AP 1951] is a related paper. Reissue of [Merriam-AP 1953]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: When different ways of life – white and American Indian – met one another on the Flathead Indian Reservation in western Montana, many of the tribe’s customs began to disappear. However, their indigenous music continued to be an extremely important source of pride and culture on the reservation. This album contains songs used for entertainment, religious practice, and personal power.

[Merriam-AP 2011] Alan P. Merriam. Ethnomusicology of the Flathead Indians. Reissue of [Merriam-AP 1967]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Merrill 1997] William L. Merrill, Marian Kaulaity Hansson, Candace S. Greene, and Frederick J. Reuss. A Guide to the Kiowa Collections at the Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, Number 40, publishted by the Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C., February 28, 1997, 443 pages. See the Smithsonian Institution Libraries web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

Abstract: This guide provides an overview of the extensive anthropological collections associated with the Kiowa Indians of Oklahoma housed in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. The vast majority of these collections are found in the Smithsonian's Department of Anthropology, located in the National Museum of Natural History. In the 1990s, the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma included over 10,000 enrolled members, more than half of whom resided in western Oklahoma. Before settling on a reservation in the second half of the nineteenth century, the Kiowas were nomadic bison hunters on the southern Plains who raided deep into Mexico. The Kiowa materials at the Smithsonian were collected for the most part after the creation of the Kiowa reservation, but the information they contain spans a period from before European contact to the late twentieth century. The guide, produced between 1985 and 1994, is divided into five major sections. Each of the first four sections focuses on a major component of the Smithsonian's Kiowa collection—;material culture, manuscripts, artwork, and photographs—;and includes background information on the collections as well as inventories and descriptions of them. The fifth section is a list of individuals whose names appear in association with the collections. This "List of Persons" indicates the specific materials in the collections with which each of these individuals is associated. The guide concludes with a summary of Smithsonian Kiowa collections located outside the Department of Anthropology and a bibliography of selected references on the Kiowa.

[Mersenne 1636] M. Mersenne. Du Genres de la Musique, Harmonie universelle, Book 3, Paris, in French, 1636, page 148. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mertens 1998] Joan R. Mertens. “Some Long Thoughts on Early Cycladic Sculpture”, Metropolitan Museum Journal, Volume 33, published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998, pages 7–22. Publication 1513004 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Messerschmidt 1911] L Messerschmidt (1870–1911). Keilschrifttexte aus Assur historischen Inhalts «Historical Cuneiform Texts from Assur», Volume 1, Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft in Assur (Excavations of the German Oriental Society in Assur), Wissenschaftliche Veröffentlichungen der deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft (WVDOG), Volume 16, published by J. C. Hinrich, Leipzig, in German, 1919, 362 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Designations for Cuneiform and Ancient Mesopotamian Clay Tablets

[Metallic 2005] Emmanuel N. Metallic, Danielle E. Cyr, and Alexandre Sévigny. The Metallic Mìgmaq-English Reference Dictionary, published by Presses Université Laval, December 2005, 392 pages, ISBN 2-7637-8015-6. Accompanying CD-ROM includes searchable full text. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Tribal Identification, Names of the Native American Flute

[Metersky 2010] Mark L. Metersky, Scott B. Bean, John D. Meyer, Miriam Mutambudzi, Barbara A. Brown-Elliott, Michael E. Wechsler, and Richard J. Wallace, Jr. “Trombone Player’s Lung: A Probable New Cause of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis”, Chest, Volume 138, Number 3, September 2010, pages 754–756, doi:10.1378/chest.10-0374. Publication 20823006 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Metzger 2006] L. Kay Metzger. “An Existential Perspective of Body Beliefs and Health Assessment”, Journal of Religion and Health, Volume 45, Number 1, published by Springer, Spring 2006, pages 130–146, doi:10.1007/s10943-005-9008-3. Publication 27512908 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Successful health assessments are ongoing and rely on a clinician/client interaction, which is influenced by both the client's and the clinician's beliefs about their bodies. These beliefs about the human body arise out of religious and cultural contexts. Theories often explain cultural context by comparison of dierences and similarities between the client and the clinician and/or between the client and the dominant culture. This approach can carry a bias inherent in the comparison to dominant beliefs held by those with the most power and economic advantage. The author suggests an existential approach in which client and clinician bodies interact each as adept, autonomous individuals with a conglomerate of beliefs about body and health.

[Metzger-F 2010] Flora Metzger, Amaryllis Haccuria, Gabriel Reboux, Nicole Nolard, Jean-Charles Dalphin, and Paul De Vuyst. “Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Due to Molds in a Saxophone Player”, Chest, Volume 138, Number 3, September 2010, pages 724–726, doi:10.1378/chest.09-2991. Publication 20822994 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Due to Molds in a Saxophone Player Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This 48-year-old patient was evaluated for an interstitial pneumonia. An open-lung biopsy showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. The CT scan appearance, showing mosaic ground-glass opacities in the ventilated parts of the lung, the centrolobular predominance of inflammation on the lung sections, and the presence of a lymphocytic alveolitis at BAL suggested a hypersensitivity pneumonitis. The patient was a white-collar worker and had no contact with pets, birds, drugs, or molds at home. He used to play the saxophone as a hobby. Two molds, Ulocladium botrytis and Phoma sp, were detected in the saxophone. Precipitating antibodies to these molds were present in his serum. An additional study confirmed the frequent colonization of saxophones with potentially pathogenic molds, such as Fusarium sp, Penicillium sp, and Cladosporium sp. Respiratory physicians should be aware of the risk of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in saxophone or perhaps other wind instrument players.

[Meymandi 2009] Assad Meymandi. “Music, Medicine, Healing, and the Genome Project”, Psychiatry (Edgemont), Volume 6, Number 9, September 2009, pages 43–49. Publication 19855860 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miceli 1974] Augusto P. Miceli. The Man With the Red Umbrella: Giacomo Costantino Beltrami in America, published by Claitor's Publishing, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1974, 183 pages, ISBN 0-87511-603-5 (978-0-87511-603-7). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Michalowski 2008] Piotr Michalowski. “Traveler's Tales: Observations on Musical Mobility in Mesopotamia and Beyond”, Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology (ICONEA 2008), The British Museum, London, December 4–6, 2008, editors: Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel, published by Iconea Publications, London, 2008, pages 117–124. See the ICONEA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The study of music in the ancient world is an area most open to anachronistic intrusion and the interference of modernity. The practice, experience, and significance of music, before the spread of mass culture and communication, occupied very different cultural spaces than they do today, often mediating between what was narrowly local and the world at large and it is obviously difficult to establish the truly local, culturally salient elements of such practice in specific societies. Specialists who work on the subject have often been keen to reconstruct the sounds made in Near Eastern palaces, temples, and taverns millennia ago, a pursuit that may be harmless, but is, to my mind at least, nothing but folly. Even if we can reconstruct certain scales, that tells us nothing about music as such, because music is so much more than scales. To me music is organized sound that is embedded in specific social practices; we will never know the sounds and how they were structured, but we can learn something about the social realization and significance of this organized sound, and of its possible significance for the ways in which people imagined their own identities. As a small contribution to such a project, I would like to address a few issues concerning matters of local and global aspects of music in ancient Mesopotamia. Because such practices involve a constantly shifting tension between innovation and tradition, and because of space constraints, I will limit my inquiries to the earlier phases of Mesopotamian history.

[Michalowski 2010] Piotr Michalowski. “Learning Music: Schooling, Apprenticeship, and Gender in Early Mesopotamia”, contained in [Pruzsinszky 2010a], 2010, pages 199–240. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia (2)

[Michelson 1921] Truman Michelson (1879–1938). The Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 72, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., in Fox and English, 1921, 83 pages + 4 plates. Publication bulletin721921smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Names of the Native American Flute (4)

[Michelson 1925] Truman Michelson. “The Mythical Origin of the White Buffalo Dance of the Fox Indians”, Fortieth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1918-1919, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1925, pages 23–289 + plate 1 + figure 1, retrieved March 15, 2010. Publication annualreportofbu40smithso on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Names of the Native American Flute (3)

[Middleton 1998] Julie Forest Middleton. Songs for Earthlings, published by Emerald Earth Publishing, Sebastopol, California, 1998, 400 pages, ISBN 0-9663715-2-6 (978-0-9663715-2-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Earth My Body - Sheet Music for Native American Flute

[Mietus 2002] J. E. Mietus, C. K. Peng, I. Henry, R. L. Goldsmith, and A. L. Goldberger. “The pNNx Files: Re–examining a Widely Used Heart Rate Variability Measure”, Heart, Volume 88, 2002, pages 378–380, doi:10.1136/heart.88.4.378 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract:
Objective: To re-examine the standard pNN50 heart rate variability (HRV) statistic by determining how other thresholds compare with the commonly adopted 50 ms threshold in distinguishing physiological and pathological groups.
Design: Retrospective analysis of Holter monitor databases.
Subjects: Comparison of HRV data between 72 healthy subjects and 43 with congestive heart failure (CHF); between sleeping and waking states in the 72 healthy subjects; and between 20 young and 20 healthy elderly subjects.
Main outcome measures: Probability values for discriminating between groups using a family of pNN values ranging from pNN4 to pNN100.
Results: For all three comparisons, pNN values substantially less than 50 ms consistently provided better separation between groups. For the normal versus CHF groups, p < 10-13 for pNN12 versus p < 10-4 for pNN50; for the sleeping versus awake groups, p < 10-21 for pNN12 versus p < 10-10 for pNN50; and for the young versus elderly groups, p < 10-6 for pNN28 versus p < 10-4 for pNN50. In addition, for the subgroups of elderly healthy subjects versus younger patients with CHF, p < 0.007 for pNN20 versus p < 0.17 for pNN50; and for the subgroup of New York Heart Association functional class I–II CHF versus class III–IV, p < 0.04 for pNN10 versus p < 0.13 for pNN50.
Conclusions: pNN50 is only one member of a general pNNx family of HRV statistics. Enhanced discrimination between a variety of normal and pathological conditions is obtained by using pNN thresholds as low as 20 ms or less rather than the standard 50 ms threshold.

[Miksza 2009] Peter Miksza. “An Exploratory Study of a Confluence Model of Preservice Music Teacher Creativity «職前音樂教師創造性匯合模式的探索性研究»”, Music Education Research International, Volume 3, 2009, pages 29–43. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This study investigated the viability of adapting the Sternberg and Lubart (1995) confluence model of creativity in the context of preservice instrumental music teaching. The model suggested that one’s ability to be creative hinged on six distinct yet interrelated personal resources: intellect, knowledge, thinking style, personality, motivation, and environmental constraint. Two undergraduate music education students teaching in a band outreach program participated in this study. Data sources included (a) the Sternberg and Wagner (1991) Thinking Styles Questionnaire (O’Hara & Sternberg, 2001), (b) the Costa and McCrae (1992) NEO-PIR, (c) a researcher-adapted Motivation for Teaching Questionnaire, (d) objective measures of teaching effectiveness across seven weeks, (e) an objective measure of student achievement, (f) semi-structured, open-ended interviews, and (g) consensual assessment of music teacher creativity. Independent judges verified the reliability of observational data. Results indicated that the music teacher creativity rankings from the consensual assessment corresponded with the respective teacher profiles resulting from the psychological measures and interviews, which was consistent with Sternberg and Lubart’s theory. The teacher ranked most creative also (a) had the highest legislative thinking score on the Thinking Styles Questionnaire, (b) had the highest openness score on the NEO-PI, (c) reported a willingness to take risks, (d) reported the highest level of intrinsic motivation, and (e) considered the environment to be open to creative possibilities. Although teaching effectiveness ratings improved over time for both participants, the teacher rated more creative was also more effective overall.
Translation: 本研究調查在職前器樂教學背景下運用Sternberg and Lubart (1995)創造性匯
合模式的可行性。這一模式提出一個人的創造能力取决于六大截然不同而互
相關聯的個體資源,即智力、知識、思維風格、個性、動機和環境限制。兩
位在樂隊拓展課程中任教的本科音樂教育學生參與了本研究。數據來源包括
(a) Sternberg and Wagner (1991)的思維風格問卷(O’Hara & Sternberg, 2001),
(b) Costa and McCrae (1992) 的NEO-PI-R人格問卷,(c)經研究者調適的教學
動機問卷,(d)七周教學有效性的客觀測量,(e)學生成績的客觀測量,(f)半結
構、開放式訪談,以及(g)音樂教師創造性的評估。所觀察數據的信度經獨立
鑒定人檢驗。研究結果說明,音樂教師的創造性評級源自教師創造力的評估,
此評估與由心理測量和訪談而得的教師剖面相符合。而這正與Sternberg和
Lubart’s的理論一致。最具創造性的教師(a)在思維風格問卷中立法思考水平
分最高,(b)在NEO-PI-R人格問卷中開放水平分最高,(c)表示願意承受風險,
(d)表現出最高水平的內在動機,幷且(e)認爲周圍環境對各種創造可能性是開
放的。儘管兩位參與者的教學有效性水平與日俱增,但從整體上看較具創造
性的教師的教學則更爲有效。

[Miller 1910] Horace Alden Miller (1872–1941). Melodic Views of Indian Life, published by Clayton F. Summy, Chicago, 1910, 19 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Indianist Movement

[Miller 1917] Horace Alden Miller. Four Indian Themes, published by Breitkopf & Härtel, New York, 1917. New York Public Library call number 592401. Publication fourindianthemes00mill on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miller-DC 1916] Dayton C. Miller (1866–1941). “A 32-Element Harmonic Synthesizer”, Journal of the Franklin Institute, January 1916, pages 51–81. pub-pre-1923. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miller-DC 1916a] Dayton C. Miller. The Science of Musical Sounds, published by The Macmillan Company, New York, 1916, 286 pages. pub-pre-1923. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miller-DC 1935] Dayton C. Miller. Anecdotal History of the Science of Sound To the beginning of the 20th Century, First Edition, published by MacMillan, 1935, 114 pages, ASIN B0014UUTPQ Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: About Flutopedia.com, Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Miller-EB 2011] Eric B. Miller. Bio-guided Music Therapy: A Practitioner’s Guide to the Clinical Integration of Music and Biofeedback, published by Jessica Kingsley, London, 2011, 256 pages, ISBN 1-84905-844-X (978-1-84905-844-5). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Bio-Guided Music Therapy explores the clinical integration of music and biofeedback, providing the practitioner with a rationale, historical context and detailed step-by-step instructions for implementing real-time physiological data driven music therapy. This practical guide introduces the fundamental principles of biofeedback and explores the use of music therapy interventions within the context of achieving skills in self-regulation of physiological response. This book looks at the primary modalities of biofeedback, in conjunction with the assignment of digitally sampled musical voices to specific body functions. Music therapy interventions covered include guided imagery to music, toning, mantra meditation, drumming and improvisation. This book clearly demonstrates how these techniques can be successfully applied to the treatment of stress, high blood pressure, back pain, insomnia, migraine, neuromuscular deficiencies and depression, as well as being an effective therapy for clients with autism spectrum disorders and attention deficit disorder. Instructive and accessible, this book will prove an essential resource for students and practitioners of music therapy, biofeedback practitioners, social workers, psychologists and healing arts professionals.

[Miller-EB 2014] Eric B. Miller and Clinton F. Goss (born 1957). “An Exploration of Physiological Responses to the Native American Flute”, ISQRMM 2013, Athens, Georgia, July 26, 2013, January 24, 2014, 17 pages, arXiv:1401.6004. An Exploration of Physiological Responses to the Native American Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Your Brain on Flute (3)

Abstract: This pilot study explored physiological responses to playing and listening to the Native American flute. Autonomic, electroencephalographic (EEG), and heart rate variability (HRV) metrics were recorded while participants (N = 15) played flutes and listened to several styles of music. Flute playing was accompanied by an 84% increase in HRV (p < .001). EEG theta (4–8 Hz) activity increased while playing flutes (p = .007) and alpha (8–12 Hz) increased while playing lower-pitched flutes (p = .009). Increase in alpha from baseline to the flute playing conditions strongly correlated with experience playing Native American flutes (r = +.700). Wide-band beta (12–25 Hz) decreased from the silence conditions when listening to solo Native American flute music (p = .013). The findings of increased HRV, increasing slow-wave rhythms, and decreased beta support the hypothesis that Native American flutes, particularly those with lower pitches, may have a role in music therapy contexts. We conclude that the Native American flute may merit a more prominent role in music therapy and that a study of the effects of flute playing on clinical conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hypertension, anxiety, and major depressive disorder, is warranted.

[Miller-EB 2014a] Eric B. Miller and Clinton F. Goss. “Trends in Physiological Metrics During Native American Flute Playing”, Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 2014, doi:10.1080/08098131.2014.908944 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Your Brain on Flute (2)

Abstract: This letter reports on specific physiological trends that were found during periods of playing Native American flutes for several autonomic and EEG measures. A slight downward trend in mean heart rate from 72.76 to 71.69 BPM accompanied by a significant increase in blood volume pulse (p < .001) suggests vasodilation, possibly indicating reduced autonomic arousal. EEG results show significant increases in theta (4–8 Hz, p < .001) and alpha (8–12 Hz, p = .005) bandwidths during flute playing. Alpha enhancement may indicate increased relaxation conducive to a meditative state. Displayed in graphical chart form are standard scores for percent change between the first half and second half of Native American flute playing conditions. These physiological trends while playing Native American flutes, taken together, suggest the possibility of a relaxation response.

[Miller-MK 2000] Mary K. Miller. “Music of the Neanderthals”, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2000 Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., February 17–22, 2000, Dispatches from the Field, February 21, 2000, retrieved September 27, 2011. Music of the Neanderthals Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miller-MR 2004] Myles R. Miller and Nancy A. Kenmotsu. “Prehistory of the Jornada Mogollon and Eastern Trans-Pecos Regions of West Texas”, contained in [Perttula 2004], 2004, pages 205–265. See the Texas Beyond History web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: A Timeline of Flute Development

[Miller-RK 1996] Ronald K. Miller, James E. Enote, and Cameron L. Martinez. “Tribal Experiences and Lessons Learned in Riparian Ecosystem Restoration”, contained in [Shaw 1996] Desired Future Conditions for Southwestern Riparian Ecosystems: Bringing interests and concerns together, 1996, pages 198–202. Tribal Experiences and Lessons Learned in Riparian Ecosystem Restoration Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Tribal Identification

Abstract: Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few. This paper describes tribal case examples and approaches in riparian management which may advance discussions of cultural values in resource management for rural and developing communities such as those on tribal lands in the United States.

[Mills 1917] W. C. Mills. “The Feurt Mounds and Village Site”, Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Volume 26, 1917, pages 305–449. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (2)

[Mills-A 1960] Alan Mills (1913–1977). Canada's Story in Song, Smithsonian / Folkways, FW03000, 42 tracks, 1960, audio CD. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: The Huron Carol - Sheet Music for Native American Flute (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

Abstract: Chants of the Inuit, ballads of French settlers, battle tunes of the British, and songs of Canadian self-rule: singer Alan Mills combines all four to present a rich tapestry of Canadian history in music. Extensive liner notes with full lyrics accompany this collection, which includes and expands upon the material released on Folkways FW03001, O’Canada: A History in Song.

[Minor 1972] Marz Minor and Nono Minor. The American Indian Craft Book, published by the Popular Library, 1972, ASIN B0006VV21E Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Minor 1978] Marz Minor and Nono Minor. The American Indian Craft Book, Bison Books Edition, published by the University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1978, 416 pages, ISBN 0-8032-0974-6 (hardcover), 0-8032-5891-7 (softcover) (978-0-8032-0974-9 (hardcover), 978-0-8032-5891-4 (softcover)). See the University of Nebraska Press web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Miraliakbari 2008] Homan Miraliakbari and Fereidoon Shahidi. “Lipid Class Composition, Tocopherols and Sterols of Tree Nut Oils Extracted with Different Solvents”, Journal of Food Lipids, Volume 15, published by Blackwell Publishing, 2008, pages 81–96. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Care and Maintenance of the Native American Flute (3)

Abstract: The chemical compositions of tree nut oils were examined. The oils of almonds, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts were extracted using hexane and chloroform/methanol. The chloroform/methanol system afforded a higher oil yield for each tree nut type examined (pine nuts had the highest oil content while almonds had the lowest). The lipid class compositions of the tree nut oils were analyzed using the thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detector and showed that triacylglycerols were the predominant lipid class present. Smaller amounts of sterols, sterol esters, phospholipids and sphingolipids were also present. The fatty acid compositions of the tree nut oils were analyzed using gas chromatography, showing that oleic acid was the predominant fatty acid in all samples except pine nut and walnut oils, which contained high amounts of linoleic acid. The sterol and stanol content and compositions were analyzed using gas chromatography; b-sitosterol was the predominant sterol present in all samples, with lower amounts of campesterol, stigmasterol, D5-avenasterol, 22-nordehydrocholesterol, 24-methylenecholesterol, cholesterol, cholestanol and b-sitostanol also present. The tocopherol compositions were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, showing that a- and g-tocopherols were the predominant tocopherol homologs present; however, d- and b-tocopherols were also detected in some samples.

[Mitchell 1992] T. C. Mitchell. “The Music of the Old Testament Reconsidered”, Palestine Exploration Quarterly, Volume 124, 1992, pages 124–143. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

Abstract: Surviving examples of musical instruments and representations of them show that during the first half of the first millennium B.C. a considerable range of types was in use in Mesopotamia and Egypt, as well as in north Syria and south-east Asia Minor. Since there are numerous references in the Old Testament to music and musicians it is a reasonable assumption that, though there are few representations from Palestine, similar types were in use. The corpus derived from outside sources comprises: I. Strings: (a) harp, (b) lyre, (c) lute; II. Wind: (d) vertical flute (end blown like the modern recorder), (e) double-pipe, (f) horn, (g) trumpet; III. Percussion: (h) drum, (i) tambour (like a tambourine without the jingles), (j) cymbals, (k) clappers, (l) sistrum, (m) vibroframe.

[Mitchill 1820] Samuel L. Mitchill. Letter from Dr. Samuel L. Mitchill, of New York, to Samuel M. Burnside, Esq. - Corresponding Secretary of the American Antiquarian Society — New York, January 13, 1817, Archaeologia Americana: transactions and collections of the, Volume 1, 1820, pages 313–317. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mithen 2005] Steven Mithen. The Singing Neanderthals: The Origins of Music, Language, Mind and Body, published by George Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 2005, 374 pages, ISBN 0-297-64317-7 (978-0-297-64317-3), ASIN 0297643177 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Evolution of Music - Flutopedia.com (2)

From Publishers Weekly: Mithen (The Prehistory of Mind; After the Ice) draws on archaeological record and current research on neurology and genetics to explain how and why humans think, talk and make music the way they do. If it sounds impenetrably academic, it isn't: Mithen acts as a friendly guide to the troves of data on the evolution of man (and myriad sub-mysteries of the mind, music, speech and cognition), translating specialist material into an engrossing narrative casual readers will appreciate. Beginning with a survey of modern theories of the evolution of language, music and thought, Mithen cherry picks ones that lay the groundwork for the book's second (and most substantial) part, which applies those ideas to 4.5 million years of evolutionary history, beginning with the earliest known hominid, Ardipithecus ramidus, and ending with Homo sapiens. Mithen's work here is equally remarkable, but perhaps because this is his area of specialty, the findings are less accessible to the average reader: they hinge largely on subtle differences in the interpretation of archaeological sites and the dating of artifacts. However, Mithen's expertise in the science and history of his subject is combined with a passion for music that makes this book enjoyable and fascinating. Readers from most academic disciplines will find the work of interest, as will general readers comfortable with research-based argument and analysis.

[Miyashita 2009] Mizuki Miyashita and Shirlee Crow Shoe. “Blackfoot Lullabies and Language Revitalization”, contained in [Reyhner 2009], 2009, pages 183–190. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This paper describes a small scale collaborative effort between a linguist and a native speaker, who is also a language educator, to collect Blackfoot lullabies to use as language teaching and learning tools. We discuss the implications of using lullabies in language revitalization and describe our fieldwork of lullaby collection, data organization and the transcription of lyrics and melody.

[Miyata 1991] Kōhachirō Miyata (born 1938); David Lewiston (producer); David Loeb (liner notes). Shakuhachi — The Japanese Flute, Elektra Nonesuch Records, 9-72076-2, 5 tracks, May 14, 1991, total time 33:17, ASIN B000005IWN, Audio CD. First released in 1977 on an LP record as Nonesuch H-72076. Contains 5 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia, Hon Shirabe - Sheet Music for Native American Flute (2)

Review by Bruno Deschênes on AllMusic.com: This CD is re-release of an LP issued in 1997 by Nonesuch. It is probably one of the most known and most sold shakuhachi records in the West. When one looks around for Japanese music, it may be the one found the most often. Kôhachiro Miyata is considered one of the leading shakuhachi players in Japan, along such musicians as Katsuya Yokoyama, Goro Yamaguchi, or Aoki Reibo, for example, as well as being an active composer of works for traditional Japanese instruments. On this CD, he presents us with five of the most known pieces of the Japanese honkyoku repertoire (honkyoku referring to solo pieces for shakuhachi). The one thing that strikes the most about Miyata's playing is the purity and quality of his sound. There are many different styles of playing the shakuhachi, some breathy, some more technical, some with particular playing techniques, generally according to the style of a particular school of playing. Miyata's style is natural, looking for a quality and purity of sound in each and every note. A must!

[Mjoseth 2007] Jeannine Mjoseth and Mamie Bittner. 3D Scanner May Save Vanishing Languages from Extinction, September 20, 2007. 3D Scanner May Save Vanishing Languages from Extinction Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: A Brief History of the Native American Flute

[Mockingbird 2005] Mockingbird. Drenched, 2005. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Simple Gifts - Sheet Music for Native American Flute

[Moll 2002] Laura A. Moll. “Strategies Used in O’odham Creation Legends to Present Cultural Values”, Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Symposium about Language and Society - Austin, April 12-14, 2002, Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Symposium about Language and Society - Austin, April 12-14, 2002, Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Symposium about Language and Society – Austin, April 12–14, 2002, editors: Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Symposium about Language and Society - Austin, April 12-14, 2002, Texas Linguistic Forum, Volume 45, 2002, pages 117–126. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Tribal Identification

[Moloney 2005] Orla Moloney. Evaluation of the Music in Healthcare Project 2000 – 2004 — A Partnership Project between Music Network and the Midland Health Board (HSE Midland Area), published by Canterbury Christ Church University, Folkestone, Kent, England, March 2005, 62 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Monastra 2005] Vincent J. Monastra, Steven Lynn, Michael Linden, Joel F. Lubar, John Gruzelier, and Theodore J. LaVaque. “Electroencephalographic Biofeedback in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder”, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Volume 30, Number 2, June 2005, pages 95–114, doi:10.1007/s10484-005-4305-x. Publication 16013783 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Historically, pharmacological treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been considered to be the only type of interventions effective for reducing the core symptoms of this condition. However, during the past three decades, a series of case and controlled group studies examining the effects of EEG biofeedback have reported improved attention and behavioral control, increased cortical activation on quantitative electroencephalographic examination, and gains on tests of intelligence and academic achievement in response to this type of treatment. This review paper critically examines the empirical evidence, applying the efficacy guidelines jointly established by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) and the International Society for Neuronal Regulation (ISNR). On the basis of these scientific principles, EEG biofeedback was determined to be “probably efficacious” for the treatment of ADHD. Although significant clinical improvement was reported in approximately 75% of the patients in each of the published research studies, additional randomized, controlled group studies are needed in order to provide a better estimate of the percentage of patients with ADHD who will demonstrate such gains in clinical practice.

[Montagu 2004] Jeremy Montagu. “How Old is Music?”, The Galpin Society Journal, Volume 57, May 2004, pages 171–182. Publication 25163800 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Montagu 2005] Jeremy Montagu. On the Measurement of the Musical Scales of Various Nations and Introducting the Ellis, 2005, 5 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Montagu 2007] Jeremy Montagu. Origins and Development of Musical Instruments, published by Scarecrow Press, Inc., 2007, 257 pages, ISBN 0-8108-5657-3 (978-0-8108-5657-8), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Montgermont 2008] N. Montgermont, B. Fabre, and P. De La Cuadra. “Gesture Synthesi: Basic Control of a Flute Physical Model”, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 123, Number 5, 2008, pages 5698–5702. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

Abstract: In the flute family, the oscillation is due to the instability of a jet at the output of a channel coupled with an acoustic resonator. Recent physical models allows to simulate the behavior of the complete instrument, but we still lack a convincing way to drive them. The simulation of the isolated instrument must be completed with a modelization of the control exerted by the flutist. Depending of the instrument of the flute family, the number and type of control parameters are differents. For example, in a recorder the player blows inside a fixed channel built by the instrument maker and in the case of the transverse flute, the channel is shaped by the player's lips during the playing. This paper presents a simple model of flute player, based on measurements carried on instrumentalists playing on a recorder or a transverse flute. The model is generating the basic features of the instrument control in order to produce given pitches and dynamics. The coupling with a flute physical model allows to study its validity.

[Monzo 1998] Joseph L. Monzo. JustMusic — A New Harmony Representing Pitch as Prime Series, Third Edition, December 1998, 212 pages. JustMusic Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Monzo 2000] Joseph L. Monzo. A New Reconstruction of the Hurrian Hymn, Encyclopedia of Tuning, 2000, retrieved September 28, 2011. A New Reconstruction of the Hurrian Hymn Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Monzo 2002] Joseph L. Monzo. Speculations on Sumerian Tuning, Updated August 10, 2002, retrieved December 9, 2011. Speculations on Sumerian Tuning Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moon-GP 1917] Grace Purdie Moon; Karl Moon (photograph). The Indian Flute-Song, St. Nicholas, Volume 44, Part 2, published by The Century Co., New York, June 1917, page 688. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Poetry for the Native American Flute

[Moon-KR 2010] Krystyn R. Moon. “The Quest for Music’s Origin at the St. Louis World’s Fair: Frances Densmore and the Racialization of Music”, American Music, Volume 28, Number 2, published by the University of Illinois Press, Summer 2010, pages 191–210, doi:10.1353/amm.0.0053. Publication 10.5406/americanmusic.28.2.0191 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mooney 1894] James Mooney (1861–1921). The Siouan Tribes of the East, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 22, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1894, 101 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mooney 1894a] James Mooney. The Collected Works of James Mooney, Part One, published on Archive.org, 7 tracks, 1894, retrieved on April 16, 2010. Publication CollectedWorksOfJamesMooney on Archive.org (open access). Contains 7 songs. The Collected Works of James Mooney Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mooney 1894b] James Mooney. The Collected Works of James Mooney, Part Two, published on Archive.org, 5 tracks, 1894, retrieved on April 16, 2010. Publication CollectedWorksOfJamesMooneyPartTwo on Archive.org (open access). Contains 5 songs. The Collected Works of James Mooney Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mooney 1896] James Mooney. “The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890”, Fourteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1892-93, Part 2, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1896, pages 641–1136, retrieved March 15, 2010. J. W. Powell, Director. Publication annualreportofbu14218921893smit on Archive.org (open access). Contains 18 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mooney 1898] James Mooney. “Calendar History of the Kiowa”, Seventeenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1895-96, Part 1, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1898, pages 129–468, retrieved March 15, 2010. Publication annualreportofbu17smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Moore 1916] Clarence B. Moore (1852–1936). “Some Aboriginal Sites on the Green River, Kentucky — Certain Aboriginal Sites on the Lower Ohio River - Additional Investigations on the Mississippi River”, Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Volume 16, Philadelphia, 1916, pages 431–511. Cornell University Library call number E74.M6 M63. Publication cu31924104075126 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moore-G 1991] Gerald Moore. Native American Tunes — In Three and Four Part Settings for SAT & SATB Recorders or Flutes (song book), Susato Press Native American Music Series, published by Susato Press, Brasstown, North Carolina. Catalog number FOS04. See the Susato Press web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From the Susato web site: Music in three and four part settings by Gerald Moore. For SAT (Soprano/Alto/Tenor) and SATB (Soprano/Alto/Tenor/Bass) Recorders or Flutes. Plus 14 settings of tunes from Susato Edition FOS03 (previous edition)

[Moore-G A] Gerald Moore. Eight Native American Songs & Dances — In 3-Part Settings for Native American Flutes, Pennywhistles, or Soprano, Alto and Tenor Recorders (song book), Susato Press Native American Music Series, published by Susato Press, Brasstown, North Carolina, comb binding. Catalog number FOS36. See the Susato Press web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moore-RS 1991] Randall S. Moore. “Comparison of Children's and Adults' Vocal Ranges and Preferred Tessituras in Singing Familiar Songs”, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Number 107, Winter 1991, pages 13–22. Publication 40318417 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Two studies investigated children's and adults 1 potential vocal ranges and preferred tessituras in singing familiar songs. The first study tested 90 children's singing ranges and their chosen tonalities for singing "America." The second study recorded 100 pre-service teachers' singing ranges and their selected tonalities for singing familiar songs. Results indicated that both sets of subjects had nearly identical range spans for singing: children averaged 24.5 semitones and adults, 24.8 semitones. Children's mean range was higher (G₃ to G#₄) than adult females (E₃ to F₃). Mean tessitura findings revealed that all subjects regardless of age sang familiar songs in the bottom part of their potential singing range, that is, 5 semitones above their lowest vocal limit and 10 semitones below their highest vocal limit. Findings suggest that teachers and children may unwittingly sing in low tessituras unless reminded to lift their voices. Teacher education programs are encouraged to alert new teachers to perform songs in suitable ranges for children.

[Moorehead 1891] Warren K. Moorehead (1866–1939). “The Indian Messiah and the Ghost Dance”, The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, Volume 13, Number 3, May 1891, pages 161–167. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1894] Warren K. Moorehead. “The Sioux Messiah”, The Archaeologist, Volume 2, Numbers 5 and 6, May–June 1894, pages 146–149 and 168–170. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1900] Warren K. Moorehead. Prehistoric Implements — A Reference Book: A Description of the Ornaments, Utensils, and Implements of Pre-Columbian Man in America, published by, R. Clarke, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1900, 431 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1905] Warren K. Moorehead. Prehistoric Relics — An illustrated catalogue describing some eight hundred and fifty different specimens, comp. from the standard authorities in archaeology, published by, The Andover Press, Andover, Massachusetts, 1905, 165 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1911] Warren K. Moorehead. The Stone Age in North America — An Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Implements, Ornaments, Weapons, Utensils, etc of the Prehistoric Tribes in North America, In Two Volumes, published by, Constable, London, 1911, 457+417 pages. Reissued in [Moorehead 1987]. Publications stoneageinnortha01mooruoft and stoneageinnortha02mooruoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1917] Warren K. Moorehead. Stone Ornaments Used by Indians in the United States and Canada — Being a Description of Certain Charm Stones, Gorgets, Tubes, Bird Stones and Problematical Forms, published by, A. H. Clark and The Andover Press, Cleveland, Ohio and Andover, Massachusetts, 1917, 448 pages. alternate title: "Stone ornaments of the American Indian". Publication stoneornamentsus00mooruoft on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 1987] Warren K. Moorehead. The Stone Age in North America — An Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Implements, Ornaments, Weapons, Utensils, etc of the Prehistoric Tribes, published by, Depot, Ltd., December 1987. Reissue of [Moorehead 1911]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moorehead 2007] Warren K. Moorehead. The American Indian in the United States, 1850–1914, published by, Kessinger Publishing, LLC, 2007, 468 pages, ISBN 0-548-32105-1 (978-0-548-32105-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moos 1894] Jean Moos. “The Harmonic Nature of Musical Scales”, Music, Volume 6, published by The Music Magazine Publishing Company, Chicago, May–October 1894, pages 13–36, 151–162, and 293–300. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moraveji 2011] Neema Moraveji, Ben Olson, Truc Nguyen, Mahmoud Saadat, Yaser Khalighi, Roy Pea, and Jeffrey Heer. “Peripheral Paced Respiration: Influencing User Physiology during Information Work”, ACM User Interface Software & Technology (UIST) 2011, Santa Barbara, California, October 16–19, 2011, 2011, 5 pages. Peripheral Paced Respiration Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: We present the design and evaluation of a technique for influencing user respiration by integrating respirationpacing methods into the desktop operating system in a peripheral manner. Peripheral paced respiration differs from prior techniques in that it does not require the user’s full attention. We conducted a within-subjects study to evaluate the efficacy of peripheral paced respiration, as compared to no feedback, in an ecologically valid environment. Participant respiration decreased significantly in the pacing condition. Upon further analysis, we attribute this difference to a significant decrease in breath rate while the intermittent pacing feedback is active, rather than a persistent change in respiratory pattern. The results have implications for researchers in physiological computing, biofeedback designers, and human-computer interaction researchers concerned with user stress and affect.

[Morelet 1864] Arthur Morelet (1809–1892). Journal du Voyage de Vasco da Gama «Journal of the Voyage of Vasco da Gama», published by Louis Perrin, Lyon, France, in French, 1864, xxx + 140 pages. Publication journalduvoyaged00velh on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[MorenoGarcia 2006] Marta Moreno-García and C. Pimenta. “O aerofone de Cacela — Notas sobre a identificação osteológica e taxonómica de um instrumento musical «The Aerophone Cacela - Notes on Osteological Identification and Taxonomy of a Musical Instrument»”, O Arqueólogo Português, Series 4, Number 24, in Portuguese, 2006, pages 401–410. O aerofone de Cacela Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: In this paper we present the anatomical and taxonomical identification of a small musical instrument of five holes fashioned from bone. This item was one of the archaeological objects collected by Estácio da Veiga at Cacela at the end of the 19th century. In spite of it having entered the MNA in 1894 it remained unpublished. Comparison with bone elements present in the vertebrate reference collection of the Archaeozoology Lab at the IPA and observation of the bone section from both endings allow us to identify it as the right tibiotarsus (leg bone) of a Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber), a long-legged bird commonly found in the salty and moorland areas of the Algarve coast. Issues related to ethnomusicology and “archaeomusicology” of the Iberian Peninsula, where wind musical instruments showing some similarities to this one from Cacela occur, are discussed.

[Morey 1997] Carl Morey. Music in Canada: A research and information guide, Annotated Edition, Music Research and Information Guides, published by Routledge, 1997, 304 pages, ISBN 0-8153-1603-8 (978-0-8153-1603-9), ASIN 0815316038, hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morey A] Robert James Morey. Fanfare for the American Indian Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morford 2007] James B. Morford. A Study of the Pedagogy of Selected Non-Western Musical Traditions in Collegiate World Music Ensembles, Master of Music In Music Education dissertation – Division of Music, College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 2007, 98 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Music teachers are often influenced by pedagogical practices in the collegiate ensembles in which they performed. Opportunities to participate in collegiate world music ensembles have increased in recent decades; West African ensembles and steel bands represent the second and third most common of these in the United States. The absence of scholarly research regarding the nature of the teaching and learning processes that occur in these non-Western ensembles represents a significant problem in music education. In this study, two collegiate West African ensemble directors and two collegiate steel band directors were interviewed using an instrument developed by the researcher to investigate the pedagogical practices that occur in their ensembles. Content analysis revealed that considerable consistencies and discrepancies exist between the directors’ responses regarding teaching strategies, repertoire selection, and educational goals. Results indicate that the development of broadly applicable world music pedagogy is not appropriate.

[Morgan 1851] Lewis H. Morgan (1818–1881). League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, Rochester, New York, 1851, 477 pages. Reissued in [Morgan 1901] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, [Morgan 1922] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, Two volumes in one, New Edition, and [Morgan 1995] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 1877] Lewis H. Morgan. Ancient Society, published by MacMillan & Company, London, 1877. Reissued in [Morgan 1944]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 1901] Lewis H. Morgan. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, published by Dodd and Mead, New York, 1901. Reissue of [Morgan 1851] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 1904] Lewis H. Morgan; Herbert M. Lloyd (editor of additional matter) (born 1862). League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, Two volumes in one, New Edition, published by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York, 1904, 676 pages. Reissue of [Morgan 1851] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 1922] Lewis H. Morgan; Herbert M. Lloyd (editor of additional matter). League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, Two volumes in one, New Edition, published by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York, 1922, 676 pages. Reissue of [Morgan 1851] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois. Contains 1 song. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Morgan 1944] Lewis H. Morgan; Tariq Sharif (composition). Ancient Society, First Indian Edition, published by Bharti Library, Booksellers & Publishers, 145 Cornwallis Street, Calcutta, 1944. Reissue of [Morgan 1877], Reissued online in [Morgan 2004]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 1995] Lewis H. Morgan. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, published by World Publications, Massachusetts, 1995, 124 pages, ISBN 1-57215-124-2 (978-1-57215-124-6), ASIN 1572151242. Reissue of [Morgan 1851] League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois. League of the Ho-dé-no-sau-nee or Iroquois (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morgan 2004] Lewis H. Morgan; Ibne Hasan (transcription). Ancient Society, published by the Marxist Internet Archive, 2004, retrieved March 13, 2010. transcribed from the 1944 edition. Reissue of [Morgan 1944]. See the Ancient Society web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morley 2003] Iain Morley. The Evolutionary Origins and Archaeology of Music: An Investigation into the Prehistory of Human Musical Capacities and Behaviours, Using Archaeological, Anthropological, Cognitive and Behavioural Evidence, Ph.D. Dissertation – Cambridge University, Cambridge University, Darwin College Research Report, DCRR-002, published by Cambridge Universith, Cambridge, October 2003, 265 pages. Electronic Edition January 12, 2006. Report DCRR-002. The Evolutionary Origins and Archaeology of Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia (2)

Excerpt from the Abstract: The research presented in this dissertation examines the evidence for the emergence of the capacities underlying musical behaviours, their interrelationship, development and ultimate manifestation in the Palaeolithic. A multidisciplinary approach is taken ... A synthesis of the findings from these various disciplines and sources of evidence concludes the thesis, proposing that musical capacities have their foundations in inter-specific tonal emotional vocal expression, and rhythmic-motor coordination of corporeal musculature in the execution of such vocalisations. These increased in complexity throughout the Homo lineage, and diverged from linguistic capacities with the development of lexicon and syntax; symbolic associations and diversity occurred with Homo sapiens, who were carrying out sophisticated instrumental musical behaviours upon their arrival in Europe.

[Morley 2006] Iain Morley. “Mousterian Musicianship? — The Case of the Divje Babe I Bone”, Oxford Journal of Archaeology, Volume 25, Number 4, 2006, pages 317–333. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The reputed Neanderthal ‘flute’ from the Slovenian site of Divjebabe I has stimulated much interest and detailed research since the original publication of its discovery in 1997. In spite of nearly ten years’ worth of analysis and discussion its status as an artefact has remained ambiguous;nevertheless it is still frequently cited as a ‘flute’. This paper examines theliterature and research regarding this object, and finds that much of theambiguity regarding the object’s status derives from the literature itself. It concludes that there is no need to invoke hominin agency in explaining the features of the bone.

[Morris 1925] Earl H. Morris (1889–1956). “Exploring the Canyon of Death: Remains of a People Who Dwelt in Our Southwest at Least 4,000 Years Ago are Revealed”, The National Geographic Magazine, Volume 48, Number 3, September 1925, pages 263–300. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave, The Development of Flutes in North America

[Morris 1936] Earl H. Morris. “Early Date Archaeology”, Tree Ring Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 4, April 1936, pages 34–36. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Morris 1938] Earl H. Morris. “Mummy Cave”, Natural History Magazine, Volume 42, Number 2, September 1938, pages 127–138. Publication naturalhistory42newy on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morris 1939] Earl H. Morris. Archaeological Studies in the La Plata District, Southwestern Colorado and Northwestern New Mexico, published by the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D. C., 1939. Publication 519. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morris 1951] Earl H. Morris. “Basketmaker III Human Figurines from Northeastern Arizona”, American Antiquity, Volume 17, Number 1, July 1951, pages 33–40. Publication 277353 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morris 1954] Earl H. Morris and Robert F. Burgh. Basketmaker II Sites near Durango, Colorado, Carnegie Institution Monograph Series, Publication 604, Washington, D.C., 1954, 135 pages, 116 illustrations. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Morris-EA 1959] Elizabeth Ann Morris. “Basketmaker Flutes from the Prayer Rock District, Arizona”, American Antiquity, Volume 24, Number 4, April 1959, pages 406–411. Publication 276601 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: Flutopedia Image Detail: Detail of the Feather Decoration of an Anasazi Flute, Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave (3), The Flutes of Pueblo Bonito

[Morris-EA 1959a] Elizabeth Ann Morris. Basketmaker Caves in the Prayer Rock District, Northeastern Arizona, doctoral dissertation – Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tuscon, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tuscon, 1959. Same title as [Morris-EA 1980], but this is a different publication. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morris-EA 1980] Elizabeth Ann Morris. “Basketmaker Caves in the Prayer Rock District, Northeastern Arizona”, Anthropological Papers, Number 35, published by the University of Arizona Press, Tuscon, Arizona, June 1, 1980, xvi + 158 pages, ISBN 0-8165-0499-7 (978-0-8165-0499-2), softcover. Same title as [Morris-EA 1959a], but this is a different publication. Library of Congress call number 79-020149. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave, The Development of Flutes in North America

[Morris-F 1913] Frances Morris (1866–1955). Catalog of the Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments: Oceanica and America, Volume 2, published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1913, xxi + 333 pages, retrieved April 18, 2010. Title page says 1904, Copyright is December 1913. Publication catalogueofcrosb02metr on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: Names of the Native American Flute (5)

[Morris-R 2007] Rebecca Morris. A Shroud of Ochre — A Study of Pre-Contact Mortuary Ochre Use in North America, Masters thesis – University of Leicester, England, April 2007, 81 pages, ISBN-13 978-3-640-60785-3 (e-book), 978-3-640-60768-6 (book), doi:10.3239/9783640607853 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

Abstract: Only recently has the study of ochre use in mortuary contexts by prehistoric groups taken a key place in archaeological research. Most often, this research has primarily taken the form of debates over ochre’s purpose and significance among these people. To date, no study has researched the extent of Pre-Contact mortuary ochre use in North America or the cultural characteristics common among its practitioners. This study seeks to establish patterns of commonality based on a comparison of ten North American prehistoric groups whose mortuary ochre use is well-documented. Using a criterion of eight cultural traits that are common indicators of cultural complexity, the study examines the hypothesis that the use of ochre in burials was more commonly found in complex societies. The results, although inconclusive in determining the viability of the hypothesis, indicate patterns of cultural commonality and help to define the spatial and temporal distribution of those groups who used ochre in mortuary contexts.

[Morris-S 1995] Sam Morris. The Nez Perce Music Archive: The Sam Morris Collection, published by the Northwest Interpretive Association, Seattle, Washington, 1995, 2 compact discs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morris-SP 2007] S. P. Morris and R. Laffineur. Epos. Reconsidering Greek Epic and Aegean Bronze Age Archaeology, Aegaeum 28, Proceedings of the 11th International Aegean Conference, The J. Paul Getty Villa and UCLA, Los Angeles, California, April 20–23, 2006, published by the Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium, 2007. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morrison 2012] Ian Morrison and Stephen Clift. Singing and Mental Health, published by Canterbury Christ Church University, Folkestone, Kent, England, September 2012, 24 pages, ISBN-13 978-1-909067-03-5 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morse 1926] Constance Morse. Music and Music-Makers, published by Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York, 1926, 364 pages. Publication musicandmusicmak002568mbp on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Morse 1968] Constance Morse. Music and Music-Makers, 1968. Library of Congress call number 68-54363. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moss 1919] Claude Russell Moss and A. L. Kroeber. “Nabaloi Songs”, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, Volume 15, Number 2, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, May 19, 1919, pages 187–206, retrieved April 17, 2010. Publication nabaloisongs00mossrich on Archive.org (open access). Contains 14 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moss 2004] Donald Moss. “Heart Rate Variability and Biofeedback”, Psychophysiology Today: The Magazine for Mind-Body Medicine, Volume 1, 2004, pages 4–11. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Heart rate variability (HRV) is a critical marker of a healthy organism. Low HRV predicts greater morbidity and mortality after heart attack, and also predicts death by all causes. HRV biofeedback can increase the adaptive and coherent variability in heart rate, and moderate the symptoms of asthma, COPD, and other autonomically mediated medical conditions. Diaphragmatic breathing, cognitive relaxation, and positive emotion are conducive to optimal increases in HRV.

[Moss-D 2010] Donald Moss. “Two Hearts on the Path to Heartful Living”, contained in [Bhave 2010], 2010, pages 201–210. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The present chapter describes two hearts, viz. the bio-electric pump of anatomy and the human heart of poetry and philosophy. This latter heart is the centre of the soul, the abode of love, caring and emotion. The chapter introduces phenomenology as an approach aiming to illuminate the individual's immediate experience of the body of life, and of health and illness. It describes the intertwining of the scientific heart and the human heart in emotion and in illness. The human lives are swept in Immediate emotion and feeling, and this subjective emotion impacts the medical and the poetic heart at once. Living heart-fully as a pathway toward heart health is advocated.

[Motz 2011] Randy Motz, Pat Smith, Bob Gonder, Jeff Svengsouk, and Jackie Rogers. “Flute Haven 2011”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2011, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2011, pages 13–14. See the INAFA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moule 1914] Arthur Evans Moule (1836–1918). The Chinese People;A Handbook on China, published by the E. S. Gorham, New York, 1914, 469 pages. Publication chinesepeoplehan00moul on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Moyle 1988] Richard M. Moyle. “The Niuean Nose Flute”, Anthropos, Band 83, 1988, pages 541–546. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[MR 2011] Mississippi Records and Canary Records. Brass Pins And Match Heads: International 78s, Mississippi Records and Canary Records, MR-083 and 004, 13 tracks, 2011, audio LP. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[Mullen 2003] Nicole Mullen; Ira Jacknis, Barbara Takiguchi and Liberty Winn (contributors). “Ishi: A Yahi Indian”, published by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 2003, 26 pages. Teaching tool for grades 4-6. Ishi: A Yahi Indian Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Muller 1996] Dario Müller. The American Indianists, two CDs, Volume 1 and 2, Marco Polo, 8.223715 and 8.223738, October 31, 1996, ASIN B00000463I, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Indianist Movement

[Muller-M 1988] Mette Müller. “Reed-Pipe of the Vikings or the Slavs? — An Early Find from the Baltic Region”, contained in [Hickmann-E 1988], 1988. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Mumford 1981] Bryan D. Mumford. “Fipple Flute”, United States Design Patent D258,364, Granted February 24, 1981, 2 pages, retrieved December 5, 2009. Fipple Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Patents and Patent Applications Related to Flute Construction

[Munzel 2002] S. Münzel, F. Seeberger, and W. Hein. “The Geißenklösterle Flute-Discovery, Experiments, Reconstruction”, contained in [Hickmann-E 2002], 2002, pages 107–118. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Munzel 2004] Susanne C. Münzel and Nicholas J. Conard. “Change and Continuity in Subsistence during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic in the Ach Valley of Swabia (South-west Germany)”, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, Volume 14, published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2004, pages 225–243, doi:10.1002/oa.758 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

Abstract: This paper examines the faunal assemblages from Middle Palaeolithic cave sites in the Ach Valley and views them in a broader chronological context along with the Upper Palaeolithic assemblages of the region. We present data from the key Middle Palaeolithic sites of Geißenklösterlen, Sirgenstein, Große Grotte and Kogelstein. Except Kogelstein, which is a hyena den, the other three sites served as cave bear hibernation dens, where cave bear is the most abundant species. The most frequent game species during the Upper Palaeolithic are horse, mammoth and reindeer. But these animals are mainly represented by specific skeletal elements, which were important as raw material for the production of organic tools. The large variety of organic tools made from bone, antler, and ivory, and the refuse resulting from their production in Upper Palaeolithic layers stands incontrast to the extreme rarity of organic tools and production debris in Middle Palaeolithic layers. The faunal assemblages in the Ach Valley document continuity in the seasonal use of the landscape and the preferred game, but reflect changes in the use of sites and organic technology between the Middle and the Upper Palaeolithic. Based on the faunal and lithic assemblages from the caves of the Ach Valley, most of the sites were used more intensively in the Upper Palaeolithic than in the Middle Palaeolithic. If these assemblages provide representative samples, the available data suggest lower population densities and greater mobility of Neanderthals during the Middle Palaeolithic than of modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic.

[Murie 1981] James R. Murie and Douglas R. Parks. Ceremonies of the Pawnee, Two Volumes, Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, Number 27, published by the Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C., 1981, viii + 497 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Myers 1993] Helen Myers. Ethnomusicology: Historical and Regional Studies, Volume 2 of The Norton/Grove handbooks in music, Volume 2 of Ethnomusicology, published by W. W. Norton & Company, 1993, 541 pages, ISBN 0-393-03378-3 (978-0-393-03378-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Complementing Ethnomusicology: An Introduction, this volume of studies, written by world-acknowledged authorities, places the subject of ethnomusicology in historical and geographical perspective. Part I deals with the intellectual trends that contributed to the birth of the discipline in the period before World War II. Organized by national schools of scholarship, the influence of 19th-century anthropological theories on the new field of "comparative musicology" is described. In the second half of the book, regional experts provide detailed reviews by geographical areas of the current state of ethnomusicological research.

[Myres 1899] John Nowell Linton Myres and Max Hermann Ohnefalsch-Richter. A Catalogue of the Cyprus Museum, With a Chronicle of Excavations Undertaken Since the British Occupation, and Introductory Notes on Cypriote Archaeology, published by The Clarendon Press, Oxford, England, 1899. Publication catalogueofcypru00myre on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

 
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