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Ethnomusicology References

This is a list of references related to Ethnomusicology cited throughout Flutopedia.

The references on this page are a sub-set of the complete list of Flutopedia references.

For information on the format and other details of these citations, see the main references page.

Ethnomusicology References

[Archabal 1977] Nina Marchetti Archabal. “Frances Densmore — Pioneer in the Study of American Indian Music”, contained in [Stuhler 1977], 1977, retrieved October 30, 2011. Frances Densmore Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Baker 1882] Theodore Baker. Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden «About the Music of the North American Wild», Doctoral dissertation – Universitat Leipzig, Germany, published by Druck vol Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig, in German, 1882, iv + 82 pages + plates, ASIN B004S3J18C, hardcover. Translated and reissued in [Baker 1976] On the Music of the North American Indians. Reissued in [Baker 1978] On the Music of the North American Indians. Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (3), The Development of Flutes in North America (3)

From [Stevenson-R 1973]: Although not widely reviewed when in 1882 Breitkopf und Härtel published Theodore Baker's Leipzig dissertation, Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden, it soon came to be widely accepted on both sides of the Atlantic as a definitive survey of the prior literature as well as a record of close personal research.

[Baker 1976] Theodore Baker; Ann Buckley (translation). On the Music of the North American Indians, published by Frits Knuf and W. S. Heinman, Buren, the Netherlands and New York, in English and German, 1976, vii + 151 pages, ASIN B0000E8P1T, softcover. [obtainable from] W. S. Heinman. Translation and reissue of [Baker 1882] Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden «About the Music of the North American Wild». On the Music of the North American Indians (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Baker 1977] Theodore Baker; Ann Buckley (translation). On the Music of the North American Indians, Source Materials and Studies in Ethnomusicology, Volume 9, published by Da Capo Press, New York, New York, in English, 1977, ISBN 0-306-70888-4 (978-0-306-70888-6). Translation and reissue of [Baker 1882] Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden «About the Music of the North American Wild». On the Music of the North American Indians (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Baker 1978] Theodore Baker; Ann Buckley (translation). On the Music of the North American Indians, published by the University of Maryland Sea Grant Publications, June 1978, softcover. Reissue of [Baker 1882] Über die Musik der Nordamerikanischen Wilden «About the Music of the North American Wild». On the Music of the North American Indians (another edition of this reference) Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Bakkegard 1960] B. M. Bakkegard. “Music in Arizona before 1912”, Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume 8, Number 2, published by MENC: The National Association for Music Education, Autumn 1960, pages 67–74. Publication 3344027 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Bancroft 1875a] Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, Volume 1 - Wild Tribes, published by D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1875, 797 pages. Publication cihm_14100 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Bancroft 1875b] Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, Volume 2 - Civilized Nations, published by D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1875, 805 pages. Publication cihm_14101 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Bancroft 1875c] Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, Volume 3 - Myths and Languages, published by D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1875, 796 pages. Publication cihm_14102 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Names of the Native American Flute

[Bancroft 1875d] Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, Volume 4 - Antiquities, published by D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1875, 807 pages. Publication nativeraces04bancrich on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Bancroft 1875e] Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, Volume 5 - Primitive History, published by D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1876, 796 pages. Publication cihm_14104 on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Bloechl 2008] Olivia Ashley Bloechl. Native American Song at the Frontiers of Early Modern Music, New Perspectives in Music History and Criticism, Volume 17, published by Cambridge University Press, 2008, 279 pages, ISBN 0-521-86605-7 (978-0-521-86605-7). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Olivia A. Bloechl reconceives the history of French and English music from the sixteenth through to the eighteenth century from the perspective of colonial history. She demonstrates how encounters with Native American music in the early years of colonization changed the course of European music history. Colonial wealth provided for sumptuous and elite musical display, and American musical practices, materials, and ideas fed Europeans' taste for exoticism, as in the masques, ballets, and operas discussed here. The gradual association of Native American song with derogatory stereotypes of musical 'savagery' pressed Europeans to distinguish their own music as civilized and rational. Drawing on evidence from a wide array of musical, linguistic, and visual sources, this book demonstrates that early American colonization shaped European music cultures in fundamental ways, and it offers a fresh, politically and transculturally informed approach to the study of music in the early colonial Atlantic world.

[Boas 1897] Franz Boas. “The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians — Based on Personal Observations and on Notes Made by Mr. George Hunt”, Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution and Report of the U. S. National Museum, Year Ending June 30, 1895, published by the Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1897, pages 311–738. Publication annualreportofbo1895smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Cringan 1898] Alexander T. Cringan. “Pagan Dance Songs of the Iroquois”, Annual Archaeological Report 1897-98, being part of Appendix to the Report of the Minister of Education, Ontario, Volume 12, published by L. K. C. Meron, Toronto, Ontario, 1898, pages 168–198. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Cringan 1903] Alexander T. Cringan. “Iroquois Folk Songs”, Annual Archaeological Report 1902, being part of Appendix to the Report of the Minister of Education, Ontario, Volume 17, published by L. K. C. Meron, Toronto, Ontario, 1903, pages 137–152. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1907a] Frances Densmore. “An Onondaga Thanksgiving Song”, The Indian School Journal, Volume 7, Number 8, published by the United States Indian Industrial and Agricultural School, Chilocco, Oklahoma, June 1907, pages 23–24. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1907c] Frances Densmore. “Songs of the Brown Children”, The Indian School Journal, Volume 8, Number 1, published by the United States Indian Industrial and Agricultural School, Chilocco, Oklahoma, November 1907, pages 17–19. alternate title shown on back cover: Songs of the Red Children. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1909] Frances Densmore. “Scale Formation in Primitive Music”, American Anthropologist, New Series, Volume 11, Number 1, published by the American Anthropological Association, Anthropological Society of Washington, Washington, D.C., January–March 1909, pages 1–12, ASIN B0008AUGJW. Scale Formation in Primitive Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Readings and Quotations on Silence

[Densmore 1910] Frances Densmore. Chippewa Music, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 45, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1910, 216 pages. Reissued in [Densmore 1995]. Publication chippewamusic01dens on Archive.org (open access). Contains 210 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Thirteen citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (5), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (4), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (4)

[Densmore 1913] Frances Densmore. Chippewa Music II, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 53, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1913, 341 pages. Publication chippewamusic02dens on Archive.org (open access). Contains 183 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seventeen citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (6), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically (5), Names of the Native American Flute, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture (5)

[Densmore 1916] Frances Densmore. “Music in its Relation to the Religious Thought of the Teton Sioux, Holmes Anniversary Volume”, contained in [Hodge 1916], 1916, pages 67–79. Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1918] Frances Densmore. Teton Sioux Music and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 61, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1918, 561 pages. Reissued in [Densmore 2001] and [Densmore 2006]. Publication tetonsioux00densmore on Archive.org (open access). Contains 252 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Names of the Native American Flute (2), Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (2)

[Densmore 1920] Frances Densmore. “Recent Developments in the Study of Indian Music”, The Etude, Volume 38, Number 10, October 1920, page 670. Contains 2 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1922] Frances Densmore. Northern Ute Music, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 75, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1922, 213 pages, ASIN B001PNV1FY, hardcover. Reissued in [Densmore 2006a], [Densmore 2007], and [Densmore 2009]. Publication northernutemusic00dens on Archive.org (open access). Contains 116 songs. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians, Names of the Native American Flute (2)

[Densmore 1923] Frances Densmore. Mandan and Hidatsa Music, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 80, published by the United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1923, 232 pages. Reissued in [Densmore 2006b]. Publication bulletin801923smit on Archive.org (open access). Contains 110 songs. Mandan and Hidatsa Music Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Fourteen citations: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks, The Flute and Flute Music of the North American Indians (3), Narratives of the Native American Flute (2), Origin of the Flageolet - Sheet Music for Native American Flute (2), Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized by Culture, Ethnographic Flute Recordings of North America - Organized Chronologically, Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (4)

Foreward: A phase of Indian life hitherto untouched by the present writer is shown in this work. The Mandan and Hidatsa lived in houses which were grouped in permanent villages, their environment differing essentially from that of the Chippewa and Sioux in their camps or the Ute in the fastnesses of the mountains. The music of the latter tribes has been analyzed in previous works and a comparative statement of results is presented in this volume.

The songs of the Mandan and Hidatsa were recorded on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota during the summers of 1912 and 1915, an additional trip being made in 1918 to complete the material. This research was suggested by Dr. O. J. Libby, secretary of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, and the first season's work was under the auspices of that society. The subsequent work was under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

[Densmore 1926] Frances Densmore. The American Indians and Their Music, First Edition, published by The Woman's Press, New York, 1926, 152 pages. Reissued in [Densmore 2003]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Five citations: Instrumental and Vocal Love Songs of the North American Indians (4), The Flute and Flute Music of the North American Indians

[Densmore 1926a] Frances Densmore. “Music of the Tule Indians of Panama”, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Volume 77, Number 11, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 16, 1926, 39 pages, retrieved March 24, 2011. Publication 2864. Publication smithsonianmisce771926smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Ethnographic Flute Recordings of Central America

Introduction: A remarkable opportunity for the study of primitive music was recently afforded by the presence of eight Tule Indians in Washington. These Indians were from the Isthmus of Darien in Panama and were brought to the United States by Mr. R. O. Marsh. The five adults in the group were of normal Indian color and the three children were fair, being examples of the "white Indians," whose occurrence among the Tule has caused the tribe to be known by that name. The Tule live on islands near the coast of the Caribbean Sea from San Bias Point to Armila, a distance of 120 miles. They also hold the San Bias Range of mountains on the mainland.

This study was done entirely with the adult members of the group during portions of November and December, 1924, and was made possible by the courtesy of Mr. Marsh. The work was under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution.

[Densmore 1931a] Frances Densmore. “Music of the Winnebago, Chippewa, and Pueblo Indians”, contained in [Smithsonian 1931], 1931, pages 217–224. Publication explorationsfiel193032smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1932c] Frances Densmore. “Recording Indian Music”, contained in [Smithsonian 1932], 1932, pages 183–190. Publication explorationsfiel193032smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Densmore 1933b] Frances Densmore. “Recording Seminole Songs in Florida”, contained in [Smithsonian 1933], 1933, pages 93–96. Publication explorationsfiel193032smit on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Faulkner-M 1984] Maurice Faulkner and Suzanne Faulkner. “The Drone Sound — A Basis for Cult and Emotional Activities in Primitive Societies: A Possibility for the Use of the Bronze Lur”, Issue 53, Volume 2, of Kungl. Musikaliska akademiens skriftserie, Cajsa S. Lund (editor), Second Conference of the International Council for Tradition Music (ICTM) Study Group on Music Archaeology, Stockholm, Sweden, November 19–23, 1984, published by Kungl. Musikaliska akademien, 1984, pages 217–223. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Description by Frances Palmer: This paper suggests that the lur may have had a similar function to that of the didjeridu in providing a drone accompaniment to ceremonial functions and songs.

[Fletcher 1916] Alice C. Fletcher. “A Birthday Wish from Native America”, Extract from the Holmes Anniversary Volume, 1916, pags 118–122. Publication birthdaywishfrom00flet on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gibbs-G 1856] George Gibbs; John J. Milhau, Silvester Mowry, and Olive Oatman (contributors). Observations on the Indians of the Colorado River, California; Accompanying Vocabularies of the Yuma and Mohave tribes, Manuscript 1043, published by the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, 1856, 22 pages. Gibbs states that his paper is based on data received from Milhau and Mowry; the latter in turn obtained data from Olive Oatman, Apache captive, 1851-55. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: A Brief History of the Native American Flute, The Development of Flutes in North America

[Giglio 1994] Virginia Giglio. Southern Cheyenne Women's Songs, published by the University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1994, 272 pages, ISBN 0-8061-2605-1 (978-0-8061-2605-0), hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Gray 1996] Judith A. Gray. “Returning Music to the Makers: The Library of Congress, American Indians, and the Federal Cylinder Project”, Cultural Survival Quarterly, Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 1996. Returning Music to the Makers Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Ethnographic and Reference Flute Recordings (3), A Brief History of the Native American Flute

Lead paragraph: The United States Library of Congress houses the country's largest collection of early recordings of American Indian music, recorded originally on wax cylinders and today also preserved on high quality audio tape. The Archive of Folk Culture now includes approximately 10,000 cylinder recordings from private individuals and from other agencies of the U.S. government. Especially important among the latter were the materials assembled by the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology. Of the 10,000 cylinders, nearly 8,000 document the sung and spoken traditions of American Indian communities. Among them were the earliest known field recordings - Passamaquoddy songs and narratives by Noel Josephs and Peter Selmore, recorded by Jesse Walter Fewkes in Calais, Maine, in March 1890. They had been transferred to the Library by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University.

[Greene-PD 2003] Paul D. Greene. “Ordering a Sacred Terrain: Melodic Pathways of Himalayan Flute Pilgrimage”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 47, Number 2, Spring–Summer 2003, pages 205–227. Publication 3113918 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hall-JC 1955] Jody C. Hall and Bruno Nettl. “Musical Style of the Modoc”, Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, Volume 11, Number 1, Spring 1955, pages 58–66. Publication 3628997 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Heth 1979a] Charlotte Heth. “Stylistic Similarities in Cherokee and Iroquois Music”, Journal of Cherokee Studies, Volume 4, 1979, pages 128–162. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hodge 1916] F. W. {Frederick Webb} Hodge (editor). Anthropological Essays Presented to William Henry Holmes, printed by the J. W. Bryan Press, Washington, D.C., 1916, 499 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Keeling 1989] Richard Keeling (editor). Women in North American Indian Music: Six Essays, Special Monograph 6, published by the Society for Ethnomusicology, Bloomington, Indiana, 1989. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Keeling 1989a] Richard Keeling. “Musical Evidence of Female Spiritual Life Among the Yurok”, contained in [Keeling 1989], 1989, pages 67–78. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Keeling 1992a] Richard Keeling. “Music and Culture History among the Yurok and Neighboring Tribes of Northwestern California”, Journal of Anthropological Research, Volume 48, Number 1, Spring 1992, pages 25–48. Publication 3630607 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: As George Herzog (1935) once observed, repertories of Indian music are not typically homogeneous, but rather they usually contain "foreign elements" and "survivals" as well as songs in the predominant style. This presents serious difficulties for the generalist who seeks to define the music of a give tribe or culture are in unambiguous terms, but it also suggests interesting possibilities for the scholar who takes a historical approach. This study isolates the various "strains" or substyles in a large corpus of recordings collected among the Yurok, Hupa, and Karok Indians between 1900 and 1980 and speculates on what each seems to represent in terms of local culture history and in the broader sphere of North American Indian music. Besides what it accomplishes from an interpretive perspective, this paper demonstrates the shortcomings in our standard (synchronic) approach to Indian music and proposes a diachronic model for future comparative studies.

[Kurosawa 1952] Takatomo Kurosawa. “The Musical Bow of the Bununs Tribe in Formosa and Suggestions as to the Origin of the Pentatonic Scale”, Toyo Ongaku Kenkyu (Journal of the Society for Research in Asiatic Music), Volume 10–11, Tokyo, 1952, pages 18–32. title sometimes shown as 'The musical bow of the Vunun tribe in Formosa and suggestion as to the origin of the pentatonic scale'. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Manuel 1995] Peter Manuel. “New Perspectives in American Ethnomusicology”, Revista Transcultural de Música / Transcultural Music Review, Number 1, in Spanish and English, June 1995, retrieved December 19, 2010. ISSN:1697-0101. New Perspectives in American Ethnomusicology Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Montagu 2005] Jeremy Montagu. On the Measurement of the Musical Scales of Various Nations and Introducting the Ellis, 2005, 5 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Myers 1993] Helen Myers. Ethnomusicology: Historical and Regional Studies, Volume 2 of The Norton/Grove handbooks in music, Volume 2 of Ethnomusicology, published by W. W. Norton & Company, 1993, 541 pages, ISBN 0-393-03378-3 (978-0-393-03378-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Complementing Ethnomusicology: An Introduction, this volume of studies, written by world-acknowledged authorities, places the subject of ethnomusicology in historical and geographical perspective. Part I deals with the intellectual trends that contributed to the birth of the discipline in the period before World War II. Organized by national schools of scholarship, the influence of 19th-century anthropological theories on the new field of "comparative musicology" is described. In the second half of the book, regional experts provide detailed reviews by geographical areas of the current state of ethnomusicological research.

[Nettl 1956] Bruno Nettl. Music in Primitive Culture, Second Edition, published by Harvard University Press, December 1956, 200 pages, ISBN 0-674-59000-7 (978-0-674-59000-7). Contains 1 song. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Comprehensive Scale Catalog: Three-Tone Scales in Equal Temperament

Introduction: In many parts of the world today there are people who are conventionally called primitive. They have simple cultures with no system of reading and writing of their own, although they usually possess some kind of tribal organization. It is their music which we shall examine here. This book is devoted to a description of the place of music in their lives, to their musical styles, instruments, and history, and to the relationship of primitive music to the music of Western culture.

[Nettl 1995] Bruno Nettl. “The Seminal Eighties: A North American Perspective of the Beginnings of Musicology and Ethnomusicology”, Revista Transcultural de Música / Transcultural Music Review, Number 1, in Spanish and English, June 1995, retrieved December 19, 2010. ISSN:1697-0101. The Seminal Eighties Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Paige 1970] Harry W. Paige. Songs of the Teton Sioux, First edition, published by Westernlore Press, Los Angeles, California, 1970, 195 pages, ASIN B001R1IO4U, hardcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: The beautiful and mysterious song of the Sioux is a carefully crafted and highly individualized ritual performed to invoke the strength of the spirits in order to harness the power of nature. In this, the first literary study of a fascinating tradition, Dr. Harry W. Paige immerses himself in the Sioux society and culture to unlock the mystery of this enchanting ritual. Passionate and intoxicating, The Songs of The Teton Sioux will astound and fascinate scholar and casual reader alike. The voice of their people may be fading, but the powerful songs of the Sioux will live on forever.

[Picken 1959] Laurence Picken. “Twelve Ritual Melodies of the T'ang Dynasty”, contained in [Rajeczky 1959], 1959, pages 145–171, retrieved April 11, 2011. Publication stdiamemoriaebel000107mbp on Archive.org (open access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Description from [Rust 1996]: A transcription of 12 ritual melodies of the 12th century from pitch pipe and flute notations.

[Porter-J 1995] James Porter. “New Perspectives in Ethnomusicology: A Critical Survey”, Revista Transcultural de Música / Transcultural Music Review, Number 1, in Spanish and English, June 1995, retrieved December 19, 2010. ISSN:1697-0101. New Perspectives in Ethnomusicology Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Provine 1974] Robert C. Provine, Jr. “The Treatise on Ceremonial Music (1430) in the Annals of the Korean King Sejong”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 18, Number 1, January 1974, pages 1–29. Publication 850057 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Rhodes 1956] Willard Rhodes. “Toward a Definition of Ethnomusicology”, American Anthropologist, Volume 58, Number 3, June 1956, pages 457–463, doi:10.1525/aa.1956.58.3.02a00050. Publication 665277 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Roberts-HH 1919] Helen H. {Heffron} Roberts. Primitive Music, 1919. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Roberts-HH 1926] Helen H. {Heffron} Roberts. Ancient Hawaiian Music, Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Bulletin 29, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1926. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Roberts-HH 1932] Helen H. {Heffron} Roberts. “Musical Composition and Scale Foundations in Primitive Music”, American Anthropologist, Volume 34, 1932, pages 79–107. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From [Keeling 1997]: Takes issue with those who analyze the tonal "systems" of Indian music and argues that this represents a projection of our (western) compositional bias. Roberts states that in the absence of formulated music theory, these derived tonal materials are not really scales at all (in our sense of the word) and tend to be numerous and varied in any group. Any objective understanding of melodic development and intervallic relationships is difficult, according to Roberts, and broad classifications such as "pentatonic" have little value.

[Roberts-HH 1933a] Helen H. {Heffron} Roberts. “The Pattern Phenomenon in Primitive Music”, Zietschrift für vergleichende Musikwiessenschaft, Volume 1, published by Mas Hesses Verlag, 1933, pages 49–52. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

From [Keeling 1997]: Discusses the tendency for songs of a given ceremonial complex to develop characteristic structural patterns that are basically independent of melodic content. Includes musical examples from the Pawnee (4 songs), Iroquois (2)m and Nootka (1).

[Rust 1996] Ezra Gardner Rust. The Music and Dance of the World's Religions: A Comprehensive, Annotated Bibliography of Materials in the English language, published by the Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996, 476 pages, ISBN 0-313-29561-1 (978-0-313-29561-4). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Despite the world-wide association of music and dance with religion, this is the first full-length study of the subject from a global perspective. The work consists of 3,816 references divided among 37 chapters. It covers tribal, regional, and global religions and such subjects as shamanism, liturgical dance, healing, and the relationship of music, mathematics, and mysticism. The referenced materials display such diverse approaches as analysis of music and dance, description of context, direct experience, observation, and speculation. The references address topics from such disciplines as sociology, anthropology, history, linguistics, musicology, ethnomusicology, theology, medicine, semiotics, and computer technology. Chapter 1 consists of general references to religious music and dance. The remaining 36 chapters are organized according to major geographical areas. Most chapters begin with general reference works and bibliographies, then continue with topics specific to the region or religion. This book will be of use to anyone with an interest in music, dance, religion, or culture.

[Sapir A] Edward Sapir; Jacob D. Sapir (transcriptions). Unpublished Manuscript on Southern Paiute Music with Transcriptions Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Schrag 2005] Brian Edward Schrag. How Bamiléké Music-Makers Create Culture in Cameroon, Doctoral dissertation – University of California, Los Angeles, 2005, 320 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Shaw-AM 1926] Anna Moore Shaw. “Songs of the Indians”, American Mercury, Volume 7, 1926, pages 65–68. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Stevenson-R 1973] Robert Stevenson. “Written Sources for Indian Music until 1882”, Ethnomusicology, Volume 17, Number 1, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of Society for Ethnomusicology, January 1973, pages 1–40. Publication 850094 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Development of Flutes in North America

[Stuhler 1977] Barbara Stuhler and Gretchen V. Kreuter (editors). Women of Minnesota, Selected Biographical Essays, First Edition, published by Minnesota Historical Society Press, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 1977. Reissue of [Stuhler 1998]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Stuhler 1998] Barbara Stuhler and Gretchen V. Kreuter. Women of Minnesota: Selected Biographical Essays, Second edition, published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1998, 467 pages, ISBN 0-87351-367-3 (978-0-87351-367-8). Reissued in [Stuhler 1977]. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Teit 1916] James A. Teit. Songs and Notes Recorded in Ottawa by J.A. Teit. Singer, Chief John Tetlenitsa. Canadian Ethnology Service, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Ottawa, Ontario, Canadian Ethnology Service, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Ottawa, Ontario, 1921. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Teit 1921] James A. Teit. Unpublished Field Collection: Songs and Notes Recorded in Spence's Bridge, B.C., Canadian Ethnology Service, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Ottawa, Ontario, 1921. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Wickwire 1988] Wendy C. Wickwire. “James A. Teit: His Contribution to Canadian Ethnomusicology”, The Canadian Journal of Native Studies, Volume 8, Number 2, 1988, pages 183–204. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: James A. Teit is well-known for his many contributions to the ethnography of the British Columbia interior Indians published between 1896 and 1930. Few are aware, however, of his very extensive collections of music recordings from these same people. Now housed primarily in Ottawa, these cylinders are complemented by detailed notes providing rich background material to this valuable collection.
Translation: James A. Teit est bien connu pour ses nombreux articles publiés entre 1896 et 1930 sur l'ethnographie des autochtones de l'intérieur de la Colombie britannique. Mais très peu de gens connaissent, cependant, ses vastes collections de musique enregistrée de ces mêmes autochtones. Gardés maintenant principalement à Ottawa, ces cylindres sont parachevés par des notes détaillées qui fournissent du matériel magnifique de l'arrièreplan à cette collection de valeur.

[Will 1999] Udo Will. “La baguette magique d’ethnomusicologie: Re-penser la notation et lanalyse de la musique «The Magic Wand of Ethnomusicology: Re-thinking the Notation and Analysis of Music»”, Cahiers de Musiques Traditionelles, Volume 12, Georg, Genève, in French, 1999, pages 9–34. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Will 1999a] Udo Will. The Magic Wand of Ethnomusicology: Re-thinking Notation and its Application in Music Analyses, English translation of [Will 1999], 1999. The Magic Wand of Ethnomusicology Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: One of the striking features of music and speech, in fact of all sound events, is their behavior in time, their evanescence: they are gone the moment we perceive them, with nothing left but fainting memory traces. Repeated exposure and training may help to recognize, recall, and even reproduce them. It remains immensely difficult to ‘talk about’ them - oral cultures have no music theory. Things seem to be different in literate cultures, though. Through the very invention of writing systems man has acquired means to cope with the elusiveness of sounds: the transformation from an aural-temporal form into a visual-spatial one. Sounds seems to be tamed and time seems more under control if treated spatially, however, this is only seemingly so because the accomplishments of such a transformation are limited and can at times be deceiving. Nevertheless, once invented, writing systems create their own momentum for further development and dissemination of the way they are applied and how man ‘thinks with’ and ‘thinks about’ them. Invented for mnemonic and communicative purposes they were also to be used, sooner or later, to record and communicate aspects of musical practices. In the succession of essential changes and new developments of the writing system following the Greek invention of alphabetic writing we also see the emergence of new notational systems for music in the Occident, which after a long development came to be a major shaping force for western music. Considering the central role that music writing plays in western music, it is no wonder, that notation became an important object of musicological research, the scientific inquiries into the world of music. Moreover, as notation was thought to represent music, inferences about music on the basis of the written form turned into a central methodological approach in musicology as well as in one of its later off-springs, comparative musicology.

 
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