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Crafting References

This is a list of flute-crafting references cited throughout Flutopedia.

The references on this page are a sub-set of the complete list of Flutopedia references.

For information on the format and other details of these citations, see the main references page.

Flute-Crafting References

[Baker-WL 1972] Whiteford L. Baker. Eastern Forest Insects, Miscellaneous Publication Number 1175, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, February 1972, 642 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

[Barclay 1997] R. L. Barclay (editor). The Care of Historic Musical Instruments, published by CCI, MGC and CIMCIM, 1997, vi + 145 pages, ISBN 0-660-17116-3. See the CIMCIM web site. The Care of Historic Musical Instruments Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Roster of Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Sites Related to the Native American Flute, Crafting Native American Flutes

Description by the publisher: CIMCIM is a co-publisher of the new book THE CARE OF HISTORIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, edited by Robert L. Barclay. This important book is published by the Canadian Conservation Institute, The Museums and Galleries Commission (UK), and CIMCIM.

Topics covered include: ethics and the use of heritage musical instruments, whether they are in the possession of individuals, private collectors, or museums; materials; basic conservation treatments; maintenance strategies; and documentation. The book includes a bibliography and details of the resources, advice, and support available to the custodians of collections.

Written by seven international specialists in the care and preservation of historic musical instruments: Robert L. Barclay, May Cassar, Friedemann Hellwig, Cary Karp, Arnold Myers, Scott Odell, and Mimi Waitzman.

[Bauman 1995] Carl Bauman; David Moretti (plans). “Courting Flute — An Instrumental Tie to an Old Native American Tradition”, Woodworker's Journal, Volume 19, Number 2, March/April 1995, pages 44–47. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

EBSCO Host description: Details the design and construction of a flute by woodworker David Moretti. Instrumental tie to an old native American tradition; Materials used. INSETS: Pro tip.; Playing your courting flute

[Benito 2011] Carlos García Benito. “Methodology for the Reconstruction of Prehistoric Aerophones Made of Hard Animal Material, Volume 1”, Actas das IV Jornadas de Jovens em Investigação Arqueológica (JIA 2011), Campus de Cambelas, Universidate do Algarve, Portugal, May 11–13, 2011, published by Tipografia Tavirense, 2011, pages 411–416, ISBN-13 978-989-97666-2-4. Methodology for the Reconstruction of Prehistoric Aerophones Made of Hard Animal Material Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: One of the main problems faced by Music Archaeology is the identification, definition and classification of music in the archaeological record. Several scholars have tried to provide different solutions: Lund (1981), Coumont (2002) and d'Errico & Lawson (2006). Significantly, all suggest the need to use Experimental Archaeology for its empirical reconstruction. This paper proposes a methodology to reconstruct and experimentally replicate prehistoric aerophones made from hard animal material -bone, antler or shell- (but extensible to other types of musical instruments). The application of Experimental Archaeology will help solve many problems inherent to this field of study. An experimentally conscious program, with clear and rigorous objectives, will test hypotheses through experimental reconstruction. The aim is to discern whether certain archaeological remains are musical instruments or not, but also to determine the exact morphology of these (because many finds are fragmentary), their manufacturing process, and to identify their acoustic possibilities. Furthermore, this study will be accompanied by a preliminary morpho-technological study of the handled remains. After the experimentation phase, data is to be correlated with associated archaeological contexts, as well as with other archaeological, historical or ethnographic examples.

[Bergman 2010] Richard Bergman, Zhiyong Cai, Charlie G. Carll, Mark A. Dietenberger, Robert H. Falk, Charles R. Frihart, Samuel V. Glass, Christopher G. Hunt, Rebecca E. Ibach, David E. Kretschmann, Stan T. Lebow, Douglas R. Rammer, Robert J. Ross, Nicole M. Stark, James P. Wacker, Xiping Wang, Robert H. White, Alex C. Wiedenhoeft, Michael C. Wiemann, and Samuel L. Zelinka. Wood Handbook — Wood as an Engineering Material, Centennial Edition, General Technical Report FPL-GTR-190, published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, April 2010, 508 pages. See the Forest Products Laboratory web site. Wood Handbook Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Three citations: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave, FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes (2)

Abstract: Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

[Birkett 2002] Stephen Birkett and Paul Poletti. “Reproduction of Authentic Historical Soft Iron Wire for Musical Instruments”, Instruments a claviers – expressivite et flexibilite sonore, Proceedings of the 2002 Harmoniques Conference, Lausanne, Switzerland, editors: Peter Lang, 2002. Reproduction of Authentic Historical Soft Iron Wire for Musical Instruments Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Burns 1990] Russell M. Burns and Barbara H. Honkala (technical coordinators). Silvics of North America, Volume 1: Conifers; Volume 2: Hardwoods, Agriculture Handbook 654, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1990, 877 pages. Silvics of North America Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

Abstract: The total environment of a tree is a complex integration of physical and biological elements. The physical elements are related to climate and soil and include radiation, precipitation, and the movement and composition of air; as well as the texture of the soil and its structure, depth, moisture capacity, drainage, nutrient content, and topographic position. Biological elements are the plant associates; the larger animals that use the forest as a source of food and shelter; the many small animals, insects, and insectuke animals; the fungi to which the trees are hosts; and the microorganisms in the soil.

[Cassens 1995] Daniel L. Cassens. “Some Important Indiana Hardwoods — Their Characteristics and Uses, Revised edition”, Forestry and Natural Resources, Marketing and Utilization, FNR 27, published by Purdue University, Cooperative Extension Service, April 1995, ASIN B0006YDHIW Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

[Edfors 1996] John Edfors. Woodwind Instruments from PVC — Guidelines for Constructing Experimental Woodwind Instruments from PVC Pipe & Related Materials, First Edition, 1996, 80 pages, ASIN B0006QPAHG Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Edfors A] John Edfors. Woodwind Instruments from PVC — Guidelines for Constructing Experimental Woodwind Instruments from PVC Pipe & Related Materials, Updated and Expanded Edition, 122 pages. Catalog number CM-15. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Here are a host of techniques and solutions applicable to the challenging endeavor of building woodwind instruments from over-the-counter PVC plumbing products and other readily available materials. They originate from the author's workshop notes based on actual instruments he has made, historical artifacts created by him, hand sketches and CAD drawings. This work involves various types and sizes of flutes, both with and without keys. These are proven techniques which are very practical to the maker of conventional and experimental musical instruments.

Chapters in this volume cover a wide variety of techniques used in the flute making process, shop requirements, work shop safety, designing the instrument, joint design, bending PVC pipe, tapered and enlarged bores, outside finish, drilling holes, press fits, hand shearing metals, fitting-up and regulating key mechanisms, marking and layout, tuning hints and an evaluation of different plastics for use in construction.

Six sample projects are presented complete with diagrams and specifications. They include the Renaissance Flute in G, Bb Military Fife, Three-Way Instrument, Irish Flute, Native North American Indian Love Flute and the 4-Keyed Flute. Richly illustrated with drawing, photos and CAD layouts complete with specifications. Appendices provide a list of suppliers, description of common pipe materials and bibliography. New updated and expanded edition.

[Edfors B] John Edfors. Folk Woodwinds from PVC, 37 pages. Catalog number CM-27. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This is second in a new series by the author on making instruments from PVC plumbing products and other commonly available materials. It is dedicated to guiding the individual with enthusiasm and some handiness with tools but only a minimally equipped workshop. It helps the reader set up a shop in practically any environment and selects the necessary tools and materials.

The text, richly supported by photos and clear, three-dimensional illustrations, takes the reader through the basic techniques, then through a series of plans for high quality, well-playing, folk woodwinds. The techniques include shop safety, marking and layout, drilling, finishing of tone holes, fine tuning, outside finishing operations, and many others. These proven plans are for highly popular folk instruments, such as renaissance flutes, kena, military fife, "backpack flute", pennywhistles, panpipe, folk clarinet, and renaissance cornemuse. Interspersed with the technical data are tutorials on how to play the various instruments. Included with this are the fingering charts and sample tunes.

Spiral bound with durable clear plastic covers to lay flat and withstand workshop wear and tear.

[Edfors C] John Edfors. Vintage Flutes from PVC, 39 pages. Catalog number CM-27. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Make great flutes with minimal workshop and entry level skills. Here is a comprehensive and detailed approach to making simple flutes from PVC plumbing products and other readily available materials.

The focus is on hand methods where a complete workshop is not available to the builder. The book helps the beginner in the craft set up the minimum workshop. It then takes her or him through all the steps necessary to complete a project, including key making. Besides a host of techniques, the many plans enable the enthusiast to progress from a simple one-section flute to multi-keyed flutes in two or three sections.

In addition, there is reference material and instruction that enable the reader to design and build flutes with many features not covered in the plans, including flutes of different sizes. The author provides both photos and clear, three-dimensional illustrations to demonstrate the techniques. These computer-generated drawings derive from actual models proven out in the author's workshop.

Intermingled with the technical presentation, there is a tutorial on how to play the flutes created by the enthusiast. This includes fingering charts and sample tunes. Spiral bound with durable clear plastic covers to lay flat and withstand workshop wear and tear.

[Fitch-JM 1990] James Marston Fitch. Historic Preservation: Curatorial Management of the Built World, Reprint Edition, published by the University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, North Carolina, 1990, 433 pages, ISBN 0-8139-1272-5 (978-0-8139-1272-1). Originally published by McGraw-Hill in 1982. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Review: This book outlines a complete programme for the restoration and preservation of historic structures and historic sites throughout the world. It is a basic text for both the novice entering the field and the specialist. Dr Fitch covers the many disciplines, concepts and technologies needed by the preservationist. He also includes discussions of the economic, legal and legislative forces acting upon historic district planning. He provides useful information on how old buildings can be moved (either intact or disassembled) to new sites via truck, rail or barge; how to heat, cool and light old buildings and still maintain the aesthetic integrity of their interiors; and how a country can develop a comprehensive policy for the care of its artistic and historic heritage.

[Gage 2001] Bruce Gage. “The Making of Native American Style Flutes”, The Woodwind Quarterly, Number 22, 2001, pages 53–62. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: How to Tie the Block on a Native American Flute (2)

[Gilman-EF 1993] Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson. Acer negundo Boxelder, Fact Sheet ST-20, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, November 1993, 4 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

[Gonzato 2015] Guido Gonzato. The "Low-Tech" Whistle: How to Make a Fine PVC Whistle, November 23, 2015, 33 pages. See the GG Whistles web site. The "Low-Tech" Whistle Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Flutopedia Revision History, Flute Crafting Dimensions (3)

[Goss-WP 1992] W. P. Goss and R. G. Miller. “Thermal Properties of Wood and Wood Products”, Proceedings of the Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Whole Buildings International Conference, 1992, Paper 28, 1992, 12 pages, ISBN 0-910110-93-X. Thermal Properties of Wood and Wood Products Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

Abstract: This paper presents the methods used to arrive at the revised thermal properties of wood included in Table 4, Chapter 22, 1989 ASHRAE Handbook-Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1989). The procedures used to determine the specific heat, range of densities, and range of thermal conductivities of wood species generally used in building construction are presented. The rationale was to use the wood thermal property data available in publications (handbooks, journals, transactions, proceedings), from wood associations, and from new experimental data to determine the thermal properties of wood species not listed in previous editions of the Handbook. The moisture content is assumed to be 12%, which is considered the average for woods in service in buildings in the United States. This tends to give somewhat conservative values for the thermal resistance of wood but is probably more realistic than the two wood thermal resistances that appeared in the 1981 Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1981). The paper also documents the changes made in the building board section of the 1989 Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1989) and repm ts a set of test results for oven-dried waferboard.

[Hermann 2004b] Henry R. Hermann. “To Seal or Not to Seal the Slow Air Chamber and Flue”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 3–6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Hopkin 1996] Bart Hopkin. Musical Instrument Design: Practical Information for Instrument Makers, published by See Sharp Press, 181 pages, ISBN 1-884365-08-6 (978-1-884365-08-9). Catalog number CM-16. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This encyclopedic, extensively illustrated book provides the information necessary to explore the world of musical instrument design and construction. While newcomers will appreciate its practical, hands-on approach and friendly tone, those with an established interest in instrument making will find it equally valuable. No other single resource contains the theoretical and practical information found in this volume. Chapters on flute-making and wind instrument design are worth the price of the entire book.

[Hughes 2014] Bill Hughes. Bore Routing Safety Jig, 2014, retrieved August 25, 2014. Bore Routing Safety Jig Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

[Hunt 1954] Walter Ben Hunt. The Golden Book of Indian Crafts and Lore, published by Simon and Schuster, 1954, 111 pages, ASIN B0006ATY4C Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flutopedia Image Detail: Walter Ben Hunt's Plans, Plans for Making Native American Flutes

[Hunt 1973] Walter Ben Hunt. The Complete How-To Book of Indiancraft: 68 Projects for Authentic Indian Articles from Tepee to Tom-tom, published by Collier Books, New York, 1973, 192 pages, ISBN 0-02-011690-X (978-0-02-011690-5). first published in 1969 under the title "Ben Hunt's Big Indiancraft Book". Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Plans for Making Native American Flutes

[Kelischek B] George Kelischek. Plans for Building Native American Flutes. Designs are available for three sizes of instruments in diatonic & modal scales: Soprano (Key of D) CP-1, Tenor (Key of D) CP-2, and Alto (Key of G) CP-3. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Here are full-scale (1:1) plans for construction of the two-chambered Native American Flute. They are precision-drawn diagrams complete with detailed specifications for the flute body, bore, mouthpiece and block. These plans take the guess-work out of constructing your Native American flute.

[Lacroix A] Lee Lacroix. Crafting Your Own Native American Flute, total time 60 minutes, video DVD. Catalog number CM-26V. See the Shakuhachi.com web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Crafting Your Own Native American Flute will allow you to know the pure joy of working with beautiful wood and of crafting your own flute. You will play with the knowledge that you alone made this beautiful instrument. To play is to know the peaceful and quieting feelings much like those found in meditation.

This new 60 minute DVD video now makes it possible for anyone to craft their own Native American flute. The flute is traditionally crafted, double-chambered, and six hole, typical of the plains flute. It is native tuned and excellent for those new to Native American music as well as those who haven't yet experienced this type of flute. Like those of the original Americans, this instrument is meant to be played solo. It includes techniques that show the novice woodworker, as well as the accomplished artisan how to build this flute. It shows how to perform each operation using hand tools, as well as the same task using some power tools. Each step in construction is shown. It shows how to craft the barrel and how to craft the fetish figure with tips on how to design and make your own fetish or power animal. Each video comes with a full scale dimensioned drawing as an aid in construction.

[Luley 2009] Christopher J. Luley, David J. Nowak, and Eric J. Greenfield. “Frequency and Severity of Trunk Decay in Street Tree Maples in Four New York Cities”, Arboriculture & Urban Forestry, Volume 35, Number 2, 2009, pages 94–99. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Anasazi Flutes from the Broken Flute Cave

Abstract: A proportional random selection of street tree Norway, silver, and sugar maples, and other species among four diameter classes were surveyed in the U.S.’ New York cities of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse for decay incidence and severity. Decay was determined by drilling sampled trees with a Resistograph and calculating the ratio of sound wood to radius. Overall, 58.3% of the sampled trees had some amount of decay and incidence was highest in sugar maples and in the largest size class trees. However, decay incidence was high (53.2%) even in the smallest diameter tree size class (30.5–45.7cm (12–18 in). Decay severity was greatest in silver maple and in the largest diameter trees, although only 3.2% of the trees sampled had serious decay. The study shows that decay is common in street trees but is seldom severe. It also suggests that decay becomes established early in the life of street trees but is most severe in larger diameter trees and in trees that compartmentalize decay poorly such as silver maple. The frequency and severity of decay in the cities studied indicates that they need to continue to identify and manage trees with decay.

[Price 1990] Lew Paxton Price. Native North American Flutes, 1990, ISBN 0-917578-07-4, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Names of the Native American Flute, A Brief History of the Native American Flute, Flute Makers' Forum, FAQ for the Native American Flute

Author's description: This is a small book on the flutes of the North American Indian, covering such things as their flute types, uses, evolution, religious connotations, etc. Original work, representing a year's research by a flutemaker/mathematician.

[Price 1991] Lew Paxton Price. Secrets of the Flute, 1991, ISBN 0-917578-08-2, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Six citations: NAFlutomat - Native American Flute Design Tool, Flute Makers' Forum, Crafting Native American Flutes, NAFlutomat - Native American Flute Design Tool, Flute and Sound Calculators on Flutopedia, Acoustic Length of a Flute

Author's description: Covers the physics, math, and design of non-mechanical flutes and the non-mechanical part of mechanical flutes. This is original work and the subject material is not available from other sources at this time. It is ideal for the teaching of the musical science of flutes and other woodwinds, for use by professional flute designers, and for hobbyists.

[Price 1994] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using the Native American Love Flute, Love Flutes Series, Book 1, published by L. P. Price, P.O. Box 88, Garden Valley, CA 95633, 1994, 46 pages, ISBN 0-917578-09-0, softcover. Library of Congress call number ML990.C68 P75 1994. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Names of the Native American Flute, Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: Tells how to design, craft, play, and pray the Native American Love Flutes of the more popular current varieties. This book is the foundation upon which the other books in the series are based and was originally written to be sufficient unto itself. Although the other books in this series allow one to expand his or her knowledge of flute-making, they are not sufficient without having read this book first.

[Price 1995] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using Grandfather's Flute, Love Flutes Series, Book 2, 1995, ISBN 0-917578-11-2, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Names of the Native American Flute, Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The second book in the Love Flute series. Tells how to create and use one of the varieties of older flutes, gives tables and graphs to aid in optimizing and creating more varieties of new and old Native American flutes, and explains more about the creation and use of the Native American flute. The particular type of older flute featured here will not choke up from moisture as do the most of the contemporary types of native flutes, and its playing quality is unsurpassed. Furthermore, it is ideal for creating flutes from materials such as heat-treated bamboo which has a natural beauty of its own.

[Price 1995a] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using Older Native American Flutes, Love Flutes Series, Book 3, 1995, ISBN 0-917578-13-9, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The third book in the love flute series. The older Native American flutes used tuning holes in the last stages of their creation. This book tells how to create and use flutes with tuning holes, how to compute and use equivalent diameters, gives tables and graphs on flutes with tuning holes, and tells more about the use of the flute.

[Price 1995b] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using Smaller Native American Flutes, Love Flutes Series, Book 4, 1995, ISBN 0-917578-14-7, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The fourth book in the love flute series. Tells the advantages of and how to create and use smaller Native American flutes, provides tables and graphs for creating smaller flutes, tells the nature of nodal interference and how to eliminate it, includes a chapter on ways to improve the appearance of any flute, and includes some philosophical comments.

[Price 1996] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using the Native American Concert Flute, Love Flutes Series, Book 8, 1996, ISBN 0-917578-16-3, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The eighth book in the love flute series. This is the most advanced book in the series, describing how to make an optimized Native American style flute which has a moisture-removing mechanism and independent adjustments for sound quality, transition point, and temperature. Includes a chapter called "Greatest of Secrets" which has universal significance. This book is not recommended unless the student is already familiar with flute-making.

[Price 1997] Lew Paxton Price. More Secrets of the Flute: More of the Physics, Math, and Design of Non-Mechanical Folk Flutes, published by El Dorado Press, 1997, ISBN 0-917578-17-1, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seven citations: Crafting Native American Flutes, NAFlutomat - Native American Flute Design Tool, Flute Makers' Forum, NAFlutomat - Native American Flute Design Tool, Flute and Sound Calculators on Flutopedia, Nodal Interference, Finger Hole Size

Author's description: The sequel to Secrets of the Flute, this book tells more about flute physics and math. The result of six more years of flute research, combined with the book above, this book allows the flutemaker to design the most extreme examples of flutes with accuracy, and is ideal for those who wish to have a total comprehension of the flute.

[Price 1998] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using Larger Native American Flutes, Love Flutes Series, Book 5, 1998, ISBN 0-917578-19-8, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The fifth book in the love flute series. Tells the advantages of, and how to create and use, larger Native American flutes, provides tables and graphs for creating larger flutes, explains the difficulties of larger flute design and how to work with them, gives ways to vary flute length without seriously affecting the sound, and includes some philosophical comments.

[Price 1998a] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using the Largest Native American Flutes, Love Flutes Series, Book 6, published by L. P. Price, P.O. Box 88, Garden Valley, CA 95633, 1998, 50 pages, ISBN 0-917578-20-1, softcover. Library of Congress call number ML990.N37 P75 1998. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The sixth book in the love flute series. Tells the advantages of, and how to create and use, the largest Native American flutes, provides tables and graphs for creating them, explains the difficulties of large flute design and how to work with them, and includes some philosophical comments.

[Price 1998b] Lew Paxton Price. Creating and Using Very Small Native American Flutes, Love Flutes Series, Book 7, 1998, ISBN 0-917578-22-8, softcover. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Flute Makers' Forum

Author's description: The seventh book in the love flute series. Tells the advantages of and how to create and use the smallest feasible full-working Native American flutes, provides designs for creating them (up to G# two above middle C), explains the difficulties of tiny flute design and how to work with them, and includes some philosophical comments. Tiny flutes are, by far, the most challenging of all flutes to design and craft.

[Price 2010] Lew Paxton Price. “How I Make Flutes Today”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2010, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, February 2010. See the Lew Paxton Price web site. How I Make Flutes Today Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Flute Crafting Dimensions, FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

[Riley 2006] Peter Riley; Charles Parker (editor). Notes on Making a Large Overtone Flute (the Fujara) from Readily Available Materials, November 5, 2006, 10 pages. Notes on Making a Large Overtone Flute (the Fujara) from Readily Available Materials Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Crafting a PVC Fujara

[Riley 2009] Peter Riley. Additional Notes on Making a Large Overtone Flute, January 8, 2009, 3 pages. Additional Notes on Making a Large Overtone Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Crafting a PVC Fujara

[Robinson 1981] Trevor Robinson. The Amateur Wind Instrument Maker, Revised edition, published by the University of Massachusetts Press, March 1981, 116 pages, ISBN 0-87023-312-2 (978-0-87023-312-8). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: This classic how-to-do-it manual is written for the serious craftsman as well as the musician interested in learning more about his or her instrument. It includes detailed descriptions of the materials and methods for making a number of traditional early European woodwinds. Information is provided on equipping the workshop, sources of design, pitch and tuning, taking measurements, choosing wood, boring and reaming, making joints, ferrules, bushings and decorations, reeds, finger-hole placement and techniques for finishing the instrument. Wooden instruments discussed include the flute and fife, recorders, clarinets, the shawm and oboe, krumhorns, racketts, cornetti. Brass instruments include the trumpet and horns.

Appendices cover museum collection of instruments, sources of materials and making specialized boring tools. An extensive bibliography is provided as are detailed tables and charts showing instrument dimensions.

[Sajfert 2011] Vjekoslav Sajfert, Sonja Krstić, Dušan Popov, Nicolina Pop. “Absorption of Sound Waves”, Seria Fizică (Physics Series), Analele Universităţii de Vest din Timişoara (Annals of the West University of Timisoara), Volume 55, January 2011, pages 13–19. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The effect of sound absorption in sound pipe was examined. It turned out those two types of absorption takes place in sound pipe: irreversible and reversible ones. Absorption of irreversible type has exponential distribution and for it relatively simply can be determined resulting absorption which essentially determined the quality of sound pipe. The reversible absorption decreases intensity of sound and it means that is a suitable to make instruments from the woods with minimal reversible absorption characteristics.

[Shands 2010] Donn Shands. How to Build a Simple North American Style Flute, March 1, 2010, 71 pages. How to Build a Simple North American Style Flute Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Crafting Native American Flutes

[Stanford 2008] Keith Stanford. Ki-e-ta's Manual for the Making of the Native American Style Flute (NAF), Version 12, 2008, 50 pages. See the CherryCows web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Seven citations: Crafting Native American Flutes, FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes (3), Native American Flute Bore Diameters, Flute Crafting Dimensions (2)

[Stanford 2008a] Keith Stanford. Ki-e-ta’s Shop Booklet for the Native American Style Flute (NAF), 2008, 87 pages. See the CherryCows web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Crafting Native American Flutes

[Stanford 2012] Keith Stanford. Native Yucca Stalk Flute Making Manual, 2012, 86 pages. See the CherryCows web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Two citations: Proto-Flutes and Yucca Stalks, Glossary of Native American Flute Terms

[Stanford 2014] Keith Stanford. Ki-e-ta's CherryCows Manual for the Making of Flutes inspired by Native American Style Flutes (NAF), Version 16, 2014. See the CherryCows web site Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Equal-Spaced Finger Hole Placement

[Suits 2005] Roland Suits. “Reconstructing and Making Replicas of Musical Instruments from the Conservator´s / Instrument Maker’s Viewpoint”. Reconstructing and Making Replicas of Musical Instruments from the Conservator´s / Instrument Maker’s Viewpoint Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Suttles 2004] John Suttles. “Screaming G Flute Plans”, 2004, 1 page. Screaming G Flute Plans Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Plans for Making Native American Flutes

[USDOA 2007] U. S. Department of Agriculture. The Encyclopedia of Wood, published by Skyhorse Publishing Inc, 2007, 496 pages, ISBN 1-60239-057-6 (978-1-60239-057-7). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Publisher's description: Timber is one of our most precious, versatile, and vulnerable resources, so using it effectively is important. Knowing your material inside and out is the first step to doing just that. Read about the structure of wood itself, from growth rings to its chemical composition. Learn wood’s physical and mechanical properties, including everything from elasticity to nuclear radiation. This extensive manual includes a section on stress grading as well as thorough descriptions of which fasteners to use and when. It has information on adhesive bonding, biodeterioration, control of moisture content, preservation, fire safety, specialty treatments, and much more. The Encyclopedia of Wood is an essential resource for builders, architects, engineers, and woodworkers.

[Wolf 2001] R. A. Wolf. Flute Shop: A Guide to Crafting the Native American Style Flute, 2001, 88 pages, comb binding. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Ten citations: Native American Flute Bore Diameters, FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes (3), Glossary of Native American Flute Terms (2), Flute Crafting Dimensions (4)

[Wolf 2004] R. A. Wolf. Flute Shop: A Guide to Crafting the Native American Style Flute, Revised Edition, published by Wolf Song Publications, December 1, 2004, 109 pages, ISBN 0-9761543-0-7 (978-0-9761543-0-3), comb binding. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Four citations: Crafting Native American Flutes, Native American Flute Bore Diameters (2), FAQ about Crafting Native American Flutes

 
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