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Music Education References

This is a list of references related to Music Education cited throughout Flutopedia.

The references on this page are a sub-set of the complete list of Flutopedia references.

For information on the format and other details of these citations, see the main references page.

Music Education References

[Agrell 2008] Jeffrey Agrell. Improvisation Games for Classical Musicians, published by GIA Publications, Chicago, Illinois, 2008, 354 pages, ISBN 1-57999-682-5 (978-1-57999-682-6). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Atkinson-RC 1968] R. C. Atkinson and R. M. Shiffrin. “Human Memory: A Proposed System and its Control Processes”, contained in [Spence-KW 1968], 1968, pages 89–195. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[Barrientos 2007] Alexa Barrientos. “Music in Education”, contained in [French 2007], Spring 2007, pages 70–78. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Barry 2003] Nancy H. Barry and Paula Conlon. “Powwow in the Classroom”, Music Educators Journal, Volume 90, Number 2, November 2003, pages 21–26. Publication 3399930 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Bishko 2012] Andrew Markus Bishko; Tom McCune (illustrations). First Lessons Native American Flute: How to Sit on a Rock, published by Mel Bay, 2012, 60 pages, ISBN 1-61911-303-1 (978-1-61911-303-9). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Broderick 2000] Sylvia Broderick. “Kids and Native American Flute Music”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2000, Volume 1, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2000, pages 8–9. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Burns-BD 2004] Bruce D. Burns. “The Effects of Speed on Skilled Chess Performance”, Psychological Science, Volume 15, Number 7, 2004, pages 442–447. The Effects of Speed on Skilled Chess Performance Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

Abstract: Two types of mechanisms may underlie chess skill: fast mechanisms, such as recognition, and slow mechanisms, such as search through the space of possible moves and responses. Speed distinguishes these mechanisms, so I examined archival data on blitz chess (5 min for the whole game), in which the opportunities for search are greatly reduced. If variation in fast processes accounts for substantial variation in chess skill, performance in blitz chess should correlate highly with a player's overall skill. In addition, restricting search processes should tend to equalize skill difference between players, but this effect should decrease as overall skill level increases. Analyses of three samples of blitz chess tournaments supported both hypotheses. Search is undoubtedly important, but up to 81% of variance in chess skill (measured by rating) was accounted for by how players performed with less than 5% of the normal time available.

[Chase-WG 1973] William G. Chase and Herbert A. Simon. “Perception in Chess”, Cognitive Psychology, Volume 4, Number 1, 1973, pages 55–81. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

Abstract: This paper develops a technique for isolating and studying the perceptual structures that chess players perceive. Three chess players of varying strength - from master to novice - were confronted with two tasks: (1) A perception task, where the player reproduces a chess position in plain view, and (2) de Groot’s (1965) short-term recall task, where the player reproduces a chess position after viewing it for 5 sec. The successive glances at the position in the perceptual task and long pauses in tbe memory task were used to segment the structures in the reconstruction protocol. The size and nature of these structures were then analyzed as a function of chess skill.

[Clark-RE 2012] Richard E. Clark, Paul A. Kirschner, and John Sweller. “Putting Students on the Path to Learning: The Case for Fully Guided Instruction”, American Educator, Spring 2012, pages 6–11. Putting Students on the Path to Learning Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[DAngelo 2009] Cynthia D'Angelo, Stephanie Touchman, Douglas Clark, Angela O'Donnell, Richard Mayer, David Dean, Jr., and Cindy Hmelo-Silver. Constructivism, published by The Gale Group, 2009. Constructivism Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[deGroot 1965] Adriaan D. de Groot. Thought and Choice in Chess, published by Mouton De Gruyter, The Hague, Netherlands, 1965, 479 pages, ISBN 90-279-7914-6 (978-90-279-7914-8). Originally published in 1946. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[Edwards-KL 1998] Kay L. Edwards. “Multicultural Music Instruction in the Elementary School: What Can Be Achieved?”, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Number 138, published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Council for Research in Music Education, Fall 1998, pages 62–82. Publication 40318939 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Increased interest in multicultural music education raises questions regarding student outcomes and learning. No qualitative studies were found that addressed achievement resulting from instruction in multicultural music. This study sought an answer to the following question: What is the nature of musical or nonmusical achievement acquired from each of four instructional approaches in American Indian music? Instructional approaches utilized a social studies/music approach that consisted of large-group lessons with authentic (native) instruments, an American Indian guest artist, and the use of nonauthentic or authentic instruments in small-group learning centers. An additional fourth-grade music class was taught traditional curriculum (music listen- ing/analysis, singing, recorder, and an Israeli folk dance) with no American Indian music. I observed the classes and trained the school's music teacher in the American Indian music components.

Qualitative data in the form of student-written paragraphs (achievement writing samples) were gathered following the 6-week (12-lesson) instructional period. Coded analyses revealed distinct differences in breadth and depth (amount written and content richness) between the groups receiving Indian music instruction and the traditional curriculum group. Each of the groups expressed unique learnings related to their particular instruction. Although student writings from the Indian music classes most often mentioned the acquisition of Indian culture- based content and skills, additional prominent categories included instructional attitudes, cul- tural awareness/sensitivity and valuing. Subcategories such as cultural similarities/dissimilari- ties and self-acknowledgment of growth also emerged. An instructional theory was formulated, stating that fourth-grade students are capable of four levels of responses from multicultural music instruction: knowledge/skills/attitudes, cultural awareness, sensitivity, and valuing.

If such responses are desired outcomes, the results suggest implications for instruction with American Indian music regarding instructional approach, authenticity of materials, learning from a native guest artist, teacher preparation, and curricular time. Results from the study suggest that multicultural "achievement " can include many forms of musical and extramusical learning, but that in-depth experiences can facilitate unique learning and depth of understanding about another culture. The nature of achievement from experiences in multicultural music needs further research.

[FAA 2008] Federal Aviation Administration, U. S. Department of Transportation. Aviation Instructor’s Handbook, published by the U. S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, Flight Standards Service, 2008, 228 pages. Publication FAA-H-8083-9A. Aviation Instructor’s Handbook Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[French 2007] Michael P. French (editor). A Collection of Literature Reviews Written by the MED Students from EDU 612, Volume 1, published by Lourdes College, Spring 2007, 150 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huitt 2009] W. Huitt. Humanism and Open Education, published by Educational Psychology Interactive, 2009, retrieved August 4, 2013. Humanism and Open Education Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Huitt 2012] W. Huitt. A Systems Approach to the Study of Human Behavior, published by Educational Psychology Interactive, 2012, retrieved August 4, 2013. A Systems Approach to the Study of Human Behavior Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-G 2001] Gordon Johnson. “Spreading the Fun! The Native American Flute in the School System”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2001, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2001, pages 5–6. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Johnson-G 2004] Gordon Johnson. “Spreading the Fun! The Native American Flute in the School System — Part 2”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2004, Volume 2, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2004, pages 16–17. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Joyce-Grendahl 2012] Kathleen Joyce-Grendahl. “Getting the Most Out of a Private Flute Lesson”, Voice of the Wind, Year 2012, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 2012. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Khatib 2013] Mohammad Khatib, Saeid Najafi Sarem, and Hadi Hamidi. “Humanistic Education: Concerns, Implications and Applications”, Journal of Language Teaching and Research, Volume 4, Number 1, January 2013, pages 45–51, doi:10.4304/jltr.4.1.45-51 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Humanistic approach introduced by the ideas of Scholars like Erickson, Roger, and Maslow began to permeate the field of second language teaching and learning towards the end of 1970. According to Lei (2007) humanistic approach emphasizes the importance of the inner world of the learner and places the individual’s thought, emotions and feelings at the forefront of all human development. Due to this new shift of focus, language education and pedagogy moved away from the previous behavioristic and mentalistic approaches, and as a result, a new kind of education known as humanistic education emerged. Consequently, significant changes occurred in all aspects of language education, that is, the traditional roles of teachers and learners were redefined and the previously authoritarian teaching practices were replaced by learner-centered classrooms. This paper is of two-fold. First, it is going to take a detailed look at the main principles and features of humanistic education, and second, it is aimed at discussing the implications and applications of humanistic education. Finally, it tries to clarify the new roles and responsibilities considered for language teachers to be able to fully engage the students in the learning process.

[Kirschner 2006] Paul A. Kirschner, John Sweller, and Richard E. Clark. “Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not Work: An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experimental, and Inquiry-Based Teaching”, Educational Psychologist, Volume 41, Number 2, published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2006, pages 75–86. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

Abstract: Evidence for the superiority of guided instruction is explained in the context of our knowledge of human cognitive architecture, expert–novice differences, and cognitive load. Although unguided or minimally guided instructional approaches are very popular and intuitively appealing, the point is made that these approaches ignore both the structures that constitute human cognitive architecture and evidence from empirical studies over the past half-century that consistently indicate that minimally guided instruction is less effective and less efficient than instructional approaches that place a strong emphasis on guidance of the student learning process. The advantage of guidance begins to recede only when learners have sufficiently high prior knowledge to provide “internal” guidance. Recent developments in instructional research and instructional designmodels that support guidance during instruction are briefly described.

[Koltko-Rivera 2006] Mark E. Koltko-Rivera. “Rediscovering the Later Version of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: Self-Transcendence and Opportunities for Theory, Research, and Unification”, Review of General Psychology, Volume 10, Number 4, 2006, pages 302–317, doi:10.1037/1089-2680.10.4.302 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: The conventional description of Abraham Maslow’s (1943, 1954) hierarchy of needs is inaccurate as a description of Maslow’s later thought. Maslow (1969a) amended his model, placing self-transcendence as a motivational step beyond self-actualization. Objections to this reinterpretation are considered. Possible reasons for the persistence of the conventional account are described. Recognizing self-transcendence as part of Maslow’s hierarchy has important consequences for theory and research: (a) a more comprehensive understanding of worldviews regarding the meaning of life; (b) broader understanding of the motivational roots of altruism, social progress, and wisdom; (c) a deeper understanding of religious violence; (d) integration of the psychology of religion and spirituality into the mainstream of psychology; and (e) a more multiculturally integrated approach to psychological theory.

[Levy 2013] James Levy. Toward a New Model Of Urban Music Education: An Adaptation of el Sistema for a fourth Grade Keyboard Class, With Curricular Perspectives, 2013. Toward a New Model Of Urban Music Education Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Matsunobu 2009] Koji Matsunobu. Artful Encounters with Nature: Ecological and Spiritual Dimensions of Music Learning, Doctoral dissertation – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009, 359 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: Indigenous knowledge is preserved, practiced, and passed down in a variety of ways in contemporary societies including supposedly highly modernized places such as Japan. One example from the pre-modern musical realm is the shakuhachi, a type of bamboo flute that has recently experienced a new wave of attention both inside and outside Japan. This dissertation offers an in-depth analysis of how contemporary music practitioners/educators interpret, appropriate, and practice the tradition of spiritual music both inside and outside Japan, focusing on how they reframe and embody what I identify as indigenous cultural values in today‘s educational settings.

[Miksza 2009] Peter Miksza. “An Exploratory Study of a Confluence Model of Preservice Music Teacher Creativity «職前音樂教師創造性匯合模式的探索性研究»”, Music Education Research International, Volume 3, 2009, pages 29–43. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This study investigated the viability of adapting the Sternberg and Lubart (1995) confluence model of creativity in the context of preservice instrumental music teaching. The model suggested that one’s ability to be creative hinged on six distinct yet interrelated personal resources: intellect, knowledge, thinking style, personality, motivation, and environmental constraint. Two undergraduate music education students teaching in a band outreach program participated in this study. Data sources included (a) the Sternberg and Wagner (1991) Thinking Styles Questionnaire (O’Hara & Sternberg, 2001), (b) the Costa and McCrae (1992) NEO-PIR, (c) a researcher-adapted Motivation for Teaching Questionnaire, (d) objective measures of teaching effectiveness across seven weeks, (e) an objective measure of student achievement, (f) semi-structured, open-ended interviews, and (g) consensual assessment of music teacher creativity. Independent judges verified the reliability of observational data. Results indicated that the music teacher creativity rankings from the consensual assessment corresponded with the respective teacher profiles resulting from the psychological measures and interviews, which was consistent with Sternberg and Lubart’s theory. The teacher ranked most creative also (a) had the highest legislative thinking score on the Thinking Styles Questionnaire, (b) had the highest openness score on the NEO-PI, (c) reported a willingness to take risks, (d) reported the highest level of intrinsic motivation, and (e) considered the environment to be open to creative possibilities. Although teaching effectiveness ratings improved over time for both participants, the teacher rated more creative was also more effective overall.
Translation: 本研究調查在職前器樂教學背景下運用Sternberg and Lubart (1995)創造性匯
合模式的可行性。這一模式提出一個人的創造能力取决于六大截然不同而互
相關聯的個體資源,即智力、知識、思維風格、個性、動機和環境限制。兩
位在樂隊拓展課程中任教的本科音樂教育學生參與了本研究。數據來源包括
(a) Sternberg and Wagner (1991)的思維風格問卷(O’Hara & Sternberg, 2001),
(b) Costa and McCrae (1992) 的NEO-PI-R人格問卷,(c)經研究者調適的教學
動機問卷,(d)七周教學有效性的客觀測量,(e)學生成績的客觀測量,(f)半結
構、開放式訪談,以及(g)音樂教師創造性的評估。所觀察數據的信度經獨立
鑒定人檢驗。研究結果說明,音樂教師的創造性評級源自教師創造力的評估,
此評估與由心理測量和訪談而得的教師剖面相符合。而這正與Sternberg和
Lubart’s的理論一致。最具創造性的教師(a)在思維風格問卷中立法思考水平
分最高,(b)在NEO-PI-R人格問卷中開放水平分最高,(c)表示願意承受風險,
(d)表現出最高水平的內在動機,幷且(e)認爲周圍環境對各種創造可能性是開
放的。儘管兩位參與者的教學有效性水平與日俱增,但從整體上看較具創造
性的教師的教學則更爲有效。

[Moore-RS 1976] Randall S. Moore. “Effect of Differential Teaching Techniques on Achievement, Attitude, and Teaching Skills”, Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume 24, Number 3, Autumn 1976, pages 129–141. Publication 3345156 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the effect of differential teaching techniques on achievement, attitude, and teaching skills of 125 college students enrolled in elementary music education classes. Five teaching techniques included contingency-managed instruction (CMI), independent study, CMI-lecture discussion, contact control, and delay contact control groups. The five treatment groups were taught the same instructional materials, pretested, and posttested on modular units pertaining to the elementary music education competencies and teaching skills. Analyses of the data showed no significant differences among groups on pretests, while CMI groups performed better on posttests and the CMI-lecture discussion group best on teaching skills. CMI groups generally demonstrated higher attitude responses. It was concluded that CMI is effective in teaching elementary music education concepts and skills, and that the combination CMI-lecture discussion method includes the benefits of CMI while adding teacher modeling by way of class lectures. It was conjectured that this teacher modeling perhaps provided the basis for higher scores in actual teaching skills.

[Prinzing 2009] Scott S. Prinzing. American Indian Music: More than Just Flutes and Drums — A Guide to American Indian Music, Indian Education for All, published by the Montana Office of Public Instruction, Winter 2009, 23 pages. See the Montana Office of Public Instruction web site. American Indian Music: More than Just Flutes and Drums Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Introduction: The goal of American Indian Music: More Than Just Drums and Flutes is to assist Montana teachers in incorporating an appreciation for Indian music into music and social studies curricula to meet Indian Education for All criteria.

[Qin 2007] Qin Lei. “US-China Education Review”, US-China Education Review, Volume 4, Number 3, March 2007, pages 60–67. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Individual learners’ affective factors are very important for foreign language learning. In China foreign language learning mainly happens in classroom. Foreign language teachers are the organizers and carriers of language classes, and thus they inevitably influence the students’ affection. This study explores how EFL teachers influence students’ affect, what the teachers should do to develop and make good use of students’ positive affect, and what the teachers should do to avoid the negative affect and facilitate its possible transformation into the positive.

[Rowan 2005] John Rowan. A Guide to Humanistic Psychology, Third Edition, published by the UK Association for Humanistic Psychology Practitioners, November 2005. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

One citation: Lessons on Lessons - article by Clint Goss

[Spence-KW 1968] K. W. Spence and J. T. Spence (editors). The Psychology of Learning and Motivation: Advances in Research and Theory, Volume 2, published by Academic Press, New York, 1968. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Stream 2011] William B. Stream. “Creating Student Engagement? HMM: Teaching and Learning with Humor, Music, and Movement”, Creative Education, Volume 2, Number 3, May 17, 2011, page 189–192, doi:10.4236/ce.2011.23026 Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: With growing concerns about student engagement, the theme of creative teaching and learning provides an ex-cellent catalyst to consider methods that enhance students’ classroom experiences. Good teaching is akin to weaving a fabric of connectedness between student, teacher, and subject (Palmer, 2007). Teacher-student con-nection and student engagement are the two most important ingredients in teaching (Lowman, 1995). This paper explores three effective methods of weaving the fabric and engaging students in higher education. Examples of how to use humor, music, and movement to deepen learning while adding energy, engagement, and interaction are offered. A review of research supporting the methods explored in this paper is included.

[Tate 1998] Elda Tate. “Native American Flute in a University Curriculum”, Voice of the Wind, Year 1998, Volume 4, published by the International Native American Flute Association, Suffolk, Virginia, 1998, pages 9–10. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

[Winslow-M 2006] Michael Winslow and Hayley Winslow. “Using the Native American Flute in a Beginning Instrumental Classroom”, Music Educators Journal, Volume 92, Number 3, published by The National Association for Music Education (MENC), January 2006, pages 46–49, doi:10.2307/3401140. ISSN: 0027-4321. Publication 3401140 on JSTOR (subscription access). Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

Abstract: Although the National Standards include achievement standards for improvisation for elementary school students, music teachers sometimes are reluctant to pursue improvisation study with young students. First- and second-year instrumental students, often older elementary or middle school students, may have difficulty studying improvisation because they must also focus on such fundamentals of music as melody, rhythm, and new notes, while learning the basic principles of playing an instrument, such as fingerings and bowings. As many teachers know, trying to cover all the basics with beginners is difficult, but trying to implement all the aspects of music as outlined by the nine National Standards, including improvisation (Standard 3: Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments), with these beginning students can be overwhelming. There is a way to help students get started with improvisation that eliminates many of the difficulties just mentioned. This approach focuses on free improvisation, which is the creation of only a melody on any instrument. The Native American flute is a useful tool for teaching free improvisation, and it offers the additional benefit of providing exciting possibilities for incorporating Native American music into the instrumental music curriculum.

[Woody 1999] Linda R. Rowland Woody. Resources for the Practice of Native American Songs and Dances in the Elemenary Classroom, Doctoral dissertation – University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, 1999, 184 pages. Search Google Scholar Flutopedia format citation APA format citation Chicago format citation MLA format citation Wikipedia format citation

 
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To cite this page on Wikipedia: <ref name="Goss_2017_refs_edu"> {{cite web |last=Goss |first=Clint |title= Music Education References for the Native American Flute |url=http://www.Flutopedia.com/refs_edu.htm |date=3 February 2017 |website=Flutopedia |access-date=<YOUR RETRIEVAL DATE> }}</ref>