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References - G

This page lists references with citation tags that begin with the letter G. For other references and a documentation on how these references are cited, see the main references page. You can also click on these direct links to the various pages:

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References - G

[Gadalla 2000] Moustafa Gadalla. Egyptian Harmony — The Visual Music, published by the Tehuti Research Foundation, Greensboro, North Carolina, 2000, 191 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gadalla 2002] Moustafa Gadalla. Egyptian Rhythm — The Heavenly Melodies, published by the Tehuti Research Foundation, Greensboro, North Carolina, 2002, 239 pages, ISBN 1-931446-02-4 (978-1-931446-02-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Discover the cosmic roots of Egyptian musical, vocal, and dancing rhythmic forms. Learn the fundamentals (theory and practice) of music in the typical Egyptian way: simple, coherent, and comprehensive. See the fallacy of present-day musical theory and practice. Review a detailed description of the major Egyptian musical instruments, playing techniques, functions, etc. Recognise the human body as a musical orchestra in tune with the universe. Discover the Egyptian rhythmic practices in all aspects of their lives. This book will make your heart sing.

[Gadolou 2012] Anastasia Gadolou. “Life on Board the Antikythera Shipwreck”, contained in [Kaltsas 2012], 2012, pages 50–56. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gage 2001] Bruce Gage. “The Making of Native American Style Flutes”, The Woodwind Quarterly, Number 22, 2001, pages 53–62. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: How to Tie the Block on a Native American Flute (2)

[Gainza 2009] Mikel Gainza. “Automatic Musical Meter Detection”, 2009. Automatic Musical Meter Detection Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gale-A 1949] Albert Gale (recordings, harmonization, and drawings); Martha Brockway Gale (explanatory material and glossary); Beatrice Krones and Max Krones (accompaniments and English text); Mary Finley Fry (illustrations). Songs and Stories of the American Indians, Series: A World in Tune, Book 9, published by the Neil A. Kjos Music Company, Park Ridge, Illinois, 1949, ASIN B002AE2KWK Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Description by Folkway Books: Contains 22 songs with music and words. Recorded and harmonized by Albert Gale. Accompaniments and English texts for the songs by The Krones, Beatrice and Max. Original laguage words are also included. Includes a brief introduction for each song about the tribe and how this song fits in. Also a discussion of Indian Instruments (Drums, Rattles, and Flutes).

[Galpin 1903] F. W. {Francis William} Galpin. “The Whistles and Reed Instruments of the American Indians of the North-West Coast”, Proceedings of the Musical Association, Volume 29, March 10, 1903, pages 115–138. Publication 765327 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Galpin 1929] F. W. {Francis William} Galpin. “The Sumerian Harp of Ur”, Music & Letters, Volume 10, Number 2, published by Oxford University Press, April 1929, pages 108–123, doi:10.1093/ml/X.2.108. Publication 726035 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Galpin 1937] F. W. {Francis William} Galpin. The Music of the Sumerians — And Their Immediate Successors, the Babylonians and Assyrians, published by Cambridge University Press, 1937, ASIN B002N1WMZ0. Reissued in [Galpin 2011]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Galpin 2011] F. W. {Francis William} Galpin. The Music of the Sumerians — And Their Immediate Successors, the Babylonians and Assyrians, published by Cambridge University Press, February 17, 2011, 160 pages, ISBN 0-521-18063-5 (978-0-521-18063-4). Originally published in 1937. Reissue of [Galpin 1937]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

Publisher's description: Its author, Francis Galpin, has produced a thorough and carefully researched account of the music of the Sumerians and their immediate predecessors, the Babylonians and Assyrians. On its publication, this book was one of the few studies to concentrate on the music of the ancient civilisations of modern-day Iraq. Today, it still holds great value for all interested in the study of the ancient production and use of music and musical instruments. The work's chapters focus in turn on percussion, wind and stringed instruments, before exploring the musical scales of these societies and the roles that music and performance have played in their history and culture. Numerous photographic plates also provide fascinating examples of Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian instruments, as well as documenting the ways in which the performance of music was represented on the tombs and tablets of these ancient societies.

[Gamble 2004] Clive Gamble and Martin Porr (editors). The Individual Hominid In Context: Archaeological Investigations of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic Landscapes, Locales and Artefacts, published by Routledge, 2004, 336 pages, ISBN 0-415-28433-3 (978-0-415-28433-2). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This volume explores new approaches to the remarkably detailed information that archaeologists have for the study of our earliest ancestors. Previous investigations of human evolution in the Paleolithic period have conventionally been from an ecological and behavioral point of view. The emphasis has been on how our early ancestors made a living, decided what to eat, adapted through their technology to the conditions of existence and reacted to changing ice age climates. The "Individual Hominid in Context" takes a different approach.

Rather than explaining the archaeology of stones and bones as the product of group decisions, the contributors investigate how individual action created social life. This challenge to the accepted standpoint of the Paleolithic brings new models and theories into the period; innovations that are matched by the resolution of the data that preserve individual action among the artifacts. The book brings together examples from recent excavations at Boxgrove, Schoningen and Blombos Cave, and the analyses of findings from Middle and Early Upper Pleistocene excavations in Europe, Africa and Asia. The results will revolutionize the Paleolithic as archaeologists search for the lived lives among the empty spaces that remain.

[Garaj 2006] Bernard Garaj. “The Fujara — A Symbol of Slovak Folk Music and New Ways of its Usage”, Proceedings from the 16th International Meeting, ICTM Study Group on Folk Musical Instruments, Studia Instrumentorum Musicae Popularis, Volume 16, 2006, pages 86–94. ISSN 1392–2831. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Europe

Abstract:
Subject: The fujara as the most significant musical instrument of the Slovak folk music.
Purpose of Study: To present how an originally three-hole flute of shepherds in central parts of Slovakia has became a symbol of culture, nation and country.
Methods: Historical, descriptive.

[Garcia 2010] Francisco Garcia Diaz-Castroverde. Acquisition and Study of Blowing Pressure Profiles in Recorder Playing, Masters dissertation – Universitat Pompeu, Fabra, Barcelona, 2010, 117 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

[Garcia 2011] Francisco Garcia, Leny Vinceslas, Josep Tubau, and Esteban Maestre. “Acquisition and Study of Blowing Pressure Profiles in Recorder Playing”, Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Oslo, Norway, May 30 – June 1, 2011, 2011, pages 124–127. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This paper presents a study of blowing pressure profiles acquired from recorder playing. Blowing pressure signals are captured from real performance by means of a a low-intrusiveness acquisition system constructed around commercial pressure sensors based on piezoelectric transducers. An alto recorder was mechanically modified by a luthier to allow the measurement and connection of sensors while respecting playability and intrusiveness. A multi-modal database including aligned blowing pressure and sound signals is constructed from real practice, covering the performance space by considering different fundamental frequencies, dynamics, articulations and note durations. Once signals were pre-processed and segmented, a set of temporal envelope features were defined as a basis for studying and constructing a simplified model of blowing pressure profiles in different performance contexts.

[Gardenhire 2003] Damon Gardenhire (text); John Jernigan (photographs). “How a Man Saved a Flute: The Stradivarius of America's Original Woodwind, the Indian Flute”, Oklahoma Today, Volume 53, Number 6, November/December 2003, pages 46–49. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[GarnNunn 2004] Pamela G. Garn-Nunn and James M. Lynn. Calvert's Descriptive Phonetics Transcription Workbook, Third Edition, published by Thieme Medical Publishers, 2004. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Garrett 1977] Steven Garrett and Daniel K. Stat (Daniel K. Statnekov). “Peruvian Whistling Bottles”, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 62, Number 2, August 1977, pages 449–453, doi:10.1121/1.381507. Peruvian Whistling Bottles Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Measurements were made of the frequency and sound pressure level from 73 ceramic whistling bottles blown by compressed air. The bottles represent nine pre-Columbian civilizations which inhabited the north and central coasts and highlands of Peru during a 2000-year time span from 500 B.C. to A.D. 1550. We have found that Peruvian whistling bottles group acoustically by culture. The bottles are generally regarded by anthropologists as utilitarian liquid containers with the whistle providing an amusing method of venting. We are suggesting an alternative interpretation of the bottles as having been specifically produced as whistles. We base this interpretation on the clustering of frequencies by individual cultures, the fact that the frequencies fall in the region of the ear's greatest sensitivity, and the high sound pressure levels produced by the bottles when blown orally.

[Gary 2007] Ken Gary. The Flute — Origin, History, and Symbology, 2007. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gasparyan 1983] Djivan Gasparyan (born 1928). I Will Not Be Sad in this World Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia

[Gatliff 2007] Robert Gatliff. “The Man With the Red Umbrella and the Flute He Collected in 1823”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2007, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2007, pages 14–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Beltrami Flutes - The Earliest Known Wooden Native American Flute (2)

[Gatliff 2010] Robert Gatliff. FluteTree.com Songbook, 2010, retrieved February 5, 2010. Nakai tablature notation, finger diagrams for many flute makers. See the Flute Tree web site. Contains 112 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gauldin 1983] Robert Gauldin. “The Cycle-7 Complex: Relations of Diatonic Set Theory to the Evolution of Ancient Tonal Systems”, Music Theory Spectrum, Volume 5, published by the University of California Press on behalf of the Society for Music Theory, Spring 1983, pages 39–55. Publication 746094 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gelo 1988] Daniel L. Gelo. “Comanche Songs, English Lyrics, and Formal Continuity”, European Review of Native American Studies, Volume 2, Number 2, 1988, pages 2–7. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gelo 1988a] Daniel L. Gelo. “Comanche Songs, English Lyrics: Context, Imagery, and Continuity”, Storia Nordamericana, Volume 5, Number 1, 1988, pages 137–146. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[George 1962] Graham George. “Songs of the Salish Indians of British Columbia”, Journal of the International Folk Music Council, Volume 14, published by the International Council for Traditional Music, January 1962, pages 22–29. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[George-AR 1979] Andrew R. George. “Cuneiform Texts in the Birmingham City Museum”, Iraq, Volume 41, Number 2, published by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, Autumn 1979, pages 121–140. Publication 4200108 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[George-AR 1999] Andrew R. George. “What’s New in the Gilgamesh Epic?”, Bulletin of the Canadian Society for Mesopotamian Studies, Volume 34, 1999, pages 51–58. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia (3)

[George-AR 2003] Andrew R. George. The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic — Introduction, Critical Edition and Cuneiform Texts, Volume 1, 2003, 986 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[George-AR 2003a] Andrew R. George. The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Babylonian Epic Poem and Other Texts in Akkadian and Sumerian, Reprint edition, published by Penguin, 2003, 228 pages, ISBN 0-14-044919-1 (978-0-14-044919-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

Publisher's description: Miraculously preserved on clay tablets dating back as much as four thousand years, the poem of Gilgamesh, king of Uruk, is the world's oldest epic, predating Homer by many centuries. The story tells of Gilgamesh's adventures with the wild man Enkidu, and of his arduous journey to the ends of the earth in quest of the Babylonian Noah and the secret of immortality. Alongside its themes of family, friendship and the duties of kings, the Epic of Gilgamesh is, above all, about mankind's eternal struggle with the fear of death.

[George-AR 2007] Andrew George. “Babylonian and Assyrian: A History of Akkadian”, contained in [Postgate 2007], 2007, pages 31–71. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[GersonKiwi 1952] Edith Gerson-Kiwi. “Migrations and Mutations of Oriental Folk Instruments”, Journal of the International Folk Music Council, Volume 4, 1952, pages 16–19. Publication 835835 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gevirtz 2008] Richard Gevirtz and Constance Dalenberg. “Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback in the Treatment of Trauma Symptoms”, Biofeedback, Volume 36, Number 1, Spring 2008, pages 22–23. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback in the Treatment of Trauma Symptoms Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Recent research in the neurobiology of trauma supports the likelihood of more effective treatment with the inclusion of somatic techniques such as heart rate variability biofeedback. In this article, an argument is made for integration of heart rate variability biofeedback with cognitive behavioral techniques in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. Some preliminary results are reported together with a detailed case history.

[Gevirtz 2011] R. Gevirtz. Cardio-respiratory Psychophysiology: Gateway to Mind-body Medicine, BFE conference workshop, Munich, Germany, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Giardino 2004] Nicholas D. Giardino, Leighton Chan, and Soo Borson. “Combined Heart Rate Variability and Pulse Oximetry Biofeedback for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Preliminary Findings”, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Volume 29, Number 2, June 2004, pages 121–133, doi:10.1023/B:APBI.0000026638.64386.89. Publication 15208975 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of an intervention that included heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback and walking with pulse oximetry feedback to improve functioning and quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Twenty patients with COPD participated in 5 weekly sessions of HRV biofeedback and 4 weekly sessions of walking practice with oximetry feedback, with instructions for daily home practice. Primary outcomes measures were the distance walked in 6 min (6MWD) and overall quality of life, as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Secondary outcomes included measures of self-efficacy, self-reported disability, anxiety, depression, dyspnea before and after the 6MWD, and HRV at the frequency of respiration during spontaneous and paced breathing. After 10 weeks of training, participants showed statistically and clinically significant improvements in 6MWD and quality of life. Significant changes were also seen in self-efficacy, disability, dyspnea before and after the 6MWD, and HRV amplitude during spontaneous breathing. We conclude that our intervention is feasible for patients with COPD and that further research using a randomized controlled design is warranted.

[Giatti 2001] Anna Giatti and Mara Miniati. Acoustics and Its Instruments «l'Acustica e I Suoi Strumenti», published by Giunti Industrie Grafiche S.p.A., in Italian and English, 2001, 144 pages, ISBN 88-09-02183-5 (978-88-09-02183-9), softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gibbon 2003] Guy E. Gibbon. The Sioux: The Dakota and Lakota Nations, published by Wiley-Blackwell, 2003, 328 pages, ISBN 1-55786-566-3 (978-1-55786-566-3). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Tribal Identification

Publisher's description: This book covers the entire historical range of the Sioux, from their emergence as an identifiable group in late prehistory to the year 2000. The author has studied the material remains of the Sioux for many years. His expertise combined with his informative and engaging writing style and numerous photographs create a compelling and indispensable book.

[Gibbs 2003] Victor Gibbs (principal investigator). A Cultural Resources Overview of the San Andres National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, March 2003, 111 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

[Gibson 2004] Sophie Gibson. Aristoxenus of Tarentum and the Birth of Musicology, Studies in Classics, Volume 9, published by Psychology Press, 2004, 176 pages, ISBN 0-203-49104-1 (978-0-203-49104-1). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Description: Aristoxenus made an enormous contribution to the development of music theory in antiquity. Despite his Pythagorean upbringing, he rejected Pythagorean methods of harmonics which focused on the mathematical significance of musical structures and instead applied a scientific methodology appropriated from Aristotle. This volume studies the theories of Aristoxenus.

[Gifford 1940] E. W. Gifford. Culture Element Distributions: XII - Apache-Pueblo, Anthropological Records, Volume 4, Number 1, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, May 18, 1940, pages 1–208. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Giglio 1994] Virginia Giglio. Southern Cheyenne Women's Songs, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1994, 272 pages, ISBN 0-8061-2605-1 (978-0-8061-2605-0), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gil 2010] E. Gil, M. Orini, R. Bailón, J. M. Vergara, L. Mainardi, and P. Laguna. “Photoplethysmography Pulse Rate Variability as a Surrogate Measurement of Heart Rate Variability During Non-stationary Conditions”, Physiological Measurement, Volume 31, 2010, pages 1271–1290, doi:10.1088/0967-3334/31/9/015. Publication 20702919 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: In this paper we assessed the possibility of using the pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from the photoplethysmography signal as an alternativemeasurement of the HRV signal in non-stationary conditions. The study is based on analysis of the changes observed during a tilt table test in the heart rate modulation of 17 young subjects. First, the classical indices of HRV analysis were compared to the indices from PRV in intervals where stationarity was assumed. Second, the time-varying spectral properties of both signals were compared by timefrequency (TF) and TF coherence analysis. Third, the effect of replacing PRV with HRV in the assessment of the changes of the autonomic modulation of the heart rate was considered. Time-invariant HRV and PRV indices showed no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) and high correlation (> 0.97). Time-frequency analysis revealed that the TF spectra of both signals were highly correlated (0.99 ± 0.01); the difference between the instantaneous power, in the LF and HF bands, obtained from HRV and PRV was small (< 10−3 s−2) and their temporal patterns were highly correlated (0.98 ± 0.04 and 0.95 ± 0.06 in the LF and HF bands, respectively) and TF coherence in the LF and HF bands was high (0.97 ± 0.04 and 0.89 ± 0.08, respectively). Finally, the instantaneous power in the LF band was observed to significantly increase during head-up tilt by both HRV and PRV analysis. These results suggest that although some differences in the time-varying spectral indices extracted from HRV and PRV exist, mainly in the HF band associated with respiration, PRV could be used as a surrogate of HRV during non-stationary conditions, at least during the tilt table test.

[Gilbert 1998] T. B. Gilbert. “Breathing Difficulties in Wind Instrument Players”, Maryland Medical Journal, Volume 47, Number 1, January 1998. Publication 9448412 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

Abstract: Performance of a wind instrument requires appreciable lung volume and diaphragmatic mechanical force, skilled breath control, adequate patency and humidity of air passages, and precise coordination of the oropharyngeal cavity. Depending on the instrument class, variable rates of air flow, pressure, and duration are necessary to produce optimal tone quality. Wind players may be seriously impaired by respiratory diseases that, comparatively, might appear trivial to the nonperformer. The workplace environment should be assessed for occupational hazards when managing these patients, and smoking should be particularly discouraged. Controversy exists implicating wind instrument use in the exacerbation of respiratory disease, including bronchial, laryngeal, pharyngeal, and oral anatomic changes – a result of the constant barotrauma of performance. Asthma is the most common chronic pulmonary disorder among wind players, and therapeutic programs that include breath training and physical exercise improve symptoms, endurance, and general well-being.

[Gilbert-HFB 1912] Henry Franklin Belknap Gilbert (1866–1928). Indian Scenes — Five Pieces for the Pianoforte, published by H. W. Gray Co., New York, 1912. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gilbert-WH 1942] William Harlen Gilbert, Jr. “The Eastern Cherokees”, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 133, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1942, pages 169–414 + plates. Anthropological paper number 23. Publication bulletin1331943smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Giles 1984] Martha Mead Giles. “Improvising on an Indian Flute”, Music Educators Journal, Volume 70, Number 6, February 1984, pages 61–62, doi:10.2307/3400798. Publication 3400798 on JSTOR (subscription access). See the Entry on the ERIC web portal Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it.

[Gill 2009] Kamraan Z. Gill and Dale Purves. “A Biological Rationale for Musical Scales”, PLoS ONE, Volume 4, Number 12, e8144, December 3, 2009, 9 pages, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008144 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Scales are collections of tones that divide octaves into specific intervals used to create music. Since humans can distinguish about 240 different pitches over an octave in the mid-range of hearing, in principle a very large number of tone combinations could have been used for this purpose. Nonetheless, compositions in Western classical, folk and popular music as well as in many other musical traditions are based on a relatively small number of scales that typically comprise only five to seven tones. Why humans employ only a few of the enormous number of possible tone combinations to create music is not known. Here we show that the component intervals of the most widely used scales throughout history and across cultures are those with the greatest overall spectral similarity to a harmonic series. These findings suggest that humans prefer tone combinations that reflect the spectral characteristics of conspecific vocalizations. The analysis also highlights the spectral similarity among the scales used by different cultures.

[Gillessen 2002] Klaus Gillessen. “Simple Reed-Pipes from Crete and Turkey”, The Galpin Society Journal, Volume 55, published by the Galpin Society, April 2002, pages 379–381. Publication 4149061 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gilman 1891] Benjamin Ives Gilman (1852–1933). “Zuñi Melodies”, A Journal of American Ethnology and Archaeology, Volume 1, published by The Riverside Press, Massachusetts, 1891, pages 63–92. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gilman 1908] Benjamin Gilman. “Hopi Songs”, Hemenway Southwestern Archaeological Expedition, A Journal of American Ethnology and Archaeology, Volume 5, published by The Riverside Press, Massachusetts, 1908, 235 pages. Contains 18 songs. Hopi Songs Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Nakai Tablature for the Native American Flute

Description of the 2006 Kessinger Publishing edition: In 1891, the Hemenway Southwestern Expedition, sponsored since 1886 by wealthy Bostonian Mary Hemenway, moved to the Hopi villages in Arizona, where among the objects collected were a large number of tecords of Hopi singing, the subject of this study.

[Gilman-EF 1993] Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson. Acer negundo Boxelder, Fact Sheet ST-20, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, November 1993, 4 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

[Gilmore 1919] Melvin Randolph Gilmore (1868–1940). “Uses of Plants by the Indians of the Missouri River Region”, Thirty-third Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1911-1912, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1919, pages 43–154 + plates 1–30a, retrieved March 15, 2010. Publication annualreportofbu33smithso on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Gilreath 2011] Amy Gilreath. Gypsum Cave, January 4, 2011, retrieved April 21, 2012. Gypsum Cave Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gioia 2006] Ted Gioia. Healing Songs, published by Duke University Press, Durham, North Carolina, 2006, 264 pages, ISBN 0-8223-3702-9 (978-0-8223-3702-7). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Giorgi 1897] Carlo T. Giorgi. “Flute”, United States Patent 594,735, Granted November 30, 1897, 4 pages, retrieved December 5, 2009. Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Patents and Patent Applications Related to Flute Construction

[Giroux 1953] Paul H. Giroux. “The History of the Flute and Its Music in the United States”, Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 1953, pages 68–73. Publication 3344568 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goble 1992] Paul Goble. Love Flute, published by Aladdin Paperbacks, Simon & Shuster, New York, 1992, ISBN 0-689-81683-9. for ages 5-8. See the Aladdin web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

Description on cover: In love with a beautiful girl, but too shy to tell her, a young man leaves his camp in frustration. One night he receives mystical visitors who offer him a special gift - a love flute. A gift from the birds and animals, it tells the girl of is love where words had failed.

[Goebel 1995] George H. Goebel. “New Evidence on the Echo Flute”, The Galpin Society Journal, Volume 48, March 1995, pages 205–207. Publication 842814 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goedicke 1971] Hans Goedicke (editor). Near Eastern Studies in Honor of William Foxwell Albright, published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, in German and English, 1971, 503 pages, ISBN 0-8018-1235-6 (978-0-8018-1235-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goldberger 1988] Ary L. Goldberger, D. R. Rigney, J. Mietus, E. M. Antman, and S. Greenwald. “Nonlinear Dynamics in Sudden Cardiac Death Syndrome: Heartrate Oscillations and Bifurcations”, Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, Volume 44, Number 11–12, December 1, 1988, pages 983–987, doi:10.1007/BF01939894 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death show evidence of nonlinear heartrate dynamics, including abrupt spectral changes (bifurcations) and sustained low frequency (.01–.04 Hz) oscillations in heartrate.

[Goldberger 1991] Ary L. Goldberger. “Is the Normal Heartbeat Chaotic or Homeostatic?”, News in Physiological Science, Volume 6, April 1991, pages 87–91. Publication 11537649 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Limits to the usefulness of homeostasis as a guiding physiological principle are revealed by new mechanisms derived from study of nonlinear systems that generate a type of variability called chaos. Loss of complex physiological variability may occur in certain pathological conditions including heart rate dynamics before sudden death and with aging.

[Gombert 1994] Greg Gombert. A Guide to Native American Music Recordings, published by Multi Cultural Publishing, Fort Collins, Colorado, 1994, ix + 134 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gomez 2007] M. Arias Gomez. “Música y Neurología «Music and Neurology»”, Neurologia, Volume 22, Number 1, in Spanish, January–February 2007, pages 39–45. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Music perception and output are special functions of the human brain. Investigation in this field is growing with the support of modern neuroimaging techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography). Interest in the music phenomenon and the disorders regarding its processing has been limited. Music is not just an artistic activity but a language to communicate, evoke and reinforce several emotions. Although the subject is still under debate, processing of music is independent of common language and each one uses independent circuits. One may be seriously affected and the other practically unharmed. On the other hand, there may be separate channels within the processing of music for the temporary elements (rhythm), melodic elements (pitch, timbre, and melody), memory and emotional response. The study of subjects with absolute pitch, congenital and acquired amusias, musicogenic epilepsy and musical hallucinations has greatly contributed to the knowledge of how the brain processes music. Music training involves some changes in morphology and physiology of professional musicians' brains. Stress, chronic pain and professional dystonias constitute a special field of musicians' disturbances that concerns neurological practice. Listening to and playing music may have some educational and therapeutic benefits.

[Goncharova 2003] I. I. Goncharova, D. J. McFarland, T. M., Vaughan, and J. R. Wolpaw. “EMG Contamination of EEG: Spectral and Topographical Characteristics”, Clinical Neurophysiology,, Volume 114, Number 9, 2003, pages 1580–1593, doi:10.1016/S1388-2457(03)00093-2 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract:
Objective: Electromyogram (EMG) contamination is often a problem in electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, particularly, for those applications such as EEG-based brain–computer interfaces that rely on automated measurements of EEG features. As an essential prelude to developing methods for recognizing and eliminating EMG contamination of EEG, this study defines the spectral and topographical characteristics of frontalis and temporalis muscle EMG over the entire scalp. It describes both average data and the range of individual differences.
Methods: In 25 healthy adults, signals from 64 scalp and 4 facial locations were recorded during relaxation and during defined (15, 30, or 70% of maximum) contractions of frontalis or temporalis muscles.
Results: In the average data, EMG had a broad frequency distribution from 0 to .200 Hz. Amplitude was greatest at 20–30 Hz frontally and 40–80 Hz temporally. Temporalis spectra also showed a smaller peak around 20 Hz. These spectral components attenuated and broadened centrally. Even with weak (15%) contraction, EMG was detectable ðP , 0:001Þ near the vertex at frequencies .12 Hz in the average data and .8 Hz in some individuals.
Conclusions: Frontalis or temporalis muscle EMG recorded from the scalp has spectral and topographical features that vary substantially across individuals. EMG spectra often have peaks in the beta frequency range that resemble EEG beta peaks.
Significance: While EMG contamination is greatest at the periphery of the scalp near the active muscles, even weak contractions can produce EMG that obscures or mimics EEG alpha, mu, or beta rhythms over the entire scalp. Recognition and elimination of this contamination is likely to require recording from an appropriate set of peripheral scalp locations.

[Gong 2006] Hong-yu Gong. Missionaries, Reformers, and the Beginnings of Western Music in Late Imperial China (1839–1911), Doctoral Dissertation in Asian Studies – University of Auckland, University of Auckland, 2006, 421 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This is a study of Christian missionaries, Chinese reformers and the beginnings of Western music in late imperial China (1842-1911). It focuses on examining how Christian missionaries and Chinese reformers, in the process of advancing their goals, made use of aspects of Western musical culture and how their actions helped facilitate the introduction of Western music to a wider Chinese audience in the late Qing. The purpose of this study is to show that the introduction of Western music in China was essentially a by-product of Christian evangelism and Chinese reformism.

The central contention of the thesis is that Western music was introduced to the Chinese not for its aesthetic appeal or artistic superiority but for its utility in China’s conversion to God and in its struggle for modernity.

This study is constructed upon empirical evidence chiefly from primary sources and from citations in Chinese and Western scholarship. It makes use of written accounts such as diaries, letters, memoirs, newspaper and magazine materials, religious tracts, sermons, and visual representations of musical activity in contemporaneous paintings, photos, drawings and prints.

The thesis is divided into two main parts. The first part, comprising Chapters 1 to 4, investigates the uses of music in Christian missions in China and the role of missionaries in the introduction and gradual spread of Western music in China. The second part, consisting of Chapters 5 to 9, deals with the role of Chinese reformers and that of Japan in the wide dissemination of Western music at the turn of the twentieth century. The Conclusion recapitulates some of the findings from the nine chapters and restates the general argument of this thesis. It also offers some reflections on the broad significance of the role of the missionaries and Chinese reformers in the forming of a new musical tradition in China.

[Goodheart 2002] Adam Goodheart. “Commedia dell'Arte”, Conde Nast Traveler, December 2002. Commedia dell'Arte Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gooding 1998] Erik D. Gooding. “Songs of the People: Plains Indian Music and Recordings, 1968-1996”, Music Library Association Notes - Second Series, Volume 55, Number 1, September 1998, pages 37–67. Publication 900346 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goodman 1977] Linda Goodman. Music and Dance in Northwest Coast Indian Life, published by the Navajo Community College Press, Tsaile, Arizona, 1977, 249 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goodwin 1952] A. J. H. Goodwin. “Jan van Riebeeck and the Hottentots 1652-1662”, The South African Archaeological Bulletin, Volume 7, Number 25, March 1952, pages 2–6. Publication 3887530 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goosman 1990] Jack P. Goosman. “Flute Headjoint”, United States Patent 4,896,579, Granted January 30, 1990, 7 pages, retrieved December 5, 2009. Flute Headjoint Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Patents and Patent Applications Related to Flute Construction

[Goranson 2011] Casey Goranson. Hurrian Hymn No. 6, 2011, retrieved March 20, 2011. Hurrian Hymn No. 6 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goss 2006] Clint Goss (born 1957) and Eric Miller. SpiritGrass, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-061, 12 tracks, 2006, UPC 8-37101-22955-5, audio CD. See the SpiritGrass Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goss 2008] Clint Goss. Jam Tracks in A Minor, Native Flute Tracks series, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-NT01, 20 tracks, February 19, 2008, total time 79:08, UPC 7-96873-02719-9, audio CD. See the Native Flute Tracks Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Getting Out of a RUT on the Native American Flute

[Goss 2008a] Clint Goss. Jam Tracks in G Minor, Native Flute Tracks series, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-NT02, 20 tracks, December 9, 2008, total time 77:11, UPC 8-84501-08018-7, audio CD. See the Native Flute Tracks Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Getting Out of a RUT on the Native American Flute

[Goss 2009] Clint Goss. Jam Tracks in F# Minor, Native Flute Tracks series, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-NT03, 24 tracks, August 11, 2009, total time 79:43, UPC 8-84501-17450-3, audio CD. See the Native Flute Tracks Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Getting Out of a RUT on the Native American Flute

[Goss 2009a] Clint Goss. Jam Tracks in E Minor, Native Flute Tracks series, Westport, Connecticut, Manifest Spirit Records, MSR-NT04, 21 tracks, December 8, 2009, total time 76:57, UPC 8-84501-23951-6, audio CD. See the Native Flute Tracks Web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Getting Out of a RUT on the Native American Flute

[Goss 2012] Clint Goss. “Lessons on Lessons”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2012, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2012, pages 13–15. See the INAFA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goss 2013] Clinton F. Goss. “Intraoral Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments”, August 21, 2013, 16 pages, arXiv:1308.5214. Intraoral Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Flutopedia Revision History, Breath Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments (2), Your Brain on Flute

Abstract: High intraoral pressure generated when playing some wind instruments has been linked to a variety of health issues. Prior research has focused on Western classical instruments, but no work has been published on ethnic wind instruments. This study measured intraoral pressure when playing six classes of ethnic wind instruments (N = 149): Native American flutes (n = 71) and smaller samples of ethnic duct flutes, reed instruments, reedpipes, overtone whistles, and overtone flutes. Results are presented in the context of a survey of prior studies, providing a composite view of the intraoral pressure requirements of a broad range of wind instruments. Mean intraoral pressure was 8.37 mBar across all ethic wind instruments and 5.21 ± 2.16 mBar for Native American flutes. The range of pressure in Native American flutes closely matches pressure reported in other studies for normal speech, and the maximum intraoral pressure, 20.55 mBar, is below the highest subglottal pressure reported in other studies during singing. Results show that ethnic wind instruments, with the exception of ethnic reed instruments, have generally lower intraoral pressure requirements than Western classical wind instruments. This implies a lower risk of the health issues related to high intraoral pressure.

[Goss 2013a] Clinton F. Goss and Eric B. Miller. “Dynamic Metrics of Heart Rate Variability”, August 29, 2013, 4 pages, arXiv:1308.6018. Dynamic Metrics of Heart Rate Variability Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Your Brain on Flute

Abstract: Numerous metrics of heart rate variability (HRV) have been described, analyzed, and compared in the literature. However, they rarely cover the actual metrics used in a class of HRV data acquisition devices – those designed primarily to produce real-time metrics. This paper characterizes a class of metrics that we term dynamic metrics. We also report the results of a pilot study which compares one such dynamic metric, based on photoplethysmographic data using a moving sampling window set to the length of an estimated breath cycle (EBC), with established HRV metrics. The results show high correlation coefficients between the dynamic EBC metrics and the established static SDNN metric (standard deviation of Normal-to-Normal) based on electrocardiography. These results demonstrate the usefulness of data acquisition devices designed for real-time metrics.

[Goss 2014] Clint Goss and Eric B. Miller. Flute Playing Physiology — A Collection of Papers on the Physiological Effects of the Native American Flute, June 6, 2014, 54 pages, 10.13140/2.1.4064.0643. Flute Playing Physiology Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Your Brain on Flute

Summary: This collection of five papers reflects various aspects of research done on the physiological effects of the Native American flute. Versions of each of these papers have been published elsewhere.

[Goss-WP 1992] W. P. Goss and R. G. Miller. “Thermal Properties of Wood and Wood Products”, Proceedings of the Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Whole Buildings International Conference, 1992, Paper 28, 1992, 12 pages, ISBN 0-910110-93-X. Thermal Properties of Wood and Wood Products Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

Abstract: This paper presents the methods used to arrive at the revised thermal properties of wood included in Table 4, Chapter 22, 1989 ASHRAE Handbook-Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1989). The procedures used to determine the specific heat, range of densities, and range of thermal conductivities of wood species generally used in building construction are presented. The rationale was to use the wood thermal property data available in publications (handbooks, journals, transactions, proceedings), from wood associations, and from new experimental data to determine the thermal properties of wood species not listed in previous editions of the Handbook. The moisture content is assumed to be 12%, which is considered the average for woods in service in buildings in the United States. This tends to give somewhat conservative values for the thermal resistance of wood but is probably more realistic than the two wood thermal resistances that appeared in the 1981 Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1981). The paper also documents the changes made in the building board section of the 1989 Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1989) and repm ts a set of test results for oven-dried waferboard.

[Goswami 2011] Damodar Prasad Goswami, Dewaki Nandan Tibarewala, and Dilip Kumar Bhattacharya. “Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Signal in Meditation Using Second-order Difference Plot”, Journal of Applied Physics, Volume 109, Number 114703, 2011, 6 pages, doi:10.1063/1.3586270 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: In this article, the heart rate variability signal taken from subjects practising different types of meditations have been investigated to find the underlying similarity among them and how they differ from the non-meditative condition. Four different groups of subjects having different meditation techniques are involved. The data have been obtained from the Physionet and also collected with our own ECG machine. For data analysis, the second order difference plot is applied. Each of the plots obtained from the second order differences form a single cluster which is nearly elliptical in shape except for some outliers. In meditation, the axis of the elliptical cluster rotates anticlockwise from the cluster formed from the premeditation data, although the amount of rotation is not of the same extent in every case. This form study reveals definite and specific changes in the heart rate variability of the subjects during meditation. All the four groups of subjects followed different procedures but surprisingly the resulting physiological effect is the same to some extent. It indicates that there is some commonness among all the meditative techniques in spite of their apparent dissimilarity and it may be hoped that each of them leads to the same result as preached by the masters of meditation. The study shows that meditative state has a completely different physiology and that it can be achieved by any meditation technique we have observed. Possible use of this tool in clinical setting such as in stress management and in the treatment of hypertension is also mentioned.

[Grammatopoulos 2009] Ektor Grammatopoulos. A Study of the Effects of Playing a Wind Instrument on the Occlusion, M.Phil. Dissertation – Department of Orthodontics, The Dental School, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, December 2009, 145 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract:
Objectives: To investigate the effects of playing a wind instrument on the occlusion.
Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional observational study. One hundred and seventy professional musicians were selected from twenty-one classical orchestras and organisations. The subjects were subdivided according to the type of instrument mouthpiece and included thirty-two large cup-shaped mouthpiece brass players (group A.L), forty-two small cupshaped mouthpiece brass players (group A.S), thirty-seven single reed mouthpiece woodwind players (group B) and fifty-nine string and percussion instrument players (control group). Impressions were taken for each subject and various parameters were assessed from the study casts. Statistical analysis was undertaken for interval variables with one-way analysis of variance and for categorical variables with Chi-square tests.
Results: No statistically significant differences were found in overjet, overbite, crowding, Little’s Irregularity Index and prevalence of incisor classification between the wind instrument players and the control group, p>0.05. However, group A.L had a significantly higher prevalence of buccal crossbites than all the other groups, p<0.05.
Conclusions: Playing a wind instrument does not significantly influence the position of the anterior teeth and is not a major aetiological factor in the development of malocclusion. However, playing a brass instrument with a large cup-shaped mouthpiece may predispose to buccal crossbite development.

[Grantham 2002] Bill Grantham. Creation Myths and Legends of the Creek Indians, published by the University Press of Florida, 15 Northwest 15th Street, Gainsville, FL 32611-2079, 2002, ISBN 0-8130-2451-X. See the University Press of Florida web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Grauer 2006] Victor A. Grauer. “Echoes of Our Forgotten Ancestors”, The World of Music, Volume 48, Number 2, 2006, pages 5–58. Publication 41699695 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Grauer 2007] Victor A. Grauer. “New Perspectives on the Kalahari Debate: A Tale of Two ‘Genomes’”, Before Farming, Article 4, February 2007, 14 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: While the ‘Great Kalahari Debate’ hinged almost exclusively on the interpretation of sparse and confusing archaeological and historical data, abundant and convincing genetic evidence from the realm of biological anthropology has been largely ignored, while equally compelling cultural evidence drawn from the musical traditions of the populations in question has been overlooked entirely. In this paper, I attempt to demonstrate how genetic and musicological research can be combined to provide a compelling case for the ‘traditionalist’ position in this ongoing controversy. To this end, I draw upon an important but little known musical ‘genome’, the Cantometric database, compiled under the direction of the late Alan Lomax, at the Columbia University Bureau of Applied Social Research.

[Grauer 2011] Victor A. Grauer. Sounding the Depths: Tradition and the Voices of History, published by CreateSpace, 2011, 314 pages, ISBN 1-4637-4175-8 (978-1-4637-4175-4). See the Sounding the Depths web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gray 1985] Judith A. Gray and Dorothy Sara Lee (editors). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 2: Northeastern Indian Catalog and Southeastern Indian Catalog, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 421 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

32 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (16), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (16)

Abstract: Two catalogs inventory field-recorded wax cylinders which document the music and language of Indian tribes in northeastern and southeastern United States from 1890-1930. The Northeastern Indian Catalog contains entries for 738 cylinders comprising 16 music and spoken word collections from the Chippewa, Fox, Iroquois, Kickapoo, Menominee, Passamaquoddy, Sauk, Shawnee, and Winnebago. The Southeastern Indian Catalog contains entries for 268 cylinders comprising 6 music and spoken word collections from the Alabama, Catawba, Cherokee, Chitimacha, Choctaw, and Seminole. Each catalog has its own introductory chapter and is divided into alphabetically arranged segments representing individual tribes or culture groups; cylinders in each segment are listed alphabetically by collector or collection. Introductions to each segment summarize basic information of scope, recording locations and dates, institutional affiliations, collectors, and collection characteristics. Bibliographies list published and unpublished materials. Catalog entries refer to individual cylinders and contain cylinder number, Archive of Folk Culture number, number assigned by collector, duration and quality of cylinder, collector's description of contents, performer, recording location and date, and notes containing technical information about sound quality, textual clarification, and genre classification. Maps show sites of field recordings. Photographs of collectors and performers appear throughout. Concordances accompany two large collection segments. (LFL)

[Gray 1988] Judith A. Gray (editor). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 3: Great Basin/Plateau Indian Catalog, Northwest Coast/Arctic Indian Catalog, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1988, 300 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Two catalogs inventory wax cylinder collections, field recorded among Native American groups, 1890-1942. The catalog for Great Basin and Plateau Indian tribes contains entries for 174 cylinders in 7 collections from the Flathead, Nez Perce, Thompson/Okanagon, Northern Ute, and Yakima tribes. The catalog for Northwest Coast and Arctic Indian tribes contains entries for 498 cylinders in 20 collections from the Carrier, Clackamas Chinook, Clayoquot, Mainland Comox, Polar Eskimos, Halkomelem, Ingalik, Kalapuya, Kwakiutl, Makah, Nitinat, Nootka, Quileute, Shasta, Squamish, Tlingit, Tsimshian, Tututni, and Upper Umpqua. Collectors include Frances Densmore, Leo Joachim Frachtenberg, and 10 others. Catalog introductions provide information about the collectors and their aims, the circumstances of recording expeditions, and aspects of classification. Collection introductions summarize basic information about scope, organization, recording locations and dates, institutional affiliations, and collectors. Individual entries include cylinder number, Archive of Folk Culture number, number assigned by collector, duration and quality of recording, collector's description of contents, performer, location and date of recording, and technical notes. Selected bibliographies contain published and unpublished materials: 34 references for the first catalog; 70 references for the second catalog. Maps show sites of field recordings. (SV)

[Gray 1990] Judith A. Gray and Edwin J. Schupman, Jr. (editors). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 5: California Indian Catalog, Middle and South American Indian Catalog, Southwestern Indian Catalog-1, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 5, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 528 pages, ISBN 0-8444-0677-5 (978-0-8444-0677-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

22 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (10), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (10)

[Gray 1996] Judith A. Gray. “Returning Music to the Makers: The Library of Congress, American Indians, and the Federal Cylinder Project”, Cultural Survival Quarterly, Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 1996. Returning Music to the Makers Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings (3)

Lead paragraph: The United States Library of Congress houses the country's largest collection of early recordings of American Indian music, recorded originally on wax cylinders and today also preserved on high quality audio tape. The Archive of Folk Culture now includes approximately 10,000 cylinder recordings from private individuals and from other agencies of the U.S. government. Especially important among the latter were the materials assembled by the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology. Of the 10,000 cylinders, nearly 8,000 document the sung and spoken traditions of American Indian communities. Among them were the earliest known field recordings - Passamaquoddy songs and narratives by Noel Josephs and Peter Selmore, recorded by Jesse Walter Fewkes in Calais, Maine, in March 1890. They had been transferred to the Library by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University.

[Green 1999] Rayna Green and Melanie Fernandez. The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, 1999. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Green-J 1908] Janet M. Green and Josephine Thrall. The American History and Encyclopedia of Music, Volume 2, published by Irving Square, Toledo, Ohio, 1908. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Greene 1932] Evarts B. Greene and Virginia D. Harrington. American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790, published by the Columbia University Press, New York, 1932, xxiii + 228 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Greene-PD 2003] Paul D. Greene. “Ordering a Sacred Terrain: Melodic Pathways of Himalayan Flute Pilgrimage”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 47, Number 2, Spring–Summer 2003, pages 205–227. Publication 3113918 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Greenfield-CD 1995] Carol D. Greenfield. The Fifer's Delightful Companion — A Book of Harmony Parts to Complement The Fifer's Delight, Second Edition, April 1995, 86 pages, comb binding. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Greenman 1935] Emerson F. Greenman (1895–1973). “Excavations of the Reeve Village Site, Lake County, Ohio”, Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Volume 44, Number 1, 1935, pages 2–64. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Greenman 1937] Emerson F. Greenman. “Two Prehistoric Villages Near Cleveland, Ohio”, Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Volume 46, Number 4, 1937, pages 305–366. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Greer 2008] Jill D. Greer. “The Otoe-Missouria Flag Song”, Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 30, 2008, pages 98–105. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The focus of this paper is upon a single important song within the Otoe-Missouria tribe. This is a preliminary sketch, or a truly working paper as the KU publication series denotes. In subject and approach, it has been inspired by the venerable tradition of collecting, preserving, and analyzing Native American texts begun with 19th century BAE ethnographers such as James Owen Dorsey, encouraged by Franz Boas and his Americanist students, and celebrated by more recent scholars of verbal art as Hymes, Tedlock, Sherzer, and Basso. The particular esthetic principles used in the text will link it clearly to other tribal songs, and to the performance context as well. I will also raise issues of cultural change and continuity in the context of language shift, and finally, I argue that this Flag Song compellingly demonstrates the value of maintaining a heritage language within endangered and obsolescent language communities.

[Greer-J 2009] John Greer and Mavis Greer. “Rock Art and Other Archaeological Cave Use on the North American Plains from Canada to Northern Mexico”, Fifteenth International Congress on Speleology, Proceedings, Volume 1, Symposia Part 1, published by the International Union of Speleology, 2009, pages 90–96, ISBN-13 978-1-879961-33-3 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Rock art associated with caves is mostly pictographs (painted figures) although petroglyphs (engraved figures) occur in some entrance areas. Other kinds of cultural debris found in caves includes house remains, butchered bones, ocher mining, cold food storage, cultural deposits, log structures, human remains, stone and dirt platforms, placed objects and animal remains, and other items discarded from ritual. Natural light zones are divided into categories based on available light and personal orientation: Daylight, Twilight, Transitional Dark, and Dark zones. Rock art occurs in all zones, while other archeological manifestations mostly occur in Daylight to initial Transitional Dark zone settings. Rock art setting and position of other materials are generally evaluated relative to public and private use, or positions, although reevaluation of that distinction suggests the situation is more complex, and almost all rock art placement could be considered public in some sense. Most cultural materials in caves within the middle of the continent seem to date from the last 3500 years, with most in the last 1000 years. Implied function includes occupation in a protected setting, ritual activity, refuge areas for escape and hiding, ritual deposition of objects and animal remains, and disposal of the dead. Ease of reaching the desired location in the cave is highly variable, with open entrance areas easily accessed and other locations severely isolated by passage restrictions and complex navigation. Cave use throughout the region, as elsewhere, is part of generalized human activity and is not limited to particular cultural groups.

[Gregg 1986] Michael L. Gregg. An Overview of the Prehistory of Western and Central North Dakota: Class I Cultural Resources Inventory, Dickinson District, Bureau of Land Management, February 1984, 1986. Publication overviewofprehis00greg on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Greschak 2003] John Greschak. The OZ Pitch-Naming Convention, January 23, 2003, retrieved July 13, 2010. See the OZ Pitch Naming Convention article. The OZ Pitch-Naming Convention Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Second Register

[Griffith 1910] D. W. {David Llewelyn Wark} Griffith (1875–1948) (director); F. W. Bitzer (camera); Mary Pickford, Dark Cloud, and Dell Henderson (performers). The Song of the Wildwood Flute, Paper Print Collection, collection of the, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division of the Library of Congress, FLA 5709, produced by Biograph, 1910. 1 reel, 346 feet, 16mm, reference print. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Summary: After hearing him play the flute, Dove Eyes chooses to marry Gray Cloud rather than another Indian suitor. When Gray Cloud falls into a bear pit, his rival leaves him there until he sees the maiden's suffering and rescues him. (MH)

[Grocke 2006] Denise Grocke. "Music is a Moral Law" — A Quotation from Plato?, Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 2006, retrieved November 26, 2010. See the Paper on the Voices web site. "Music is a Moral Law" Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Readings and Quotations on Music

[Groenewald 2008] Liesbeth Hendrika Groenewald. Bushman Imagery and its Impact on the Visual Constructs of Pippa Skotnes, Master in Visual Art – University of South Africa, November 2008, 108 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Groeschel 1988] Gene Groeschel. Hawk Eyes Dreaming, Wild Wing, 501, 1988, ASIN B00006JUIU, Audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's Description: Naturalist Gene Groeschel began his study of songbirds and Native American music in New Mexico. A photographer and parachutist, his initial published work presented a skydiver's view of human flight in free fall. Later focus on birds led to international publication. Hearing Native American music at powwows, Gene began studying the Comanche, Aztecan double and Mayan turtle flutes. The Corrales Adobe Theatre in New Mexico was the site of his 1985 premiere performance of original flute music coupled with his wilderness photography. He then began blending his flute music with his wild songbird recordings. This blending is Hawk Eyes Dreaming, presenting a unique and provocative spiritual combination of earth, man and sky.

[Groneberg 2003] Brigitte Groneberg. “Searching for Akkadian Lyrics: From Old Babylonian to the "Liederkatalog" KAR 158”, Journal of Cuneiform Studies, Volume 55, published by The American Schools of Oriental Research, 2003, pages 55–74. Publication 3515954 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Gruber 2004] Claudia Gruber. Möbeldekor aus Elfenbein Zur Rekonstruktion von Schnitzverzierungen an altorientalischen Möbeln, Doctoral dissertation – Fakultät für Kulturwissenschaften der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany, in German, 2004, 399 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gruhn 2006] Ruth Gruhn. “Paleoamericans in Peru”, Mammoth Trumpet, Volume 21, Number 4, September 2006, pages 10–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gruhn 2007] Ruth Gruhn. “The Earliest Reported Archaeological Sites in South America”, Mammoth Trumpet, Volume 22, Number 1, January 2007, pages 14–18. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gruzelier 2005] John Gruzelier and Tobias Egner. “Critical Validation Studies of Neurofeedback”, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Volume 14, 2005, pages 83–104, doi:10.1016/j.chc.2004.07.002. Publication 15564053 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The field of neurofeedback training has proceeded largely without validation. In this article the authors review studies directed at validating sensory motor rhythm, beta and alpha-theta protocols for improving attention, memory, and music performance in healthy participants. Importantly, benefits were demonstrable with cognitive and neurophysiologic measures that were predicted on the basis of regression models of learning to enhance sensory motor rhythm and beta activity. The first evidence of operant control over the alpha-theta ratio is provided, together with remarkable improvements in artistic aspects of music performance equivalent to two class grades in conservatory students. These are initial steps in providing a much needed scientific basis to neurofeedback.

[Gruzelier 2009] John Gruzelier. “A Theory of Alpha/Theta Neurofeedback, Creative Performance Enhancement, Long Distance Functional Connectivity and Psychological Integration”, Cognitive Processes, Volume 10, Supplement 1, February 2009, pages S101–S109, doi:10.1007/s10339-008-0248-5. Publication 19082646 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Professionally significant enhancement of music and dance performance and mood has followed training with an EEG-neurofeedback protocol which increases the ratio of theta to alpha waves using auditory feedback with eyes closed. While originally the protocol was designed to induce hypnogogia, a state historically associated with creativity, the outcome was psychological integration, while subsequent applications focusing on raising the theta-alpha ratio, reduced depression and anxiety in alcoholism and resolved post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). In optimal performance studies we confirmed associations with creativity in musical performance, but effects also included technique and communication. We extended efficacy to dance and social anxiety. Diversity of outcome has a counterpart in wide ranging associations between theta oscillations and behaviour in cognitive and affective neuroscience: in animals with sensory-motor activity in exploration, effort, working memory, learning, retention and REM sleep; in man with meditative concentration, reduced anxiety and sympathetic autonomic activation, as well as task demands in virtual spatial navigation, focussed and sustained attention, working and recognition memory, and having implications for synaptic plasticity and long term potentiation. Neuroanatomical circuitry involves the ascending mescencephalic-cortical arousal system, and limbic circuits subserving cognitive as well as affective/motivational functions. Working memory and meditative bliss, representing cognitive and affective domains, respectively, involve coupling between frontal and posterior cortices, exemplify a role for theta and alpha waves in mediating the interaction between distal and widely distributed connections. It is posited that this mediation in part underpins the integrational attributes of alpha-theta training in optimal performance and psychotherapy, creative associations in hypnogogia, and enhancement of technical, communication and artistic domains of performance in the arts.

[GSU 2011] Georgia Southern University. Cherokee Online Dictionary, June 23, 2011, retrieved October 28, 2012. See the Cherokee Online Dictionary Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Gudrian 1995] Fred W. Gudrian. “An Examination of Late Woodland Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Morgan Site in Rocky Hill, Connecticut”, Bulletin of the Archaeological Society of Connecticut, Number 58, 1995, pages 13–29. An Examination of Late Woodland Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Morgan Site in Rocky Hill, Connecticut Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Guedon 1972] Marie-Françoise Guédon. “Canadian Indian Ethnomusicology: Selected Bibliography and Discography”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 16, Number 3 (Canadian Issue), published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, September 1972, pages 465–478. Publication 850204 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gumilla 1741] José Gumilla. El Orinoco Ilustrado: Historia Natural, Civil, y Geographica, de Este Gran Rio y de sus Caudalosas Vertientes «The Orinoco Ilustrated: Natural History, Civil, and Geography, of this Great River and its Mighty Banks», published by Manuel Fernandez, Madrid, Spain, in French and Spanish, 1741, 580 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gumilla 1758] José Gumilla. Historie Naturelle, Civile et Geographique de L'Orenoque, et des princípales Riviéres qui s'y jettent «Natural History, Civil and Geographical, of the Orinoco, and the Main Rivers Flowing Into (Volume One)», Tome Premier, published by Chez Jean Mossy Libraire, Canebiere, Spain, in French, 1758, 428 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gumilla 1791] José Gumilla. Historia Natural, Civil y Geografica de las Naciones Situadas en las Riveras del Rio Orinoco «Natural History, Civil and National Geographic, Located on the Orinoco Rivers (Volume 1)», Tomo I, published by Carlos Gilbert y Tutó, Barcelona, Spain, in Spanish, 1758, 398 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gunselman 2009] Cheryl Gunselman and Loran Olsen. The Nez Perce Music Archive, March 2009, 5 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The Nez Perce Music Archive consists of recordings of songs, as well as some speeches and legends, in various audio formats. These were originally recorded between 1897 and 1974. Loran Olsen, Music Professor at Washington State University from 1965 to 1993, gathered these recordings together from a variety of different sources and called this project the Nez Perce Music Archive. In cooperation with the Nez Perce Tribe, he has released several collections of these recordings for educational purposes, beginning in 1972. Each one of these, with a total of over 600 recordings in all, is a part of the Archive project.

[Gurney-OR 1968] O. R. Gurney (1911–2001). “An Old Babylonian Treatise on the Tuning of the Harp”, Iraq, Volume 30, Number 2, published by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, Autumn 1968, pages 229–233. Publication 4199853 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia (2)

[Gurney-OR 1974] O. R. Gurney. Middle Babylonian Legal Documents and Other Texts, Ur Excavation Texts (UET), Volume VII, published by British Museum Publications Ltd for the British Museum, and the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania, 1974, ISBN 0-7141-1082-5 (978-0-7141-1082-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia, Designations for Cuneiform and Ancient Mesopotamian Clay Tablets

[Gurney-OR 1994] O. R. Gurney. “A New Interpretation of the Nippur Music-Instruction Fragments”, Iraq, Volume 56, published by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, 1994, pages 101–106. Publication 4200387 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Gurney-OR 1994a] O. R. Gurney. “Babylonian Music Again”, Iraq, Volume 56, published by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, 1994, pages 101–106. Publication 4200387 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gurney-OR 1998] O. R. Gurney and M. L. West (born 1937). “Mesopotamian Tonal Systems: A Reply”, Iraq, Volume 60, published by the British Institute for the Study of Iraq, 1998, pages 223–227, doi:10.2307/4200460. Publication 4200460 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gustaver 1923] Bror Gustaver. “On a Peculiar Type of Whistle Found in Ancient American Indian Graves”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 25, Issue 3, published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., 1923, pages 307–317. See the American Anthropologist web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Guterbock 1970] H{ans} G{ustav} Güterbock. “Musical Notation in Ugarit”, Revue d’Assyriologie, Volume 64, published by Presses Universitaires de France, 1970, pages 45–52. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

 
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