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Contemporary Rim-Blown Flutes

This page documents some of the history surrounding contemporary reconstructions and replicas of traditional styles of rim-blown flutes. This history was provided by several flute makers who were involved in the movement to expore the artifacts. Information and photos were shared in personal communications in early 2013, and I am providing them to document this interesting bit of flute history.

From Michael Graham Allen, April 2, 2013:

When I met Dr. [Richard W.] Payne around 1980 he already had rim-flutes that he had made somewhat earlier, perhaps as early as 1968. Doc (Dr. Payne) had a Hopi replica as well as some smaller diatonic rim-flutes of his own design. Doc played the flutes Nay style so his flutes had simple rims. I am not aware of Doc making rim-flutes for anyone or demonstrating them in public (he sounded terrible on them). I made small rim-flutes for Doc back in the mid 90's, ½ inch bore with my own more melodic scales at his request. … I also recall Doc having made bamboo and cane rim flutes of various kinds in the 80's. Surely others had made archaeologically-inspired rim-flutes over the decades.

Doc (Payne) was an admirer of Hopi flutes, his book: The Hopi Flute Ceremony (1993) contains a picture of a Hopi replica that Doc made.

The image to which Michael Graham Allen refers is on the inside of the front cover of [Payne 1993]. The description on page 54 of that publication notes that it is a “reproduction of a Hopi flute by the author”:

Replica of a Hopi flute by Dr. Richard W. Payne

Replica of a Hopi flute by Dr. Richard W. Payne
Photograph on the inside front cover of [Payne 1993] Larger image

From Michael Graham Allen, April 2, 2013, regarding the image below:

… a small experimental rim-flute (bird head) made for Doc in the late 90's.
Doc plugged the original holes and retuned with the holes visible.
13¾″

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's
Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen Larger image

This is the reverse side showing my original tuning of the flute:

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's
Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen Larger image

Doc seemed to use this flute to develop & practice his Toubat signature, I like the eyes on the bird head:

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's

Experimental Rim-blown bird's head flute, late 1990's
Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen Larger image

From Michael Graham Allen, April 2, 2013, regarding the image below and to the right:

Detail of the prototype notch. Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen

Detail of the prototype notch
Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen Larger image

… an Anasazi design that I made around 2001, possibly earlier. The flute has several modifications including the notch but I think this flute was made with a smaller notch originally. I would guess that this flute was made in the Summer of 2001. about 29½″ long. Oh yes, I played this flute on stage at the Taos INAFA, not very well as I remember.

The “Taos INAFA” to which he refers was the first INAFA convention, Taos, New Mexico, June 7–10, 2001.

Contemporary Anasazi flute prototype, about 2001

Contemporary Anasazi flute prototype, about 2001
Photo courtesy of Michael Graham Allen Larger image

 

 
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To cite this page on Wikipedia: <ref name="Goss_2017_contemporary_rim_blown"> {{cite web |last=Goss |first=Clint |title=Contemporary Rim-Blown Flutes |url=http://www.Flutopedia.com/contemporary_rim_blown.htm |date=3 February 2017 |website=Flutopedia |access-date=<YOUR RETRIEVAL DATE> }}</ref>