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References - J

This page lists references with citation tags that begin with the letter J. For other references and a documentation on how these references are cited, see the main references page. You can also click on these direct links to the various pages:

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References - J

[Jackson 1917] J. Wilfrid Jackson. Shells as Evidence of the Migrations of Early Culture, published by The University Press and Longmans, Green & Co., Manchester and London, 1917, 216 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jackson-L 1885] Louis Jackson and T. S. Brown. Our Caughnawagas in Egypt: A Narrative of What was Seen and Accomplished by the Contingent of North American Indian Voyageurs who led the British Boat Expedition for the Relief of Khartoum up the Cataracts of the Nile, 1885, retrieved March 30, 2010. Publication ourcaughnawagasi00jackrich on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jackson-M 2010] Melissa S. Jackson. Bracketing the Age of the Great Gallery Rock Art Panel in Horseshoe Canyon, Utah by OSL Dating of Associated Alluvial Terraces, Paper 53, Undergraduate Honors Thesis – Utah State University, May 1, 2010, 50 pages. Bracketing the Age of the Great Gallery Rock Art Panel in Horseshoe Canyon, Utah by OSL Dating of Associated Alluvial Terraces Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Partial Abstract: Barrier Canyon Style rock art (BCS) is a unique rock art style indigenous to the middle Colorado Plateau that is of an unknown age and formed by a combination of wall preparation, rock pecking, and application of multiple pigments. It is characterized by broad-shouldered, mummy-like figures that commonly lack limbs and facial details but are accompanied by animated and realistic representations of animals. The age of BCS art remains unknown in spite of attempts to radiocarbon date accessory brush fibers in the mineral-based pigment. Yet a range of age hypotheses exist, from as young as 1600 AD to as old as the initial peopling of the continent, all based on stylistic comparisons to other rock art and figurines. This study attempts to constrain the age of BCS art by optically stimulated luminescence dating (OSL) alluvial terraces that have demonstrable cross-cutting stratigraphic relations to the type BCS rock art panel, the Great Gallery.

[Jackson-W 2004] Wayne Jackson. The Ras Shamra Discovery, published by Apologetics Press, Inc., Montgomery, Alabama, 2004. See the Apologetics web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia

[Jahnichen 2006] Gisa Jähnichen. “Sardinian Air in Lao Pipes”, Proceedings from the 16th International Meeting of the ICTM Study Group on Folk Musical Instruments, Tautosakos Darbai / Folklore Studies, Volume 32, 2006, pages 66–85. ISSN 1392–2831. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: World Flutes

Abstract: Subjectt: Migration of the Lao mouth organ khen into Europe and its use on Sardinia.

Purpose of Study: Analyzing conditions of migration of a unique musical instrument through colonial and religious contacts and the re-setting of playing techniques without further impact on their symbolic background in the country of its origin and of its destination.

[James 1830] Edwin James. A Narrative of the Captivity and Adventures of John Tanner — During Thirty Years Residence Among the Indians in the Interior of North America, published by Baldwin & Cradock, London, 1830, 426 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[James 1920] George Wharton James. New Mexico - The Land of the Delight Makers, published by The Page Company, Boston, 1920, 469 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jameson 1839] Anna Murphy Jameson. Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada, in Three Volumes, published by Wiley and Putnam, New York, 1839. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jameson 1907] J. Franklin Jameson (general editor). Spanish Explorers in the Southern United States 1528–1543, Original Narratives of Early American History series, published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1907, 411 pages, hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jaskowski 1981] Helen Jaskowski. “My Heart Will Go Out': Healing Songs of Native American Women”, International Journal of Women’s Studies, Volume 4, Number 2, 1981, pages 118–134. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jastrow 1906] Morris Jastrow, Jr. (1861–1921). “A Babylonian Parallel to the Story of Job”, Journal of Biblical Literature, Volume 25, Number 2, published by The Society of Biblical Literature, 1906, pages 135–191. Publication 3260156 on JSTOR (subscription access). A Babylonian Parallel to the Story of Job Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jastrow 1915] Morris Jastrow, Jr. The Civilization of Babylonia and Assyria — Its remains, language, history, religion, commerce, law, art, and literature, published by the J. B. Lippincott Co., 1915, 515 pages. Publication cu31924028554271 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Flutes of Gilgamesh and Ancient Mesopotamia (4)

[Jeancon 1923] Jean Allard Jeancon (1874–1936). Excavations in the Chama Valley, New Mexico, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 81, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1923, ix + 80 pages, 65 plates, 38 figures. Publication bulletin811923smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (3)

[Jeancon 1925] Jean Allard Jeancon. Indian Song Book, published by Denver Allied Arts, Denver, Colorado, 1925, iii + 25 pages, ASIN B001B21RJY, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jelsma 2000] Johan Jelsma. A Bed of Ochre: Mortuary Practices and Social Structure of a Maritime Archaic Indian Society at Port au Choix, Newfoundland «Een Bed van Oker. Grafgebruik en Socia Ie Structuur van een Indiaanse Samenleving te Port au Choix, Newfoundland, Canada (4220-4000 BP).», Doctoral dissertation – Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands, May 15, 2000, 332 pages, retrieved on April 6, 2011. See the dissertation on the University of Groningen web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: The L'Anse Amour Flute (2), The Development of Flutes in North America

Partial Abstract: Cemeteries are our most important source of information on the life ways of prehistoric people. Differences in mortuary practices can, to some extent, reflect social differences in a prehistoric society, and the study of human slteletal remains can provide information on the sex, age, trauma, genetic relationships, and diet.

This research is focussed on the ±4500-year-old Native American cemetery of Pon au Choix-3 locus 11. This site, which was excavated in 1967/68, was attributed to the Maritime Archaic culmre (Tuck 1976). At Port au Choix-3 locus II,93 well preserved human slteletons were discovered, which were buried in three spatially separate clusters. The burials contained many tools, ornaments and other grave goods made of, stone, bone and antler. Almost all individuals were lavishly covered with red ochre.
Translation: Grafvelden zijn de belangrijkste informatiebron van het leven van de prehistorische mens. VerschiJJen in begravingswijzen kunnen iets zeggen over sociale verschillen in een prehistorische maatschappij. De studie van menselijke botresten kan informatie geven over het geslacht, de leeftijd, trauma, genetische verwantschappen en dieet.

In dit onderzoek staat het ±4500 jaar oude Indiaanse grafveld van Port au Choix-3 locus II centra a!. Deze vindplaats, opgegraven in 1967/68, werd toegeschreven aan de Maritime Archaic cultuur (Tuck 1976). Te Port au Choix-3 locus II werden 93 goed geconserveerde skeletten ontdekt die waren verdeeld over drie ruimtelijk gescheiden clusters. De graven bevatten grote hoeveelheden gereedschappen, sieraden en andere bijgiften van, onder andere, steen, bot en gewei. De individuen waren bijna allen rijkelijk bedeeld m·et rode oker.

[Jenkins 2001] J. S. Jenkins. “The Mozart Effect”, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Volume 94, Number 4, April 2001, pages 170–172. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jenness-D 1928] Diamond Jenness. People of the Twilight, published by Macmillan, New York, 1928, 247 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jenness-SE 1991] Stuart E. Jenness. Arctic Odyssey: The Diary of Diamond Jenness, Ethnologist with the Canadian Arctic Expedition in Northern Alaska and Canada, 1913–1916, published by the Canadian Museum of Civilization, 1991, xiii + 839 pages, ISBN 0-660-12906-X (978-0-660-12906-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jensen-E 1997] Eric P. Jensen. Brain Compatible Strategies, published by Corwin, 1997. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jensen-E 1998] Eric P. Jensen. Teaching with the Brain in Mind, published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1998, 133 pages, ISBN 0-87120-299-9 (978-0-87120-299-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jensen-E 2001] Eric P. Jensen. Arts with the Brain in Mind, published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001, 139 pages, ISBN 0-87120-514-9 (978-0-87120-514-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jensen-E 2005] Eric P. Jensen. Teaching with the Brain in Mind, Revised Second Edition, published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2005, 186 pages, ISBN 1-4166-0030-2 (978-1-4166-0030-5). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jensen-O 2005] O. Jensen, P. Goel, N. Kopell, M. Pohja, R. Hari, and B. Ermentrout. “On the Human Sensorimotor-cortex Beta Rhythm: Sources and Modeling”, NeuroImage, Volume 26, Number 2, 2005, pages 347–355, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.02.008. Publication 15907295 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Cortical oscillations in the beta band (13–35 Hz) are known to be modulated by the GABAergic agonist benzodiazepine. To investigate the mechanisms generating the approximately 20-Hz oscillations in the human cortex, we administered benzodiazepines to healthy adults and monitored cortical oscillatory activity by means of magnetoencephalography. Benzodiazepine increased the power and decreased the frequency of beta oscillations over rolandic areas. Minimum current estimates indicated the effect to take place around the hand area of the primary sensorimotor cortex. Given that previous research has identified sources of the beta rhythm in the motor cortex, our results suggest that these same motor-cortex beta sources are modulated by benzodiazepine. To explore the mechanisms underlying the increase in beta power with GABAergic inhibition, we simulated a conductance-based neuronal network comprising excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The model accounts for the increase in the beta power, the widening of the spectral peak, and the slowing down of the rhythms with benzodiazepines, implemented as an increase in GABAergic conductance. We found that an increase in IPSCs onto inhibitory neurons was more important for generating neuronal synchronization in the beta band than an increase in IPSCs onto excitatory pyramidal cells.

[Jerkic 1993] Sonja Jerkic. “Burials and Bones: A Summary of Burial Patterns and Human Skeletal Research in Newfoundland and Labrador”, Newfoundland Studies, Volume 9, Number 2, 1993, pages 213–234. ISSN 0823-1737. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jing 2003] M. Jing. “A Theoretical Study of the Vibration and Acoustics of Ancient Chinese Bells”, Journal of the Acoustic Society of America, Volume 114, Number 3, September 2003, pages 1622–1628, doi:10.1121/1.1600727. Publication 14514215 on PubMed/NCBI (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: In this paper, the acoustics of an ancient Chinese bell, which was made some 3000 years B.C., is studied theoretically. In ancient times, a set of the bells was used as a musical instrument. Unlike a western church bell and an ancient Indian bell, an ancient Chinese bell has two interesting acoustics. First, two tones can be heard separately as the bell is struck at two special points. The interval between the two pitches is always a minor or major third. Second, tones of the bell attenuate quickly, which is necessary for a musical instrument. So, an ancient Chinese bell is sometimes called a two-tone bell or a music bell. Although a three-dimensional model should be used to simulate the acoustics of the bell, a simplified model proposed in this paper does give some insight. Based on the lens-shaped cross section of an ancient Chinese bell, two tones of an ancient Chinese bell can be simulated by the vibration of a double-circular arch and the quick attenuation of tones can be simulated by acoustics of a cylinder with the lens-shaped cross section like a double-circular arch. Numerical results on the vibration and acoustics of the models are presented.

[Jishie 1992] Frank Jishie, Jr., Raymond K. Yazzie, Sam Yazzie, Jr., and Sam Yazzie. Navajo Songs from Canyon De Chelly, New World Records, 80406-2, 12 tracks, December 8, 1992, total time 47:35, ASIN B0000030GS, audio CD. See the New World Records web site. Contains 13 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johannes 2009] Joan Wiese Johannes. “What You Say With What You Play: Suggestions for Native American Flute Presenters / Performers”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2009, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2009, pages 5–7. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johansson 2006] Sverker Johansson. “Constraining the Time when Language Evolved”, Papers of the Sixth International Conference on Evolution of Language (Evolang6), Rome, Italy, April 12–15, 2006, Rome, Italy, April 12–15, 2006, 8 pages. See the Evolution of Language Conference web site. Constraining the Time when Language Evolved Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in Europe and Asia

Abstract: The precise timing of the emergence of language in human prehistory cannot be resolved. But the available evidence is sufficient to constrain it to some degree. This is a review and synthesis of the available evidence, leading to the conclusion that the time when speech became important for our ancestors can be constrained to be not less than 500,000 years ago, thus excluding several popular theories involving a late transition to speech.

[John 1947] Chauncey Johnny John and Albert Jones; William N. Fenton (recording and editing). Seneca Songs from Coldspring Longhouse, Library of Congress Music Division, Recording Laboratory, Program Notes to Album 17, 1947. Accompanying audio recording is [Fenton 1948]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson 1974] Paul Conrad Johnson. “Fipple Flute”, United States Patent 3,815,466, Granted June 11, 1974, 9 pages, retrieved December 5, 2009. Fipple Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Patents and Patent Applications Related to Flute Construction

[Johnson-AL 2008] Arthur L. Johnson. Race and Remembrance, published by the Wayne State University Press, 2008. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Simple Gifts - Sheet Music for Native American Flute

[Johnson-F 1951] Frederick Johnson. “Radiocarbon Dating”, American Antiquity, Volume 17, Number 1, Part 2, 1951, pages 5–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: The Development of Flutes in North America (2)

[Johnson-G 2001] Gordon Johnson. “Spreading the Fun! The Native American Flute in the School System”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2001, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2001, pages 5–6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-G 2004] Gordon Johnson. “Spreading the Fun! The Native American Flute in the School System — Part 2”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 16–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-HB 1963] Hugh Bailey Johnson (born 1929). An Investigation of the Tuning Preferences of a Selected Group of Singers with Reference to Just Intonation, Pythagorean Tuning, and Equal Temperament, Mus.Ed.D. dissertation – Indiana University, 1963, 116 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-M 1991] M. Johnson. “Biotic Resources and Site Location: An Argument for Risk Minimization”, contained in Jornada Mogollon Archaeology: Collected Papers from the Fifth and Sixth Jornada Mogollon Conferences, edited by M. Duran and P. Beckett, published by Coas Publishing and Research and Human Systems Research, Las Cruces, New Mexico, 1991, pages 9–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

[Johnson-R 1977] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 1: Madang, Quartz Publications, Quartz 001, 4 tracks, 1977, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (4)

[Johnson-R 1999] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 1: Madang, Rounder Records, CD 5154, 4 tracks, 1999, ASIN B00000K2A8, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (4)

AllMusic review by Rovi: Recorded by Ragnar Johnson in 1976 and considered by some to be the grail of all ethnographic field recordings, MADANG: SACRED FLUTE MUSIC FROM NEW GUINEA is an essential for anyone interested in the margins of recorded sound. In New Guinea the wind has many supernatural connotations. Flute blowing is a mediator between the human and spirit worlds. These nearly six-foot-long flutes are made of bamboo and are brought out exclusively for ceremonial purposes. The sounds released are believed by the players to be actual cries of spirits. These recordings are absolutely transcendent. In four extended tracks, spherical sounds rise and build in otherworldly force with hypnotic results. This album presents a vanishing musical form that expresses the essence of music itself.

[Johnson-R 1999a] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 2: Windim Mambu, Rounder Records, CD 5155, 12 tracks, 1999, ASIN B00001R3K1, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Twelve citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (12)

AllMusic review by Stacia Proefrock: Part of a series in Rounder reissues of great world music recordings, Sacred Flute Music from New Guinea was originally issued by Quartz in 1979. This album features the "Windim Mambu," or sacred flute music of the Madang region of New Guinea; exclusively performed by men, the music is believed to literally become the cries of the spirits for the women and children who hear it coming from the forest. Flute playing of this type is greatly respected within the tribal culture and both the making of the instruments (which are thought to improve with age, having a life span of about 10 years) and the learning of the music are time-consuming processes for which skill is gained slowly. The style itself is highly regulated -- the flutes may not be played outside of certain ceremonial occasions and must remain hidden at other times, away from those who are not allowed to play them. The flutes are also always played in pairs, and they're usually accompanied by percussion, often with slit gongs called garamuts; different pairs are used for different occasions and there is a prohibition on playing for a period of time after someone has died. The music itself is clear and haunting and this collection offers a variety of flute types for occasions ranging from rites of passage to fertility rituals, births, and marriages. All of the tracks are interesting documents of New Guinean music. The final track, however, is one of the most fascinating, featuring a style of flute called a mo-mo, which is a resonating tube into which the user yodels. This instrument had historically been used during male initiation ceremonies and the sense of mystery around that rite has remained in the music.

[Johnson-S 2000] Sherry Johnson. “Authenticity: Who Needs It?”, British Journal of Music Education, Volume 17, Number 3, 2000, pages 277–286. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This article examines the variety of meanings attributed to the concept of authenticity, first in interviews about teaching world musics with high school music teachers, and second, in the music education literature. More recent theorising about authenticity in folklore and anthropology introduces several issues that may help music educators to understand the concept differently, including the dichotomous, constructed and popular conceptions of authenticity, and strategies for pursuing the study of it. This interdisciplinary approach to authenticity suggests that, rather than a deterrent to multicultural music education, the concept can become a useful tool in our teaching.

[Johnson-TA 2008] Timothy A. Johnson. Foundations of Diatonic Theory — A Mathematically Based Approach to Music Fundamentals Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-VE 2013] Valen E. Johnson. “Revised Standards for Statistical Evidence”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 13, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1313476110 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Recent advances in Bayesian hypothesis testing have led to the development of uniformly most powerful Bayesian tests, which represent an objective, default class of Bayesian hypothesis tests that have the same rejection regions as classical significance tests. Based on the correspondence between these two classes of tests, it is possible to equate the size of classical hypothesis tests with evidence thresholds in Bayesian tests, and to equate P values with Bayes factors. An examination of these connections suggest that recent concerns over the lack of reproducibility of scientific studies can be attributed largely to the conduct of significance tests at unjustifiably high levels of significance. To correct this problem, evidence thresholds required for the declaration of a significant finding should be increased to 25–50:1, and to 100–200:1 for the declaration of a highly significant finding. In terms of classical hypothesis tests, these evidence standards mandate the conduct of tests at the 0.005 or 0.001 level of significance.

[Johnston 1976] Thomas F. Johnston. Eskimo Music by Region: A Comparative Circumpolar Study, National Museum of Man Mercury Series, published by the National Museums of Canada, Ottawa, 1976, vii + 222 pages. ISSN 0316-1854, Canadian Ethnology Service, Paper number 32. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnston 1976a] Thomas F. Johnston. “The Eskimo Songs of Northwestern Alaska”, Arctic, Volume 29, 1976, pages 7–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnston-A 2014] Amy Johnston. “Charles Greul: The Non-Aboriginal Forebearer to the Northwest Coast Printmaking Movement”, The Carleton Graduate Journal of Art and Culture, Volume 2, 2014, 19 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Charles Greul was a non-Aborignal printmaker working in the style of the Northwest Coast during the mid-twentieth century. The scarcity of information on his life and work is acute, leaving only a birthdate of 1923, a possible immigrant status and a printmaking career based in British Columbia spanning the 1950s to the early 1960s. This paper discusses his work through four areas of study: authenticity, appropriation, the tourist market and reactions to, and against, his work. Together, they provide a basis from which to discuss the ways Greul and his prints inserted themselves into the changing discourse of Northwest Coast Aboriginal art production, appreciation and dissemination. Cumulatively, this paper aims to provide a contextualization of Greul’s work in order to argue that his prints played a crucial role in the rise of the printmaking medium among Aboriginal artists of the Northwest Coast. One of Greul’s promotional flyers, found in the Carleton Univeristy Art Gallery’s MacDonald collection, is the foundation from which this argument derives.

[Johnston-HH 1886] Harry Hamilton Johnston (1858–1927). The Kilima-Njaro Expedition — A Record of Scientific Exploration in Eastern Equatorial Africa. And a General Description of the Natural History, Languages, and Commerce of the Kilima-Njaro District, published by Kegan Paul, Trench & Company, 1886, 572 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa

[Johnston-HH 1902] Harry Hamilton Johnston. The Uganda Protectorate: An Attempt to Give Some Description of the Physical Geography, Botany, Zoology, Anthropology, Languages and History of the Territories under British Protection in East Central Africa, Between the Congo Free State and the Rift Valley and Between the First Degree of South Latitude and the Fifth Degree of North Latitude, Volume 2, published by Hutchinson & Co., London, 1902. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The Uganda protectorate; an attempt to give some description of the physical geography, botany, zoology, anthropology, languages and history of the territories under British protection in East Central Africa, between the Congo Free State and the Rift Valley and between the first degree of south latitude and the fifth degree of north latitude

[Jones 1939] William Jones. “Ethnography of the Fox Indians”, 1939. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians

[Jones 1981] A. M. Jones. “Peruvian Panpipe Tunings: More on Haeberli's Data”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 25, Number 1, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, January 1981, pages 105–107. Publication 850979 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jones-G 2007] Goode Jones. “Really, Really Old Toe Bone Whistle”, Bulletin of Primitive Technology, Volume 33, published by the Society of Primitive Technology, Utah, Spring 2007. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jones-MJ 2010] Mary Jane Jones. Revival and Community: The History and Practices of a Native American Flute Circle, Master of Arts dissertation – Kent State University, College of the Arts / School of Music, Ohio, August 2010, 69 pages. See the Thesis at the OhioLink web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Much knowledge about the Native American flute was lost following the suppression of Native American musical traditions by the United States government around the turn of the twentieth century. A renewal of interest in the instrument occurred in the latter part of the twentieth century, but few knew how to play the flute stylistically. As flute enthusiasts began meeting to learn and play together, flute circles emerged throughout North America and around the world. This thesis examines one such circle in Northeast Ohio and offers insight into the views and motivations of its members of Native descent. The practices of the flute circle and the relationships that formed among its members are investigated, as well as the reasons why these people have chosen to connect with their roots by means of playing the flute. In order to identify factors contributing to the resurgence of the flute’s popularity, this study attempts to determine whether flutists believe that they are continuing the flute’s traditions or creating a new musical style derived from past Native American flute practices.

This paper also discusses broader trends in Native American music such as the flute circle phenomenon, Pan-Indianism, and integration with New Age music, World music, and other genres.

[Jones-OR 1972] Owen R. Jones, Jr. (field recordings and editor). Music of the Algonkians — Woodland Indians, Cree, Montagnais, Naskapi, Folkways Records and Service Corp., FE 4253, 19 bands, 1972, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Reissued in [Jones-OR 2007]. Library of Congress call number 72-750895. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Jones-OR 2007] Owen R. Jones, Jr. (field recordings and editor). Music of the Algonkians — Woodland Indians, Cree, Montagnais, Naskapi, Smithsonian / Folkways Archival Series, Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings, FE 4253, 19 tracks, 2007, UPC 0-93070-42532-3, ASIN B00242VZW4, audio CD. Source archive: Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Reissue of [Jones-OR 1972]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

Publisher's description: For the Cree, Montagnais, and Naskapi hunters whose songs are represented on this album, success in hunting was crucial because for a time it provided the only means of subsistence. Hunters treated their hunting trips with great devotion and seriousness. Before heading off to hunt, the men would sing songs that had originated in or described dreams they had of the location of game and of their success; all songs, having materialized in dream, were personal and no hunter sang another’s song. Presented here is a collection of personal hunting songs recorded on an Indian settlement in Scheffervilee, P.Q., Canada in 1964.

[Jones-OW 2010] Oliver W. Jones. Wild Horse Mountain Flutes, 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

[Jordan 2009] David K. Jordan. “Prehistoric Beringia: A Beginner's Guide to the Homeland of the Peoples of the Americas”, produced by the University of California, San Diego, October 19, 2009, retrieved June 15, 2010. Prehistoric Beringia Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in the Americas

[Jorgensen 1991] Owen H. {Henry} Jorgensen. Tuning — Containing The Perfection of Eighteenth-Century Temperament, The Lost Art of Nineteenth-Century Temperament, and The Science of Equal Temperament, Complete With Instructions for Aural and Electronic Tuning, published by, Michigan State University Press, East Lansing, Michigan, June 1991, 798 pages, ISBN 0-87013-290-3 (978-0-87013-290-2). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jorgensen 2009] Owen H. {Henry} Jorgensen. About the Temperament Used by J. S. Bach and Others, published by, Frank French on Tuner's Art, 2009, 8 pages, retrieved November 24, 2011. See the Frank French's web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jorio 1832] Andrea de Jorio (1769–1851). La Mimica Degli Antichi Investigata nel Gestire Napoletano «The Mime of the Ancients Investigated through Neapolitan Gesture», Dalla stamperia e cartiera del Fibreno, in Italian, 1832, 382 pages. Publication lamimicadeglian03jorigoog on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joseph 2014] Salim Joseph and Leta M. Slupik; O. K. Mohammed Ali (photographs). “Leta's Flutes”, The Times of Oman, May 8, 2014. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[Joyce 1996] Kathleen Ann Joyce. The Native American Flute in the Southwestern United States: Past and Present, D.M.A. dissertation – University of Arizona, 1996. Dissertation Abstracts International order number DA9713378. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 1997a] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Myths and Legends”, Voice of the Wind, Year 1997, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 1997, pages 5–7. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 1997b] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “New Note Found for the Six-Hole Native American Flute”, Voice of the Wind, Year 1997, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 1997, pages 13–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 1997c] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “An Interview with John Rainer, Jr.”, Voice of the Wind, Year 1997, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 1997, pages 12–14. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 1998a] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Nakai's TABlature System for the Native American Flute”, Voice of the Wind, Year 1998, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 1998, pages 2–6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Nakai Tablature for the Native American Flute

[Joyce-Grendahl 2000] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Eagle Bone Whistles — Description, Usage, and Etiquette”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2000, Volume 3, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2000, pages 5–9. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2004] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “It's Not Music! — Addressing Eurocentrism”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 15–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2009] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Breathing as a Musician”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2009, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2009, pages 7–10. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Breath Practices for Flute Players

[Joyce-Grendahl 2009a] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Labelling Your Flutes Correctly: The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2009, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2009, page 16. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Native American Flute - Honoring the Tradition

[Joyce-Grendahl 2010] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “The Norwegian Seljefløyte”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2010, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2010, pages 6–7. See the INAFA web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: World Flutes (2)

[Joyce-Grendahl 2010a] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Embracing TABlature”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2010, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2010, pages 15–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2010b] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “The Tongan Nose-Flute, the Fangufangu”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2010, Volume 3, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2010, pages 14–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2010c] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Indian Arts and Crafts Amendment of 2010”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2010, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2010, page 28. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Native American Flute - Honoring the Tradition

[Joyce-Grendahl 2011] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “The Ocarina: One Potato, Two Potato, Sweet Potato …”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2011, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2011, pages 18–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2011a] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “The Tin Whistle”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2011, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2011. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2012] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Getting the Most Out of a Private Flute Lesson”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2012, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2012. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judd 1930] Neil Merton Judd. The Excavation and Repair of Betatakin, Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Volume 77, Number 5, 1930. The Excavation and Repair of Betatakin Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Judd 1936] Neil Merton Judd. “Walter Hough: An Appreciation”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 38, Number 3, published by the, American Anthropological Association, 1930, pages 471–481. Publication 662191 on JSTOR (subscription access). Walter Hough: An Appreciation Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks

[Judd 1954] Neil M. Judd; Glover M. Allen (appendix). The Material Culture of Pueblo Bonito — With Appendix: Canid Remains from Pueblo Bonito and Pueblo del Arroyo, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Volume 124, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., December 29, 1954, 398 pages, retrieved September 12, 2010. Publication 4172. Publication smithsonianmisce1241954smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 1910] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest — Especially of Washington and Oregon, published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago, 1910, xvi + 145 pages, hardcover. Reissued in [Judson 1997]. Publication mythslegendsofpa00juds on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Articulation on the Native American Flute

[Judson 1912] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest, published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago, April 1912, xvi + 193 pages, retrieved March 13, 2010, hardcover. OCLC Number 1106276. Reissued in [Judson 2001], [Judson 2008], [Judson 2008a], [Judson 2009]. Publication mythslegcaliold00judsrich on Archive.org (open access). See the Archive.org web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 1913] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of the Great Plains, published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago, November 1913. Reissued in [Judson 2007]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 1997] Katharine Berry Judson (editor); Jay Miller (introduction). Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest, Second Edition, published by Bison Books, 1997, 193 pages, ISBN 0-8032-7595-1 (978-0-8032-7595-9), softcover. Reissue of [Judson 1910]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: Tribal Identification (5)

Publisher's description: These collected myths and tales of the Indians of the Pacific Northwest—the Klamath, Nez Perce, Tillamook, Modoc, Shastan, Chinook, Flathead, Clatsop, and other tribes—were first published in 1910. Here are their stories concerning the creation of the universe, the theft of fire and daylight, the death and rebirth of salmon, and especially, the formation of such geographical features as The Dalles, the Columbia River, the Yukon River, and Mounts Shasta, Hood, Rainier, Baker, and Adams.

Katharine Berry Judson began with native oral tradition in retelling these stories. They represent, as Jay Miller says, “a distillation of tribal memory and a personification of environmental wisdom.” Some legends—“Duration of Life,” “Old Grizzly and Old Antelope,” and “Robe of Kemush”—are almost literal translations, recorded by government ethnologists. Animating the beautifully wrought tales are entities like Coyote, Old Man Above, Owl and Raven and other Animal People, and Chinook Ghosts.

[Judson 2001] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest, published by Project Gutenberg, February 1, 2001, retrieved March 13, 2010. Reissue of [Judson 1912]. See the Project Gutenberg Ebook #2503 web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 2007] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of the Great Plains, published by Project Gutenberg, July 16, 2007, retrieved March 13, 2010. Reissue of [Judson 1913]. See the Project Gutenberg Ebook #22083 web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 2008] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest, Second Edition, published by HardPress, 2008, 254 pages, ISBN 1-4069-9029-9 (978-1-4069-9029-4), softcover. Reissue of [Judson 1912]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 2008a] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest, published by Forgotten Books, 2008, 146 pages, ISBN 1-60506-834-9 (978-1-60506-834-3), hardcover. Reissue of [Judson 1912]. See the Forgotten Books web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Judson 2009] Katharine Berry Judson (editor). Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest, published by Plain Label Books, February 2001, 138 pages, ISBN 1-60303-620-2 (978-1-60303-620-7), softcover. Reissue of [Judson 1912]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Jukebox 2012] Global Jukebox (record company). The Southern Journey of Alan Lomax Words, Photographs, and Music, Global Jukebox, 2012, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

[Jurrens 1965] James Jurrens. The Music of the Sioux Indians of the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and Its Use in the Elementary School, Ed.D. dissertation – The Graduate Division, Colorado State College (which later became the University of Northern Colorado). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

26 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (13), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (13)

[Juslin 2008] Patrik N. Juslin and Daniel Västfjäll. “Emotional Responses to Music: The Need to Consider Underlying Mechanisms”, Behavoiral and Brain Sciences, Volume 31, 2008, pages 559–621, doi:10.1017/S0140525X08005293 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Research indicates that people value music primarily because of the emotions it evokes. Yet, the notion of musical emotions remains controversial, and researchers have so far been unable to offer a satisfactory account of such emotions. We argue that the study of musical emotions has suffered from a neglect of underlying mechanisms. Specifically, researchers have studied musical emotions without regard to how they were evoked, or have assumed that the emotions must be based on the “default” mechanism for emotion induction, a cognitive appraisal. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework featuring six additional mechanisms through which music listening may induce emotions: (1) brain stem reflexes, (2) evaluative conditioning, (3) emotional contagion, (4) visual imagery, (5) episodic memory, and (6) musical expectancy. We propose that these mechanisms differ regarding such characteristics as their information focus, ontogenetic development, key brain regions, cultural impact, induction speed, degree of volitional influence, modularity, and dependence on musical structure. By synthesizing theory and findings from different domains, we are able to provide the first set of hypotheses that can help researchers to distinguish among the mechanisms. We show that failure to control for the underlying mechanism may lead to inconsistent or non-interpretable findings. Thus, we argue that the new framework may guide future research and help to resolve previous disagreements in the field. We conclude that music evokes emotions through mechanisms that are not unique to music, and that the study of musical emotions could benefit the emotion field as a whole by providing novel paradigms for emotion induction.

[Juslin 2010] Patrik N. Juslin and John Sloboda (editors). Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications, published by Oxford University Press, April 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Juzhong 2005] Zhang Juzhong and Lee Yun Kuen. “The Magic Flutes”, Natural History Magazine, Volume 114, Number 7, September 2005, pages 43–49. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The village of Jiahu (河南省舞陽縣賈湖) is located almost exactly between the Huai River (淮河) and Huang He (黃河). Archaeologists have found many flutes made from the bones of the red-crowned crane. These 9,000-year old flutes are the oldest playable flutes yet found in the world. The excavations at this site have yielded valuable insights into not just the material life of ancient China, but its cultural life as well.

 
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