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Ethnographic Recordings

This is a list of references related to ethnographic recordings that are cited throughout Flutopedia. See the Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings page and following pages for the collection of these recordings on Flutopedia.

The references on this page are a sub-set of the complete list of Flutopedia references.

For information on the format and other details of these citations, see the main references page.

Ethnographic Recordings

[Abraham 1906] Otto Abraham and Erich Moritz von Hornbostel. “Phonographierte Indianermelodien aus Britisch-Columbia «Indian Melodies from British Columbia Recorded on the Phonograph»”, Anthropological Papers, Written in Honor of Franz Boas, published by Stechert, New York, in German, 1906, pages 447–474. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Abraham 1975] Otto Abraham and Erich Moritz von Hornbostel; Bruno Nettl (translation). “Phonographierte Indianermelodien aus Britisch-Columbia «Indian Melodies from British Columbia Recorded on the Phonograph»”, contained in [Wachsmann 1975], Volume 1, 1975, pages 299–322. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Allen-NJ 1976] Nicholas J. Allen. Studies in the Myths and Oral Traditions of the Thulung Rai of East Nepal, Doctoral dissertation – University of Oxford, England, 1976, 762 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia

[ARC 2006] ARC Music. Bushmen of the Kalahari, Arc Music, EUCD1995, 35 tracks, 2006, total time 72:36, ASIN B000EHSV6Y Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (2)

Publisher's description: This album documents the almost extinct Bushman culture in Southern Africa. It contains Bushmen shaman healing rituals, hunting songs, rain-making songs, tracking songs, a spoken history of the Qwii… accompanied on authentic self-built instruments by some of the last Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert.

[Asch 1973] Michael I. Asch (compiled and edited). An Anthology of North American Indian & Eskimo Music, Ethnic Folkways Records, FE 4541, 1973. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (2)

[Bhattacharya 1999] Deben Bhattacharya. Folksongs and Sacred Music from Nepal, Arc Music, EUCD 1517, 15 tracks, August 24, 1999. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia (2)

Review by Bruno Deschênes on AllMusic.com: Nepal has a diversified music. On the one hand, raga music (an influence from India) is considered their national art, while folk music is regional and is related to the different ethnic people of Nepal. Except for two excerpts of raga pieces ("Basant" and "Ramkali"), this CD presents a sampling of the folk and sacred music of Nepal. In fact, religious and folk music are closely tied to the music of the Himalayas. There are also farming, seasonal, heroic songs, and dances, but with religious characters underlying them. Despite India's influence on their music, they have very few instruments: the Nepalese Sarangi, the Basuri (the Nepalese version of the Indian Bansuri, a bamboo transverse flute), the Bai (a straight wooden flute), and the Ponga (a long copper horn), plus a good number of percussion instruments (such as drums, cymbals, and more), which will vary, depending on the ethnic people a song or dance comes from. A most pleasing and enchanting music.

[Bhattacharya 2004] Deben Bhattacharya. Bedouins of the Middle East — Field Recordings by Deben Bhattacharya (1955, 1960), Arc Music, EUCD1910, 14 tracks, 2004, total time 53:38, ASIN B00BURMREO Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of the Middle East

Publisher's description: Field recordings made in 1955 and 1960 by ethnomusicologist Deben Bhattacharya. Recorded in Bedouin camps in the desert no-man’s land between Jordan and Iraq. Communal coffee grinding and drinking ritual in the tents after sundown. Pictures and an excerpt from Bhattacharya’s journal, plus extensive notes about music and instruments in four languages.

[Bhattacharya 2013] Deben Bhattacharya. The Music of Uzbekistan — Field Recordings by Deben Bhattacharya, Arc Music, EUCD2438, 14 tracks, 2013, total time 54:55, ASIN B00ARWDS4Q Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia (2)

Publisher's description: Uzbekistan was the half-way point of the fabled "Silk Road" from the Mediterranean to Xian in China. The music which was recorded in 1970 in Tashkent by ethnomusicologist Deben Bhattacharya, recalls the ancient oriental beauty and mystery. Traditional instruments: chang, (dulcimer), rubab (lute), dutar (lute), ney (flute), doira (frame drum) and more.

[Brady 1984] Erika Brady, Maria La Vigna, Dorothy Sara Lee, and Thomas Vennum, Jr. The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 1: Introduction and Inventory, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 1, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 105 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

Abstract: Volume one of a multivolume catalog inventories 247 federal agency collections of wax cylinder recordings made by early ethnographers during 5 decades (1890-1941) of field work with Native American, traditional American, and world cultures. Native American music, chants, and linguistic samples comprise the majority of the collection. In addition to their value as original cultural materials, the collections chronicle theoretical and methodological developments in anthropology, ethnomusicology, folklore, and linguistics, parallel the early history of sound recording, and reflect differing attitudes among early ethnographers toward use of the cylinder phonograph. Inventory entries are arranged alphabetically by collector with larger collections grouped into cultural areas. Each entry contains preservation tape number, Archive of Folk Culture number, number of cylinders in each collection/number duplicated, collector's name/sponsor, descriptive title, recording date/location, provenance, and notes on technical aspects of sound and cylinder quality. An introduction traces the mechanics and use of the cylinder phonograph from the 1890s to the early 1940s, discusses field methods of early ethnographers, and explains preservation methods, documenting and archiving techniques, and dissemination efforts of the Federal Cylinder Project. Indexes to American Indian groups, other cultural groups by region, and collectors, institutions, sponsors, and provenances are included. (LFL)

[Brunet 1972] Jacques Brunet (collector). Laos — Musique du Nord «Laos - Music of the North», Collection Musiques du Monde, volume 12, Galloway Records, GB 600531, 1972, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia

[Casey 2007] Mike Casey and Bruce Gordon. Sound Directions: Best Practices for Audio Preservation, 2007, 160 pages. Sound Directions Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Charters 1978] Samuel Charters. African Flutes (Gambia), Ethnic Folkways, FE-4230, 10 tracks, 1978, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Reissued in [Charters 2004]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Ten citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (10)

Liner Notes: Recorded in the vi lIages of Basse and Diabugu Tenda in the upper Gambia basin in November, 1976.

[Charters 2004] Samuel Charters. African Flutes (Gambia), Smithsonian / Folkways, FW04230, 10 tracks, 2004, audio CD. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4230. Reissue of [Charters 1978]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Liner Notes: Recorded in the vi lIages of Basse and Diabugu Tenda in the upper Gambia basin in November, 1976.

[Clayton-M 1996] Martin Clayton. “Ethnographic Wax Cylinders at the British Library National Sound Archive: A Brief History and Description of the Collection”, British Journal of Ethnomusicology, Volume 5, published by the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, 1996, pages 67–92. Publication 3060867 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

Abstract: The ethnographic wax cylinder collection held at the British Library National Sound Archive, totalling over 3,000 items, contains material of considerable musical and historical interest, much of which has been until now little known outside the Archive. This paper summarises the history of the recordings and thier accumulation under a single roof, and briefly describes their significance, with the aid of quotations from contemporary sources. The history of the collection is discussed with reference to the earliest recordings, recordings from Oceania, Australia, Africa, South Asia and other areas, connections with other archives, and the current situation.

[Coppens-W 1975] Walter Coppens, Barbara Brändli, and Jean François Nothomb. Music of the Venezuelan Yekuana (Makiritare) Indians, Smithsonian / Folkways, FW04104, 15 tracks, 1975. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of South America (2)

Publisher's description: "The Yekuana Indians, also known as Makiritare, whose total population is estimated at 1,500 to 2,000 persons, are the people whose life is closely related to the rivers as is suggested by their tribal name, which can be translated as ‘curiara (dugout canoa) people’ or ‘river people.’ When discovered around 1758-59 by the Spaniards, the Yekuana lived along several tributaries of the Upper Orinoco."

[Courlander 1957] Harold Courlander (compiler); Alan P. Merriam (liner notes). Africa South of the Sahara, Smithsonian / Folkways, FW04503, 38 tracks, 1957. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa

Publisher's description: This 1957 compilation attempts to provide a musical overview of the entire Sub–Saharan region, and also represents the scholarly contribution of American ethnomusicologist Alan P. Merriam (1923 — 1980) to the Folkways catalog. Merriam, who is best remembered for the book The Anthropology of Music, produced the album and provided an essay and track notes. This title went a long way towards dispelling prejudices and misconceptions listeners of the time may have had about African music. Merriam wrote, “The African music system works by its own rules and satisfies those who play it and sing it; it is neither necessarily older nor younger nor better nor worse.”

[CSWR 2008] Center for Southwest Research. Indian Music of the Southwest and Mexico Collection, 2008, set of audio CDs (four) plus guidebook with background information. Collection Number MU 4. Indian Music of the Southwest and Mexico Collection Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America (2)

Abstract: This collection of sound recordings was donated to the John Donald Robb Archive of Southwestern Music by the Music Department of the University of New Mexico. It consisted of three reels of pre-1963 commercial recordings of Native American music from Mexico and the Southwestern United States, which have been reformatted to cd.

The collection is a representation of the music traditions of various Southwestern American Indian and Mexican tribes. It consists of songs duplicated from commercial records that were, in turn, based on the field recordings collected by several notable folk music historians. The name of the native group is given when known, as is the name of the collector. The songs in this collection from Laura Boulton and Willard Rhodes also appear on commercial albums, which are catalogued and held by the UNM Library. Those from John H. Green and John S. Candelario are not found elsewhere in this Library, and are unique.

Various native languages are used in these recordings. There are songs from the Yaqui, Yuma, Chichimeca, Maya, Tarascan, Otomi, Zapotec and Ticul Indians. Others are songs of the Pima, Papago, Mohave and Hopi. In addition, there are songs from the pueblos of Taos, Zuni, San Ildefonso and Santa Ana, and from the Navajo, Apache and Mescalero Apache peoples. Some of the songs are in Spanish.

[CSWR 2010] Center for Southwest Research. James B. Wright Collection of Southwestern Native American and Hispanic Music, Interviews and Literary Programs, 2010. James B. Wright Collection of Southwestern Native American and Hispanic Music, Interviews and Literary Programs Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

Abstract: This broad collection contains traditional Southwestern Native American and Hispanic folk music, and popular music, dances, poetry readings and interviews collected in the 1970s and 1980s. Also included are Spanish medieval music, a Belen Los Pastores presentation, Matachines music from Tortugas, a Corrales history pageant, Anglo American country western songs and fiddle tunes, Laotian songs from Albuquerque, and a lecture by John Donald Robb.

[Davis-EA 1997] Elizabeth A. Davis, Pamela Bristah, Jane Gottlieb, Kent Underwood, and William E. Anderson (editors). A Basic Music Library: Essential Scores and Sound Recordings, Third edition, published by the American Library Association, 1997, 665 pages, ISBN 0-8389-3461-7 (978-0-8389-3461-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Lists 7,000 recordings and 3,000 printed scores coded for different levels of collecting.

[Densmore 1926a] Frances Densmore. “Music of the Tule Indians of Panama”, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Volume 77, Number 11, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 16, 1926, 39 pages, retrieved March 24, 2011. Publication 2864. Publication smithsonianmisce771926smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America

Introduction: A remarkable opportunity for the study of primitive music was recently afforded by the presence of eight Tule Indians in Washington. These Indians were from the Isthmus of Darien in Panama and were brought to the United States by Mr. R. O. Marsh. The five adults in the group were of normal Indian color and the three children were fair, being examples of the "white Indians," whose occurrence among the Tule has caused the tribe to be known by that name. The Tule live on islands near the coast of the Caribbean Sea from San Bias Point to Armila, a distance of 120 miles. They also hold the San Bias Range of mountains on the mainland.

This study was done entirely with the adult members of the group during portions of November and December, 1924, and was made possible by the courtesy of Mr. Marsh. The work was under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution.

[Dutton 1999] Lee S. Dutton. Anthropological Resources: A Guide to Archival, Library, and Museum Collections, published by Taylor & Francis, 1999, 517 pages, ISBN 0-8153-1188-5 (978-0-8153-1188-1), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings (2)

Publisher's description: This work provides access to information on the rich and often little known legacy of anthropological scholarship preserved in a diversity of archives, libraries and museums. Selected anthropological manuscripts, papers, fieldnotes, site reports, photographs and sound recordings in more than 150 repositories are described. Coverage of resources in North American repositories is extensive while Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Australia and certain other countries are more selectively represented. Entries are arranged by repository location and most contributors draw upon a special knowledge of the resources described. Contributors include James R. Glenn (National Anthropological Archives), Elizabeth Edwards and Veronica Lawrence (Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford), Francisco Demetrio, S.J. (Museum and Archives, Xavier University, Philippines) and many others. The guide covers selected documentation in social and cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology and folklore. Somemajor area studies collections (such as the Asia Collections, Cornell University Libraries, and the Melanesian Archive at the University of California, San Diego) are also represented. Web URLs have been cited when available and personal, and ethnic name indexes are provided.

[Erguner 1995] Kudsi Erguner. La Flûte Sacrée des Derviches Tourneurs «The Sacred Flute of the Whirling Dervishes», 7 tracks, 1995. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of the Middle East

[FCPS 1981] Federal Cylinder Project Staff. Inventory of Instantaneous Cylinder Recordings Documenting Folk Culture in the Collections of Federal Agencies — Unpublished document circulated by the American Folklife Center, May 15, 1981, 71 pages, manuscript (typewritten). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

[Feaster 2007] Patrick Feaster. "The Following Record": Making Sense of Phonographic Performance, 1877–1908, Doctoral dissertation – Indiana University, April 2007, 722 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gray 1985] Judith A. Gray and Dorothy Sara Lee (editors). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 2: Northeastern Indian Catalog and Southeastern Indian Catalog, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 2, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 421 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

34 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (17), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (17)

Abstract: Two catalogs inventory field-recorded wax cylinders which document the music and language of Indian tribes in northeastern and southeastern United States from 1890-1930. The Northeastern Indian Catalog contains entries for 738 cylinders comprising 16 music and spoken word collections from the Chippewa, Fox, Iroquois, Kickapoo, Menominee, Passamaquoddy, Sauk, Shawnee, and Winnebago. The Southeastern Indian Catalog contains entries for 268 cylinders comprising 6 music and spoken word collections from the Alabama, Catawba, Cherokee, Chitimacha, Choctaw, and Seminole. Each catalog has its own introductory chapter and is divided into alphabetically arranged segments representing individual tribes or culture groups; cylinders in each segment are listed alphabetically by collector or collection. Introductions to each segment summarize basic information of scope, recording locations and dates, institutional affiliations, collectors, and collection characteristics. Bibliographies list published and unpublished materials. Catalog entries refer to individual cylinders and contain cylinder number, Archive of Folk Culture number, number assigned by collector, duration and quality of cylinder, collector's description of contents, performer, recording location and date, and notes containing technical information about sound quality, textual clarification, and genre classification. Maps show sites of field recordings. Photographs of collectors and performers appear throughout. Concordances accompany two large collection segments. (LFL)

[Gray 1988] Judith A. Gray (editor). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 3: Great Basin/Plateau Indian Catalog, Northwest Coast/Arctic Indian Catalog, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 3, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1988, 300 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Two catalogs inventory wax cylinder collections, field recorded among Native American groups, 1890-1942. The catalog for Great Basin and Plateau Indian tribes contains entries for 174 cylinders in 7 collections from the Flathead, Nez Perce, Thompson/Okanagon, Northern Ute, and Yakima tribes. The catalog for Northwest Coast and Arctic Indian tribes contains entries for 498 cylinders in 20 collections from the Carrier, Clackamas Chinook, Clayoquot, Mainland Comox, Polar Eskimos, Halkomelem, Ingalik, Kalapuya, Kwakiutl, Makah, Nitinat, Nootka, Quileute, Shasta, Squamish, Tlingit, Tsimshian, Tututni, and Upper Umpqua. Collectors include Frances Densmore, Leo Joachim Frachtenberg, and 10 others. Catalog introductions provide information about the collectors and their aims, the circumstances of recording expeditions, and aspects of classification. Collection introductions summarize basic information about scope, organization, recording locations and dates, institutional affiliations, and collectors. Individual entries include cylinder number, Archive of Folk Culture number, number assigned by collector, duration and quality of recording, collector's description of contents, performer, location and date of recording, and technical notes. Selected bibliographies contain published and unpublished materials: 34 references for the first catalog; 70 references for the second catalog. Maps show sites of field recordings. (SV)

[Gray 1990] Judith A. Gray and Edwin J. Schupman, Jr. (editors). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 5: California Indian Catalog, Middle and South American Indian Catalog, Southwestern Indian Catalog-1, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 5, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 528 pages, ISBN 0-8444-0677-5 (978-0-8444-0677-0). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

22 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (10), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (10), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America (2)

[Gray 1996] Judith A. Gray. “Returning Music to the Makers: The Library of Congress, American Indians, and the Federal Cylinder Project”, Cultural Survival Quarterly, Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 1996. Returning Music to the Makers Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings (3), A Brief History of the Native American Flute

Lead paragraph: The United States Library of Congress houses the country's largest collection of early recordings of American Indian music, recorded originally on wax cylinders and today also preserved on high quality audio tape. The Archive of Folk Culture now includes approximately 10,000 cylinder recordings from private individuals and from other agencies of the U.S. government. Especially important among the latter were the materials assembled by the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology. Of the 10,000 cylinders, nearly 8,000 document the sung and spoken traditions of American Indian communities. Among them were the earliest known field recordings - Passamaquoddy songs and narratives by Noel Josephs and Peter Selmore, recorded by Jesse Walter Fewkes in Calais, Maine, in March 1890. They had been transferred to the Library by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University.

[Gunselman 2009] Cheryl Gunselman and Loran Olsen. The Nez Perce Music Archive, March 2009, 5 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The Nez Perce Music Archive consists of recordings of songs, as well as some speeches and legends, in various audio formats. These were originally recorded between 1897 and 1974. Loran Olsen, Music Professor at Washington State University from 1965 to 1993, gathered these recordings together from a variety of different sources and called this project the Nez Perce Music Archive. In cooperation with the Nez Perce Tribe, he has released several collections of these recordings for educational purposes, beginning in 1972. Each one of these, with a total of over 600 recordings in all, is a part of the Archive project.

[Hague 1915] Eleanor Hague. “Eskimo Songs”, The Journal of American Folklore, Volume 28, Number 107, published by The American Folklore Soceity, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January–March 1915, pages 96–98. Publication 534562 on JSTOR (subscription access). Publication jstor-534562 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The following Eskimo tunes were recorded by Captain George Comer on the west coast of Hudson Bay, near Cape Fullerton. Nos. 1 and 2 are chorus songs sung by women. No. 2 probably accompanies the chant of a single singer. No. 3 is a chant sung by a single person. The cylinders from which the records were made are rather faint, and part of them were so indistinct that it was impossible to catch the tune.

[Hardin 2003] James Hardin. “The Archive of Folk Culture at 75: A National Project with Many Workers”, Folklife Center News, Volume 25, Number 2, Spring 2003, pages 3–15. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

[Heizer 1981] Robert F. Heizer and Thodora Kroeber (editors). Ishi: The Last Yahi — A Documentary History, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, 1981, 244 pages, ISBN 0-520-04366-9, softcover. Library of Congress call number 76-19966. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hofmann 1947a] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). American Indian Songs and Dances, Ethnic Series of World Folkways, DISC Company of America, No. 161, 21 songs, 1947, set of 78 rpm 10" audio discs (six). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

Introduction: The recordings included in this disc were collected in Wisconsin at the Upper Dells of the Wisconsin River where morc than 200 American Indians from five different tribes assembled for the annual Stand Rock Indian Ceremonial. The neighboring Winnebago people were joined by the Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni and Acoma - distinct groups of Ihe Woodlands, the Plains and the Southwest.

[Hofmann 1964] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). War Whoops and Medicine Songs — The Music of the American Indians Including Songs of the Winnebago, Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni & Acoma, Ethnic Folkways Library, Folkways Records, FE-4381, 32 tracks, 1964, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4381. [Hofmann 1952] is a related book. Reissued in [Hofmann 2001]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Fifteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (7), Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (7)

Introduction: The recordings included in this disc were collected in Wisconsin at the Upper Dells of the Wisconsin River where morc than 200 American Indians from five different tribes assembled for the annual Stand Rock Indian Ceremonial. The neighboring Winnebago people were joined by the Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni and Acoma - distinct groups of Ihe Woodlands, the Plains and the Southwest.

[Hofmann 2001] Charles Hofmann (collector and editor). War Whoops and Medicine Songs: The Music of the American Indians Including Songs of the Winnebago, Chippewa, Sioux, Zuni & Acoma, Smithsonian / Folkways, F-4381, 32 tracks, 2001, audio CD. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4381. [Hofmann 1952] is a related book. Reissue of [Hofmann 1964]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huck 2010] John S. Huck. “Descriptive Metadata for Audio-Oriented Digital Collections”, 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Idafabera 1996] Chek Idafabera (primary artist); Claire Levasseur (editing); Toupouri (performer, primary artist); Nathalie Fernando and Fabrice Marandola (liner notes). Cameroun: Flûtes des Monts Mandara «Cameroon: Flutes of Mandara Mountains», France, Ocora Records, 560110, 19 tracks, 1996, total time 63:24. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Nineteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (19)

[Indiana 1975] Indiana University. A Catalog of Phonorecordings of Music and Oral Data Held by the Archives of Traditional Music, published by G. K. Hall, Boston, Massachusetts, 1975, 541 pages, ISBN 0-8161-1120-0 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: A Brief History of the Native American Flute

[Ishi 1992] Ishi; T. T. Waterman (recording engineer); Bernie Krause (audio restoration). Ishi: The Last Yahi — Recorded 1911-14 on wax cylinder, Wild Sanctuary, 12 tracks, 1992, audio cassette. Reissued in [Ishi 2008]. See the Wild Sanctuary web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Review by Backroads Music/Heartbeats from All Music Guide: Originally recorded in 1911 and 1915, these remastered recordings feature Ishi, speaking and singing in his native language for Professor A.E. Kroeber's wax cylinder machine. Ishi was the last surviving member of the Yahi who was found in 1911 and taken to the University of California Anthropology Museum in San Francisco. Bernie Krause recently de-noised the original recordings, providing an exceptional window through which we can sense the spiritual symmetries of Ishi's life and his haunting presence.

[Ishi 2008] Ishi; T. T. Waterman (recording engineer); Bernie Krause (audio restoration). Ishi: The Last Yahi — Recorded 1911-14 on wax cylinder, Wild Sanctuary, 12 tracks, 2008, audio CD. All Music Guide Album ID R-170081. Reissue of [Ishi 1992]. See the Wild Sanctuary web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

Publisher's description: Originally recorded on Edison wax cylinder machines in 1911-14, mostly by T.T. Waterman of the U.C. Museum of Anthropology in San Francisco (now the Phoebe Hearst Museum, Berkeley, CA), this material features ISHI, the last surviving member of the California Yahi tribe. The last native speaker of the Yahi language, he sings traditional songs and tells stories in his native tongue. NOTE: This is an archival recording -- over 100 years old! Many of the unwanted surface noises, clicks and distortions of the original, century-old recordings have been reduced; what breaks through is Ishi's own remarkable voice -- emerging, like an echo from the past.

[Johnson-R 1977] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 1: Madang, Quartz Publications, Quartz 001, 4 tracks, 1977, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (4)

[Johnson-R 1999] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 1: Madang, Rounder Records, CD 5154, 4 tracks, 1999, ASIN B00000K2A8, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (4)

AllMusic review by Rovi: Recorded by Ragnar Johnson in 1976 and considered by some to be the grail of all ethnographic field recordings, MADANG: SACRED FLUTE MUSIC FROM NEW GUINEA is an essential for anyone interested in the margins of recorded sound. In New Guinea the wind has many supernatural connotations. Flute blowing is a mediator between the human and spirit worlds. These nearly six-foot-long flutes are made of bamboo and are brought out exclusively for ceremonial purposes. The sounds released are believed by the players to be actual cries of spirits. These recordings are absolutely transcendent. In four extended tracks, spherical sounds rise and build in otherworldly force with hypnotic results. This album presents a vanishing musical form that expresses the essence of music itself.

[Johnson-R 1999a] Ragnar Johnson (engineer, liner notes, photography); Jessica Mayer (engineer). Sacred Flute Music From New Guinea — Volume 2: Windim Mambu, Rounder Records, CD 5155, 12 tracks, 1999, ASIN B00001R3K1, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Twelve citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (12)

AllMusic review by Stacia Proefrock: Part of a series in Rounder reissues of great world music recordings, Sacred Flute Music from New Guinea was originally issued by Quartz in 1979. This album features the "Windim Mambu," or sacred flute music of the Madang region of New Guinea; exclusively performed by men, the music is believed to literally become the cries of the spirits for the women and children who hear it coming from the forest. Flute playing of this type is greatly respected within the tribal culture and both the making of the instruments (which are thought to improve with age, having a life span of about 10 years) and the learning of the music are time-consuming processes for which skill is gained slowly. The style itself is highly regulated -- the flutes may not be played outside of certain ceremonial occasions and must remain hidden at other times, away from those who are not allowed to play them. The flutes are also always played in pairs, and they're usually accompanied by percussion, often with slit gongs called garamuts; different pairs are used for different occasions and there is a prohibition on playing for a period of time after someone has died. The music itself is clear and haunting and this collection offers a variety of flute types for occasions ranging from rites of passage to fertility rituals, births, and marriages. All of the tracks are interesting documents of New Guinean music. The final track, however, is one of the most fascinating, featuring a style of flute called a mo-mo, which is a resonating tube into which the user yodels. This instrument had historically been used during male initiation ceremonies and the sense of mystery around that rite has remained in the music.

[Keeling 1991] Richard Keeling. A Guide to Early Field Recordings (1900–1949) at the Lowie Museum of Anthropology, University of California Publications: Catalogs and Bibliographies, Volume 6, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1991, 487 pages, ISBN 0-520-09720-3 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Sixteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (7), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (7), Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings, A Brief History of the Native American Flute

Introduction: Sound recordings at the Lowie Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, include songs and spoken texts collected among Indian tribal groups all over California, and the core of the collection consists of 2,510 items that were originally recorded on 2,713 wax cylinders between 1900 and 1938 as part of a systematic program to document aboriginal cultures of the region. Only the Library of Congress and the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University (Bloomington) have larger collections of cylinder originals, but in both cases the recordings were brought together from different sources and represent a broad sampling of Indian cultures from all over North America, as well as recordings from abroad. The collection described here is the largest that focuses on a single culture area, and it is illuminated by an extensive body of published writings and manuscripts.

[Kipiani 2006] David Kipiani. ქართული საციონალური ინსტრუმენტული მუსიკა «Georgian National Instrumental Music», Sano Studio / Art Land, 15 tracks, September 22, 2006, ASIN B004PGNKLQ Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia

[Koch 2004] Lars-Christian Koch, Albrecht Wiedmann and Susanne Ziegler. “The Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv: A Treasury of Sound Recordings”, Acoustical Science and Technology, Volume 25, Number 4, published by the Acoustical Society of Japan, 2004, pages 227–231, doi:10.1250/ast.25.227. ISSN online: 1347-5177, print: 1346-3969. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

Preface: Throughout its history of more than one hundred years the Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv devoted its activities to the collection of and research on traditional music from all over the world. While the sound carriers and recording techniques have changed, the purpose of the sound archive has remained the same: the collection, preservation, research and publication of the world’s musical traditions.

As part of the ethnomusicology department of the Museum of Ethnology in Berlin (formerly the Museum fu¨r Vo¨lkerkunde), the Phonogramm-Archiv today comprises one of the finest and most comprehensive collections of traditional music worldwide. The Archive’s early wax cylinder collections, which were collected with a phonograph on wax cylinders between 1893 and 1954, received the honour of being entered into the UNESCO register ‘‘Memory of the World’’ in 1999.

In this tutorial paper, we will introduce the history of Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv, its collections, current research and recording activities.

[Laade 1971] Wolfgang Laade (producer, recording engineer). Music from South New Guinea, Folkways Records, FW04216, 26 tracks, 1971. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Oceana (3)

Publisher's description: Music from South New Guinea presents the music of tribes settled between the Fly River and the West Arian. Included are songs and dances such as the badara, a traditional dance performed at social events and holidays that is characterized by an “elastic syncopation…created by the drum being slightly faster than the metre of the song….” Among native instruments featured are the burari (flute), the dárombi (similar to a jew’s harp), tátaro (bundled panpipe), and búrubur (hour-glass-shaped drum). Liner notes provide an overview of the history and music of South New Guinea, track notes, pictures, and musical transcriptions.

[Lee 1979] Dorothy Sara Lee (compilation); Willard Rhodes (foreward). Native North American Music and Oral Data: A Catalogue of Sound Recordings 1873-1976, published by the Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 1979, xiv + 463 pages, ISBN 0-7837-9656-0 (978-0-7837-9656-7). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute

From a review by Charlotte J. Frisbie, American Indian Quarterly, May 1979: This volume represents the second effort by Indiana University to document music and oral data archival holdings, The first, compiled by Ruth M. Stone and Frank J. Gillis, focused on African Music and Oral Data (1976) and was worldwide in coverage. The present volume restricts itself to cataloguing Native North American music and oral data holdings in the University's Archives of Traditional Music in Bloomington. Compiled by Dorothy Sara Lee, a doctoral candidate specializing in Ethnomusicology in the Universith's Folklore Department, it utilizes, with slight modifications, the GLIB-SELIND computer program employed by Stone and Gillis and designed by Jean Nakhnikian.

[Lee 1984] Dorothy Sara Lee (editor). The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 8: Early Anthologies, Studies in American Folklife, Number 3, Volume 8, published by the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C., 1984, 92 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This catalog describes wax cylinder recordings of music collected by two pioneers in ethnomusicology. The 101 cylinders in the Benjamin Ives Gilman Collection recorded at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago contain Fijian, Samoan, Uvean, Javanese, Turkish, and Kwakiutl or Vancouver Island Indian music. The Gilman Collection is arranged by cultural group. A set of 120 cylinder copies compiled shortly after World War I by Erich Moritz von Hornbostel from ethnic and tribal music at the Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv offers music collected from 1900-1914 in 15 world geographic regions, including North America. The set is the first anthology of recordings of world music and contains some of the earliest recordings of "exotic" music. The Hornbostel Demonstration Collection is arranged by geographic region and includes an index by collector and by cultural group. Entries in each catalog list cylinder number, Archive of Folk Culture number, cylinder, collector's description of contents, performer, recording location and date, and notes containing technical information about sound quality. Bibliographies for both collections conclude the catalog. (LFL)

[LOC 2002] Library of Congress, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division. Emile Berliner and the Birth of the Recording Industry, published by the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., April 30, 2002, retrieved December 1, 2010. Emile Berliner and the Birth of the Recording Industry Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

Lead paragraph: Emile Berliner and the Birth of the Recording Industry is a selection of more than 400 items from the Emile Berliner Papers and 108 Berliner sound recordings from the Library of Congress's Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division. Berliner (1851-1929), an immigrant and a largely self-educated man, was responsible for the development of the microphone and the flat recording disc and gramophone player. Although the focus of this online collection is on the gramophone and its recordings, it includes much evidence of Berliner's other interests, such as information on his businesses, his crusades for the pasteurization of milk and other public-health issues, his philanthropy, his musical composition, and even his poetry. Spanning the years 1870 to 1956, the collection comprises correspondence, articles, lectures, speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, catalogs, clippings, experiment notes, and rare sound recordings.

[Mauchahty-Ware 1978] Tom Mauchahty-Ware. Flute Songs Of The Kiowa and Comanche, Taos, New Mexico, Indian House, IH 2512, 13 tracks, 1978, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Recorded at Hog Creek, Oklahoma on June 1, 1978. Includes liner notes by Tom Mauchahty-Ware and Tony Isaacs. Reissued in [Mauchahty-Ware 1995]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

26 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (13), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (13)

[Mauchahty-Ware 1989] Tom Mauchahty-Ware; Millard Clark and Paul Pahdocony (percussion); Sands-B (engineering and mixing); Carolyn McBride (photography). Sunrise — American Indian Flute, Moore, Oklahoma, Indian Sounds, IS-5051, 13 tracks, Released 1989, audio cassette. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

26 citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (13), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (13)

[Mauchahty-Ware 1995] Tom Mauchahty-Ware. Flute Songs Of The Kiowa and Comanche, Taos, New Mexico, Indian House, IH 2512, 13 tracks, Released September 29, 1995, UPC 7-04724-25122-8, ASIN B000008PY2, audio CD. Recorded at Hog Creek, Oklahoma on June 1, 1978. Includes liner notes by Tom Mauchahty-Ware and Tony Isaacs. Reissue of [Mauchahty-Ware 1978]. See the Indian House web site. Contains 13 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[McCullough 1938] Doriane Woolley McCullough (collector); José Juan, Isabelle Iske, Charles Whittman, Manuel Lowe, John Miles, Harvey Cawker, and Joseph Moffat (performers). [United States, Arizona, Sacaton, Pima Indians, 1938] [sound recording]/collected by Doriane Woolley McCullough. 268 sound discs: analog, 78 RPM, monophonic, 12-inch, with documentation. [United States, Arizona, Sacaton, Pima Indians, 1938] [sound recording] Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Indiana University Summary: Recorded by McCullough from July 16 to Oct. 13, 1938 at the Pima Indian Reservation in Sacaton, Arizona.
Pima songs and music.
Aluminum disc originals.
Accompanied by song texts in Pima with English translations, musical transcriptions, biographical information on informants, and correspondence between McCullough and George Herzog pertaining to the former's field work.
Indexed in Dorothy Sara Lee, Native North American Music and Oral Data (I.U. Press, 1979).

[Miyata 1991] Kōhachirō Miyata; David Lewiston (producer); David Loeb (liner notes). Shakuhachi — The Japanese Flute, Elektra Nonesuch Records, 9-72076-2, 5 tracks, May 14, 1991, total time 33:17, ASIN B000005IWN, Audio CD. First released in 1977 on an LP record (33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc) as Nonesuch H-72076. Contains 5 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Asia, Hon Shirabe - Sheet Music for Native American Flute (2)

Review by Bruno Deschênes on AllMusic.com: This CD is re-release of an LP issued in 1997 by Nonesuch. It is probably one of the most known and most sold shakuhachi records in the West. When one looks around for Japanese music, it may be the one found the most often. Kôhachiro Miyata is considered one of the leading shakuhachi players in Japan, along such musicians as Katsuya Yokoyama, Goro Yamaguchi, or Aoki Reibo, for example, as well as being an active composer of works for traditional Japanese instruments. On this CD, he presents us with five of the most known pieces of the Japanese honkyoku repertoire (honkyoku referring to solo pieces for shakuhachi). The one thing that strikes the most about Miyata's playing is the purity and quality of his sound. There are many different styles of playing the shakuhachi, some breathy, some more technical, some with particular playing techniques, generally according to the style of a particular school of playing. Miyata's style is natural, looking for a quality and purity of sound in each and every note. A must!

[Morris-S 1995] Sam Morris. The Nez Perce Music Archive: The Sam Morris Collection, published by the Northwest Interpretive Association, Seattle, Washington, 1995, set of audio CDs (two). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[NMAH 1992] Department of Public Programs, National Museum of American History (producer); Edward Wapp Wahpeconiah (liner notes). Music of New Mexico: Native American Traditions, Smithsonian / Folkways, CD SF 40408, 19 tracks, 1992, total time 67:36. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

[Olsen-L 1972] Loran Olsen. “Nez Perce Songs of Historical Significance, as Sung by Sol Webb”, published by the Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, 1972. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Olsen-L 1989] Loran Olsen. Guide to the Nez Perce Music Archive: An Annotated Listing of Songs and Musical Selections Spanning the Period 1897-1974, published by Washington State University, School of Music and Theatre Arts, Pullman, Washington, 1989, 40 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Olsen-L 1999] Loran Olsen. A Legacy from Sam Morris, published by the Northwest Interpretive Association, Seattle, Washington, 1999. Companion guide to [Morris-S 1995]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Olsen-L 2001] Loran Olsen. Qillóowawya: Hitting the Rawhide — Serenade Songs from the Nez Perce Musical Archive, published by the Northwest Interpretive Association, Seattle, Washington, 36 tracks, 2001, 38 pages, ISBN 0-914019-45-7 (978-0-914019-45-9), audio CD and booklet. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Rehding 2005] Alexander Rehding. “Wax Cylinder Revolutions”, The Musical Quarterly, Volume 88, Number 1, Spring 2005, pages 123–160, doi:10.1093/musqtl/gdi004 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Reinhard 1962] Kurt Reinhard. “The Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv”, The Folklore and Folk Music Archivist, Volume 5, Number 2, Summer 1962. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings

[Rhodes 1949] Willard Rhodes (recording and liner notes). Music of the Sioux and the Navajo, Ethnic Folkways Library, Folkways Records, EFL-1420 to EFL-1423, 15 tracks, 1949, ASIN B006P2RU50, four 10", 78 RPM vinylite discs (two black and two brown) in leatherette album folder box set, with notes. Reissued in [Rhodes 1949a], [Rhodes 1966], and [Rhodes 2004]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (2)

[Rhodes 1949a] Willard Rhodes (recording and liner notes). Music of the Sioux and the Navajo, Ethnic Folkways Library, Folkways Records, EFL-1401, 15 tracks, 1949, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc with 6-page booklet. Reissue of [Rhodes 1949]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Rhodes 1954b] Willard Rhodes (recording). Music of the American Indians: Sioux, Folk Music of the United States from the Archive of Folk-song, Volume 40, Library of Congress Music Division, AFS L40, 1954, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. See the American Folk Life Center, Folk Recordings web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

[Rhodes 1954c] Willard Rhodes (recording). Music of the American Indians: Plains: Comanche, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Caddo, Wichita, Pawnee, Folk Music of the United States from the Archive of Folk-song, Volume 39, Library of Congress Music Division, AFS L39, 1954, ASIN B004P0K7RW, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. See the American Folk Life Center, Folk Recordings web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3)

[Rhodes 1966] Willard Rhodes (recording and liner notes). Music of the Sioux and the Navajo, Ethnic Folkways Library, Folkways Records, FE 4401, 15 tracks, 1966, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Reissue of [Rhodes 1949]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Rhodes 1982] Willard Rhodes (recording). Music of the American Indians: Plains: Comanche, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Caddo, Wichita, Pawnee: From the Archive of Folk Culture, published by the Library of Congress, Motion picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division., Washington, D.C., 1982. Liner notes for [Rhodes 1954c] published in 1982. LCCN call number 82-743369. See the American Folk Life Center, Folk Recordings web page. Music of the American Indians: Plains: Comanche, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Caddo, Wichita, Pawnee Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3)

[Rhodes 1987] Willard Rhodes (recording). Music of the American Indians: Sioux: From the Archive of Folk Culture, published by the Library of Congress, Motion picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division., Washington, D.C., 1987, 20 pages. Liner notes for [Rhodes 1954b] published in 1987. LCCN call number 82-743370. See the American Folk Life Center, Folk Recordings web page. Music of the American Indians: Sioux Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4)

[Rhodes 2004] Willard Rhodes (recording and liner notes). Music of the Sioux and the Navajo, Smithsonian / Folkways, FW04401, 15 tracks, 2004, ASIN B000S98PRS, audio CD. Reissue of [Rhodes 1949]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically

[Robb 1979a] John Donald Robb. The J. D. Robb Collection of Folk Music: Melodies, in three volumes, 1979. Reproduced from manuscript. English and Spanish words. Transcribed by the compiler from his collection of recordings. Copies archived at the University of New Mexico, Center for Southwest Research and also the Fine Arts and Design Library call number ML156.4.F6 R6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Nine citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America (9)

[Robb 1979b] John Donald Robb. The J.D. Robb Collection of Folk Music Recordings: Song Texts, in three volumes, 1979. Reproduced from typescript. Text in Spanish and English. Copies archived at the University of New Mexico, Center for Southwest Research and also the Fine Arts and Design Library call number ML156.4.F6 R61. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Ross-WG 1984] W. Gillies Ross. “The Earliest Sound Recordings among North American Inuit”, Arctic, Volume 37, Number 3, Spetember 1984, pages 291–292, doi:10.14430/arctic2205 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: On 7 November 1903, Captain George Comer of the American whaling schooner Era recorded on a phonograph a few songs of the Aivilingmiut and Qaernermiut in northwestern Hudson Bay (Ross, 1984:73). These appear to have been the earliest sound recordings ever made among the Inuit of Canada and Alaska. The recordings made by Diamond Jenness among the Copper Eskimos (1914-1916) and those made by Christian Leden among the Padlimiut (1914-1916) have hitherto been considered as the earliest, but Comer's first recording preceded these by more than a decade and his pioneering work should be recognized.

[Sachs 1956] Curt Sachs (editor). Man's Early Musical Instruments, Ethnic Folkways Records, FE 4525, 1956. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Seeger 1987a] Anthony Seeger and Louise S. Spear (editors). Early Field Recordings: A Catalogue of Cylinder Collections at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music, published by Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 1987, 218 pages, ISBN 0-253-31840-8 (978-0-253-31840-4), hardcover. Publication earlyfieldrecord00indi on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Eight citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (3), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (3)

[Shiloah 1978] Amnon Shiloah (recording and liner notes). Beduin Music of Southern Sinai, Ethnic Folkways Records, FE 4204, 1978. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa

[Shostak 1982] Marjorie Shostak (recorder, producer; photographer); Nicholas M. England (recorder); Megan Biesele (recorder); Ronald Clyne (designer). Instrumental Music of the Kalahari San, Ethnic Folkways, FE-4315, 13 tracks, 1982, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc. Reissued in [Shostak 2004]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Thirteen citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (13)

[Shostak 2004] Marjorie Shostak (recorder, producer; photographer); Nicholas M. England (recorder); Megan Biesele (recorder); Ronald Clyne (designer). Instrumental Music of the Kalahari San, Smithsonian / Folkways, FW04315, 13 tracks, 2004, audio CD. Originally issued as Folkways Ethnic FE-4315. Reissue of [Shostak 1982]. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Rather than performing for an audience, the !Kung San people from the northwestern Kalahari Desert region "play [music] for themselves, when the mood strikes them." Perhaps that’s what makes it so compelling. Here is a demonstration of music played on gut pluriarc (bow lute), gut hunting bow and sitengena (thumb piano), with vocal accompaniment.

[Spear 1984] Louise S. Spear. “Cylinder Recordings from Carl Lumholtz' "Unknown Mexico"”, ReSOUND, Volume 3, Number 1, published by the Archives of Traditional Music, Indiana, January 1984. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America

[Spottswood 1976] Richard K. Spottswood (editor). Songs of Love, Courtship & Marriage, Folk Music in America Series, Volume 2, Library of Congress Music Division, LBC 2, 1976, ASIN B009UDIKGY, 33⅓ rpm 12" vinyl audio disc, monophonic. Recorded 1925-1964. LCCN call number 75-750855. See the American Folk Life Center, Folk Recordings web page Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (2)

[Steward 1933] Julian H. Steward. “Ethnography of the Owens Valley Paiute”, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, Volume 33, Number 3, published by the University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1933, pages 233–350. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Names of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

Preface: The following account of the ethnography of the Owens Valley Paiute is based on two visits of about six weeks each to Owens valley and Mono lake during the summers of 1927 and 1928 and a short visit in December, 1931. The first two trips were made under the auspices of the Department of Anthropology, University of California.

[Stone 1976] Ruth M. Stone and Frank J. Gillis. “African Music and Oral Data — A Catalog of Field Recordings, 1902-1975, Second Edition”, published by the University of Michigan, 1976, 412 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Stumpf 1892] Carl Stumpf. “Phonographierte Indianermelodien”, Vierteljahrschrift fur Musikwissenschaft, Volume 8, in German, 1892, pages 127–144. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Tailfeathers 2004] Olivia Tailfeathers. Ninihkssin, Arizona Recording Productions, March 22, 2004, UPC 778505121529, audio CD. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture

[Thomas-NW 1910] Northcote Withridge Thomas. Anthropological Report on the Edo-speaking Peoples of Nigeria, Harrison and Sons, London, 1910. Publication anthropologicalr00thom on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa

[Toop 2011] David Toop; Derek Wolmsey (host). Music from the Lost Worlds, Adventures in Modern Music, Resonance 104.4FM radio broadcast, October 20, 2011. Music from the Lost Worlds Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Turnbull 1992] Colin Turnbull and Francis S. Chapman (original recordings, compilation, and editing); Michelle Kisliuk (reissue compilation and editing); Alan Yoshida (remastering). Mbuti Pygmies of the Ituri Rainforest, Smithsonian / Folkways, CD SF 40401, 26 tracks, 1992. Originally issued as Folkways FE 4457 in 1957 and FE 4483 in 1958. See the Smithsonian / Folkways Recordings web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Africa (2)

Publisher's description: "Mbuti Pygmies of the Ituri Rainforest captures the variety and tonal quality of the solo and choral traditions present in Mbuti vocal music. Songs are primarily concerned with Mbuti's nomadic life and the forest, from which their lives and those of the animal kingdom are sustained. These prized recordings have been remastered and resequenced to reflect Dr. Turnbull's original mode: the recording begins in the forest with music associated with hunting and gathering, moves to the village for a Bantu initiation ritual, and finally returns to the forest for the Mbuti rituals. This record documents the music discussed in the book The Forest People, read by many anthropology classes."

[Weyer 1954] Edward M. Weyer, Jr. Music from Mato Grosso, Brazil, Ethnic Folkways Records, FE 4446, 1954. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of South America (2)

Publisher's description: "The very name "Mato Grosso," or "Thick Forest" as it means in Portuguese, epitomizes the unknown and the unexplored. In the present century this obscure Brazilian wilderness, situated almost in the geographical center of the South American continent, gained worldwide interest with the disappearance of Colonel Fawcet and his party in 1926. Even today, though it may be reached by plane from Rio de Janeiro in less than a day, Mato Grosso is only just beginning to become known to the civilized world. The Upper Xingú River, which is the area of Mato Grosso with which this album is mainly concerned, was first explored by Karl von den Steinen as recently as 1884, and the Chavante Indians were only just peacefully contacted by white men in 1946..."

[WSU A] Washington State University. Guide to the Loran Olsen Papers 1960-1993 — Cage 658, published by Washington State University, Pullman, Washington. Guide to the Loran Olsen Papers 1960-1993 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Summary: The papers of Loran Olsen are available in Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections (MASC) at the WSU Libraries. This collection includes materials related to the Nez Perce Music Archive project; it is open and available for use in MASC, in the Terrell Library at the WSU Pullman campus.

[WSU B] Washington State University. Guide to the Nez Perce Music Collection Fieldwork Materials 1988-1995 — Cage 636, published by Washington State University, Pullman, Washington. Guide to the Nez Perce Music Collection Fieldwork Materials 1988-1995 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

 
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