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Emotion and Music

This is a list of references related to the link between emotion and music. These references are are cited throughout Flutopedia.

The references on this page are a sub-set of the complete list of Flutopedia references.

For information on the format and other details of these citations, see the main references page.

Ergonomics

[Balkwill 1999] Laura-Lee Balkwill and William Forde Thompson. “A Cross-Cultural Investigation of the Perception of Emotion in Music: Psychophysical and Cultural Cues”, Music and Perception, Volume 17, Number 1, published by the University of California Press, Fall 1999, pages 43–64. Publication 40285811 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Studies of the link between music and emotion have primarily focused on listeners' sensitivity to emotion in the music of their own culture. This sensitivity may reflect listeners' enculturation to the conventions of their culture's tonal system. However, it may also reflect responses to psychophysical dimensions of sound that are independent of musical experience. A model of listeners' perception of emotion in music is proposed in which emotion in music is communicated through a combination of universal and cultural cues. Listeners may rely on either of these cues, or both, to arrive at an understanding of musically expressed emotion. The current study addressed the hypotheses derived from this model using a cross-cultural approach. The following questions were investigated: Can people identify the intended emotion in music from an unfamiliar tonal system? If they can, is their sensitivity to intended emotions associated with perceived changes in psychophysical dimensions of music? Thirty Western listeners rated the degree of joy, sadness, anger, and peace in 12 Hindustani raga excerpts (field recordings obtained in North India). In accordance with the raga-rasa system, each excerpt was intended to convey one of the four moods or "rasas" that corresponded to the four emotions rated by listeners. Listeners also provided ratings of four psychophysical variables: tempo, rhythmic complexity, melodic complexity, and pitch range. Listeners were sensitive to the intended emotion in ragas when that emotion was joy, sadness, or anger. Judgments of
emotion were significantly related to judgments of psychophysical dimensions, and, in some cases, to instrument timbre. The findings suggest that listeners are sensitive to musically expressed emotion in an unfamiliar tonal system, and that this sensitivity is facilitated by psychophysical clues.

[Darwin 1872] Charles Darwin. The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, 1872, 374 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Goldman 2011] Jonathan Goldman and Andi Goldman. Chakra Frequencies: Tantra of Sound, published by Inner Traditions / Bear & Co, May 24, 2011, 208 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Color of Sound - Pitch-to-Color Calculator

[Gosvami 1957] O. Gosvami. The Story of Indian Music: Its Growth and Synthesis, December 1957, 332 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnston-A 2014] Amy Johnston. “Charles Greul: The Non-Aboriginal Forebearer to the Northwest Coast Printmaking Movement”, The Carleton Graduate Journal of Art and Culture, Volume 2, 2014, 19 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Charles Greul was a non-Aborignal printmaker working in the style of the Northwest Coast during the mid-twentieth century. The scarcity of information on his life and work is acute, leaving only a birthdate of 1923, a possible immigrant status and a printmaking career based in British Columbia spanning the 1950s to the early 1960s. This paper discusses his work through four areas of study: authenticity, appropriation, the tourist market and reactions to, and against, his work. Together, they provide a basis from which to discuss the ways Greul and his prints inserted themselves into the changing discourse of Northwest Coast Aboriginal art production, appreciation and dissemination. Cumulatively, this paper aims to provide a contextualization of Greul’s work in order to argue that his prints played a crucial role in the rise of the printmaking medium among Aboriginal artists of the Northwest Coast. One of Greul’s promotional flyers, found in the Carleton Univeristy Art Gallery’s MacDonald collection, is the foundation from which this argument derives.

[Juslin 2010] Patrik N. Juslin and John Sloboda (editors). Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications, published by Oxford University Press, April 2010. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Karuna 2013] Nagarajan Karuna, Thaiyar M Srinivasan, and Nagendra HR. “Review of Rāgās and its Rasās in Indian Music and its Possible Applications in Therapy”, International Journal of Yoga - Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology, Volume 1, January–June 2013, pages 21–28. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The imbalances between our outlook toward life and insight cause stress. This could most of the times result in psychosomatic ailments. By modification of our innermost attitude, we can bring peace, satisfaction and comfort irrespective of the external environment. There are many systems of healing for countering perceived stress, which helps to manage stress as well as its impact on the systems of the body. In this paper, an attempt is made to review the Indian Rāgās and the interwoven agreeable rasās (aesthetic mood) in them. The willful submission to the notes of the music and the willingness to release the negative thought patterns may be helpful in healing physically. Based on many research made on the metaphysical causation of disease, we have attempted to list particular melody or rāgās depicting a particular aesthetic mood, which could help to heal a particular disease.

[Klotsche 2012] Charles Klotsche. Color Medicine, published by Light Technology Publishing, May 21, 2012. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Color of Sound - Pitch-to-Color Calculator

[Krishna 2010] Koduri Gopala Krishna. Musicological and Technological Exploration of Truths and Myths in Carnatic Music, the Raagam in Particular, Masters in Computer Science thesis – International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad, India, December 2010, 68 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The classical music traditions of the Indian subcontinent, Hindustani and Carnatic, offer an excellent ground on which to test the limitations of the current music information research approaches. At the same time, their study can shed light on how to solve new and complex music modeling problems. Both traditions have very distinct characteristics, specially compared with western ones: they have developed their own instruments, musical forms, performance practices, social uses and context. In this thesis, we focus on the Carnatic music tradition of south India, especially on its melodic characteristics.

Raaga is the spine of Indian classical music. It is the single most crucial element of the melodic framework on which the music of the subcontinent thrives. Naturally, automatic raaga recognition is an important step in computational musicology as far as Indian music is considered. It has several applications like indexing Indian music, automatic note transcription, comparing, classifying and recommending tunes, and teaching to mention a few. Simply put, it is the first logical step in the process of creating computational methods for Indian classical music. In this thesis, we investigate the properties of a raaga and the natural process by which people identify the raaga. We survey the past raaga recognition techniques correlating them with human techniques, in both Hindustani and Carnatic music systems. We identify the main drawbacks and propose minor, but multiple improvements to the state-of-the-art raaga recognition technique.

Music is said to evoke emotions. After the advent of advanced signal processing techniques and easily accessible computational resources, the scientists and engineers have been trying to understand the nature of music in this very context. In this context, one of the several aspects of Indian music which interests us is the traditional association of emotions with raagas. Besides the ancient scriptures like Natyasastra, the recent articles of several scholars also associate the raagas with emotions. A part of our work is dedicated to the investigation of the origin of this association. We discuss the term rasa, often mistaken as emotion. We also report the results of a survey conducted to study the aforementioned raaga-emotion association.

We also overview the other theoretical aspects that are relevant for music information research and discuss the scarce computational approaches developed so far. We put emphasis on the limitations of the current methodologies and we present some open issues that have not yet been addressed and that we believe are important to be worked on.

[Mercier 2000] Patricia Mercier. Chakras: Balance Your Body's Energy for Health and Harmony, published by Sterling, 2000, 128 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Color of Sound - Pitch-to-Color Calculator

[Paul 2006] Russill Paul and Wayne Teasdale. The Yoga of Sound: Tapping the Hidden Power of Music and Chant, published by New World Library, March 1, 2006, 306 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: The Color of Sound - Pitch-to-Color Calculator

[Rushing 1986] W. Jackson Rushing. “Ritual and Myth: Native American Culture and Abstract Expressionism”, Contained in [Tuchman 1986], 1986, pages 273–295. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Thompson-WF 2010] William Forde Thompson and Laura-Lee Balkwill. “Cross-cultural Similarities and Differences”, Contained in [Juslin 2010], Chapter 27, April 2010, pages 755–788, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230143.001.0001 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

 
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To cite this page on Wikipedia: <ref name="Goss_2016_refs_emo"> {{cite web |last=Goss |first=Clint |title= Emotion and Music |url=http://www.Flutopedia.com/refs_emo.htm |date=20 December 2016 |website=Flutopedia |access-date=<YOUR RETRIEVAL DATE> }}</ref>